Water Stewardship
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MP stuck with Bhopal waste which threatens its drinking water (and no one wants it).

MP stuck with Bhopal waste which threatens its drinking water (and no one wants it). | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The 28th anniversary of the world`s worst industrial tragedy falls on December 3, but the toxic chemical waste at the Union Carbide plant premises here has not been disposed off and is unlikely to be done soon.

There are about 350 metric tonnes of waste lying in the Union Carbide plant premises and all attempts claimed to have been made by the state government to dispose it have been in vain....

However, the Gujarat government refused to accept the waste after people in Gujarat launched an agitation against it, at a time when elections are around the corner, besides it was also opposed by some voluntary organisations.

After the Gujarat government's refusal, the MP state government had planned to dispose off the waste at Pithampur and 40 metric tonnes of waste was even burnt there. But later, it was claimed that the incinerator at Pithampur was not good enough for disposing off the waste, while BJP leader and former union minister Vikram Verma too led an agitation against the waste disposal.

Attempts to get the waste disposed off at Nagpur and Germany too failed.

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Sea level rose 60 percent faster than UN projections, study finds

Sea level rose 60 percent faster than UN projections, study finds | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Projections for sea level rise in coming decades could be too conservative, experts warned Wednesday, saying they found that the rise over the last two decades is much more than predicted by the U.N. scientific body tracking climate signals.

"Global warming has not slowed down or is lagging behind the projections," lead author Stefan Rahmstorf, a researcher at Germany's Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, said in a statement. "The IPCC is far from being alarmist and in fact in some cases rather underestimates possible risks." 

The experts added that the faster sea level rise is unlikely to be caused by a temporary ice discharge from Greenland or Antarctica ice sheets because it correlates very well with the increase in global temperature.

The IPCC earlier estimated that seas rose by about 7 inches over the last century, and its most recent report, published in 2007, estimated a range of between 7 and 23 inches this century — enough to worsen coastal flooding and erosion during storm surges.

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First World Problem: Nothing But Clean, Filtered Water to Drink

First World Problem: Nothing But Clean, Filtered Water to Drink | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
My friend’s grandma never drank water. “That’s for horses,” she would say. Instead, she drank cafe au lait or orange juice.
My own grandma rarely drinks water, usually preferring coffee or juices.

A lot of people in the developed world are this way, even those who are told by their doctors that they are dehydrated. There is a lot of debate about how much water people should be drinking (that old adage about 8 glasses a day turns out not to be based on any scientific studies).

But what is clear is that those of us in the developed world are overwhelmingly served by clean, safe, reliable drinking water. (Charles Fishman has written about the bottled water question here.)

Unfortunately, this is often not the case in much of the developing world, where many people are at risk from sanitation problems and lack of access to reliable water sources.

This infographic from a plumber site takes a look at some of these issues:

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How will New York keep out a rising sea? Dikes, huge sea wall, oyster beds? - Christian Science Monitor

How will New York keep out a rising sea? Dikes, huge sea wall, oyster beds? - Christian Science Monitor | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Christian Science MonitorHow will New York keep out a rising sea? Dikes, huge sea wall, oyster beds?
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US Navy begins inquiry into toxic waste dumping in Subic Bay, Philippines - aside from Phil Senate inquiry

US Navy begins inquiry into toxic waste dumping in Subic Bay, Philippines - aside from Phil Senate inquiry | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The US Navy has launched its own investigation into allegations that its contractor has been dumping on Subic Bay hazardous wastes which it siphons from US Navy ships docked here.
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How wetlands provide free flood control - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium

How wetlands provide free flood control - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Coastal wetlands are ecosystems that serve many valuable functions; they are important sources of food and fresh water.

They provide valuable services, including water treatment and erosion control. Wetlands filter water and provide habitat for a number of animal and plant species. They also serve as recreational areas for various outdoor activities. Wetlands comprise large extensions of coastal land and are highly valuable because they protect coastal land from flooding and damage caused by natural phenomena, such as hurricanes and storms.

 

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Caribbean sardine collapse linked to climate change - SciDev.Net

Caribbean sardine collapse linked to climate change - SciDev.Net | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Changes in wind patterns and water circulation, caused by climate change, are depleting sardine numbers in the south Caribbean, finds a study. (Not the little salty fishes in tin cans!

The sardine, Sardinella aurita, feeds on plankton but since 2005, plankton levels in the Caribbean have reduced significantly, which, coupled with overfishing, may have contributed to the collapse of these fisheries — which plummeted by as much as 87 per cent, the study says.

The research team said that the decreasing levels of plankton production are the result of a reduction in ocean upwelling, whereby nutrients crucial for plankton production are brought from the sea's floor to the surface. The drop in upwelling has, in turn, been driven by changes in wind patterns and wind strength, themselves driven by global climate change.

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GoforWood.info | The use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (.eu)

GoforWood.info | The use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (.eu) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Portal to the forestal, sylvicultural, woodworking and related trades and activities...

Over the last 6 months, the project has carried out a forest management plan for a plantation irrigated with treated waste water along the Suez Canal, Egypt; implemented a ferti-irrigation plant in Morocco and a phyto-depuration plant in an oasis of the Sahara desert in Algeria. Another two agroforestry systems will be designed to provide treated waste water in Tunisia. In the four Mediterranean countries, the FAO project aims to increase the quality and availability of water for agroforestry production to ensure food security and to control desertification. The project also provides country capacity building through training courses to national professionals as well as knowledge and technology transfer within project countries. A PhD student will work on the implementation of the ferti-irrigation plant of Marrakech. Despite the small budget and limited time, the project complies with the UNCCD and Bonn challenge to restore 150 million hectares of lost forests and degraded lands worldwide by 2020.

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Fecal matters - Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits?

Fecal matters - Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits? | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits?

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 850 billion gallons of untreated water pours into waterways each year from roughly 772 communities with combined sewer systems, mostly concentrated in the Northeast and Midwest. In the West, Oregon and Washington have the vast majority of combined sewer systems, with three and eleven respectively. The effects of such spills are varied, but include contaminated shellfish and fish kills, beach closure, gastrointestinal illness in swimmers and general unpleasantness. 

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3 ways for companies to protect water resources and save money - GreenBiz.com

3 ways for companies to protect water resources and save money - GreenBiz.com | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

The Carbon Disclosure Project and General Electric both released reports on water this week. While the focus of the reports varied—CDP looked at how many companies are tracking, reporting and doing something about their impact on water while GE surveyed the general public to gauge consumer attitudes about water usage—the conclusions were roughly the same: Everyone knows we need to do something about water consumption, and there are plenty of opportunities to do so profitably. Those opportunities break down generally into three categories: reducing usage, reusing water and improving infrastructure.

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190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year

190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year (RT @ClimateDesk: Wow: Antarctica is shedding an average of 190 million tonnes of ice every day.)...

Rapid melting in some parts of the continent is partially offset by heavy snowfalls elsewhere, meaning that the net loss of ice per year is about 69 billion tonnes.Previous studies had struggled to accurately map the land mass under most of Antarctica's huge ice shelves, and this knowledge is crucial to measuring the thickness of the ice.

As more ice melts, the land mass itself is gradually rising at a rate of about two millimetres per year, like a cake slowly baking in an oven.

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Enthusiastic Student Scientist Wins Attention for Promising Solar Clean Water Project

Enthusiastic Student Scientist Wins Attention for Promising Solar Clean Water Project | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Deepika Kurup's green and sustainable water purification project wins her honors as "America’s Top Young Scientist"...

Deepika designed a simple but elegant experiment. She created three UV-treatment vessels with catalytic rods: two using each photocatalyst on its own and a third with a combined TiO2-ZnO coating. A fourth plastic bottle without any photocatalyst served as a control. Deepika then sampled water from the bottles every three hours, using an incubator she developed herself to grow colonies in order to test the water contamination levels.

Deepika was able to prove that the combined TiO2-ZnO rods significantly accelerated the treatment time necessary to achieve clean water using the sun for treatment.

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Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlier - Capitol Weekly (It's the same here in the Philippines)

Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlier - Capitol Weekly (It's the same here in the Philippines) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlierCapitol WeeklyWater, always at the core of California's political and social fabric, is becoming even more precious as the population expands and the infrastructure withers.

In order to cover consistent costs with an inconsistent revenue source, rates have to go up. By demanding less water, the cities make it more expensive. Ratepayers, facing bills they often consider exorbitant -- $100 monthly tabs are not uncommon -- are not happy.

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'Tamban' fishing ban to begin Saturday

'Tamban' fishing ban to begin Saturday | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The BFAR sent off two motor vessels to sea in preparation for the implementation of the fishing ban on "tamban" or sardinella on Saturday, December 1.

A study presented by BFAR researchers established that the spawning season of the sardinella variety starts early December until late February. The ban will give time for the sardinella to reproduce, thus maintaining the abundance of their kind in the fishing grounds.

According to Industrial Group of Zamboanga’s Edgar Lim, the canning and the fishing companies in Zamboanga City support the ban, so as to maintain the benefits of the tamban in sardines manufacturing. There are over 15 plants in the city, gaining its title as the “Sardines Capital of the Philippines.”

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Acid Ocean Water Disolving Tiny Animals - the helpless victims of excess GHG

Acid Ocean Water Disolving Tiny Animals - the helpless victims of excess GHG | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The shell of a tiny snail that is an important food source for fish and birds in the water surrounding Antarctica is being dissolved in an ocean that is becoming more acidic due to climate change, new research shows.

Increasing carbonic acid levels in the world’s oceans are due to the water absorbing carbon dioxide from the air.

The source of that greenhouse gas is the burning of fossil fuels.

The water’s pH is now dropping faster than at any other time in the past 300 million years.

When this is combined with natural upwelling of more acidic waters from the deep, at least one creature has been found to be unable to cope with the more caustic waters.

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Ordinary People Helping Our Oceans in Extraordinary Ways - Natural Resources Defense Council (blog)

Ordinary People Helping Our Oceans in Extraordinary Ways - Natural Resources Defense Council (blog) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

And it turns out these insurance policies have made it this far in part thanks to concerned citizens who value the seas and want to help ensure their riches will be around for future generations.

Take, for example, “citizen scientists”—regular folks who give some of their time to help our scientific understanding of our coasts and oceans—who have played a huge part in making our marine protected areas and sanctuaries a success up and down the California coast.

In Monterey, scuba divers hovering above the sea floor record the number and types of fish, kelp, and invertebrates in different sections of the underwater parks. At the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, running along the northern and central California coast, volunteers have served as additional eyes and ears for the sanctuary for 20 years. As part of the Beach Watch program, volunteers survey beaches along the sanctuary’s boundaries, discovering and recording observations about the fish, animals, plants, and entire ecosystem itself. Throughout national marine sanctuaries nationwide, ordinary citizens have donated more than one million hours of their time, cleaned up more than 80,000 pounds of trash, and provided more than $15 million of in-kind support for our oceans.

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What is gray water and how is it helpful for the yard and garden? - by Richard Lindsay - Helium

What is gray water and how is it helpful for the yard and garden? - by Richard Lindsay - Helium | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Gray water is household water that can be used in the garden to water plants and trees. It is considered safe and contains very little bacterial o..., Richard Lindsay (What is gray water and how is it helpful for the yard and garden?

Gray water is water that has first been used in the house and then is reused outside for plants and trees. It is water that comes from bathroom sinks and showers, as well as from dishwashers and washing machines. This does not include water that is from the bathroom toilet because this water contains fecal matter that has the potential of containing hazardous bacterial organisms. Also, any water from the washing machine or sink that has been used to wash diapers is not allowed to be used, due to the bacteria from human waste.

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Top 5 steps to control water pollution | Environmental Pollution

Top 5 steps to control water pollution | Environmental Pollution | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Top five steps to control water pollution should be taken with the collaboration of all main stakeholders including households, farmers, industries, civic agencies and environmental watchdogs.
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Melting in the Andes: Goodbye glaciers - "How will this affect lives of millions?"

Melting in the Andes: Goodbye glaciers - "How will this affect lives of millions?" | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Researchers are racing to determine how shrinking glaciers in the Andes will affect the water supply of millions of people.

But although everyone fears a water shortage, they do not know how quickly it will come or how severe it will be.

An interdisciplinary team of scientists is now trying to provide some answers through a US$1-million project funded by the US National Science Foundation. The crew, which pulls together hydrologists, geochemists, geographers and historians, mainly from the United States and Canada, is tracking the fate of glacial meltwater as it runs from the mountains down to the ocean. Their goal is to develop models to forecast water flow and its effects on residents downstream. 

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Research Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously Feared - Current TV

Research Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously Feared - Current TV | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Science a GogoResearch Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously FearedCurrent TV"There is an Arctic sea ice connection," says Hay, despite the fact that melting sea ice - which is already in the ocean - does not itself raise sea...

The last official IPCC report in 2007 projected a global sea level rise between 0.2 and 0.5 meters by the year 2100. But current sea-level rise measurements meet or exceed the high end of that range and suggest a rise of one meter or more by the end of the century.

When sea ice melts, Hay explains, there is an oceanographic effect of releasing more fresh water from the Arctic, which is then replaced by inflows of brinier, warmer water from the south.

"So it's a big heat pump that brings heat to the Arctic," added Hay. "That's not in any of the models." That warmer water pushes the Arctic toward more ice-free waters, which absorb sunlight rather than reflect it back into space like sea ice does. The more open water there is, the more heat is trapped in the Arctic waters, and the warmer things can get.

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Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts say - Washington Post

Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts say - Washington Post | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts sayWashington PostAs the Northeast struggles with the aftermath of the massive storm Sandy, many experts say the government for years has underestimated how much of the nation is prone to flooding,...

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said policymakers need to acknowledge that the infrastructure in place along the East Coast cannot withstand the changing climate.

“Anyone who thinks that there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns is denying reality,” Cuomo said at a news conference Tuesday. “We have a new reality, and old infrastructures and old systems.”

Flood planning is based on historical data rather than future projections. And much of the infrastructure damaged in a storm is rebuilt exactly the same way, without taking into account the climatic changes underway.

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Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve - 2M sq.km., the world's largest

Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve - 2M sq.km., the world's largest | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve...

The wildlife rich Ross Sea, south-east of Australia, could have the world's largest single marine reserve, after New Zealand and the US are said to have overcome differences in fishing still to be conducted there.

As part of the nearly 2 million square kilometre reserve, a special scientific zone will be offered as an additional layer of protection, observers said.

A joint proposal by Australia, France and the European Union for a set of reserves covering 1.9 million square kilometres in the East Antarctic region is also before the meeting for decision this week.

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Can we protect 10 percent of the oceans? Momentum is growing.

Can we protect 10 percent of the oceans? Momentum is growing. | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
An international goal is to set aside 10 percent of coastal and marine waters as protected areas by 2020. Although much work remains to reach the goal, areas are being added at an accelerated pace.

Between 2003 and 2007, marine-protected areas grew at a rate of about 11.8 percent a year to cover about 2.5 million square kilometers (about 965,000 square miles). By 2010, protected areas covered about 4.8 million square kilometers, an average growth rate of 31 percent for each of the intervening three years. This year, protected areas cover about 8.2 million square kilometers, which would put the growth rate since 2010 at an average of 35 percent a year.

Over the next 12 to 24 months, another 5.2 million square kilometers could be added if Cook Islands, Australia, and New Caledonia follow through on their plans to establish or expand protected areas.

Protected areas are being added so fast that "you can't keep up to date with these things," Dr. Spalding says. "It's a huge acceleration."

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Environmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered Fish - Patch.com

Environmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered Fish - Patch.com | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Press-EnterpriseEnvironmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered FishPatch.comA federal lawsuit filed by a dozen Inland Empire water agencies challenging the Obama administration's decision to expand the habitat for an endangered fish species was...

According to a study by the Moreland, Idaho-based Western Legacy Alliance, which promotes private property rights, the Center for Biological Diversity filed more than 400 species protection-related lawsuits between 2001 and 2009.

A Wildlife Service spokeswoman said the critical habitat designation will not hinder agencies from drawing water from the Santa Ana or other areas where the sucker spawns; rather, the designation provides an "additional layer of review" before developers or municipalities can proceed with making any changes along channels recognized as critical to a threatened species.

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'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our Water - Care2.com (blog)

'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our Water - Care2.com (blog) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our WaterCare2.com (blog)Blocked from drifting into the air, these contaminants have simply found another way into our world, in the solid waste residue and wastewater produced by the facilities.

According to a Duke University-led study, North Carolina rivers and lakes downstream from the settling ponds of coal-fired power plants have dangerously high levels of cadmium, selenium, antimony and thallium. This result is unexpected, since local power plants were retrofitted with scrubbers and other technologies designed to reduce the health threat of coal fired power.

Blocked from drifting into the air, these contaminants have simply found another way into our world, in the solid waste residue and wastewater produced by the facilities. In fact, plants attempting to produce the mythical “clean coal” through the use of scrubbers and other flue gas desulfurization technologies could have greater concentrations of selenium and other contaminants in their wastewater than traditional facilities.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/clean-coal-is-poisoning-our-water.html#ixzz2A0GfvfpE

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