Water Stewardship
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Latest news on the state of the Earth's water resources.
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Farmers in Kansas are starting to adapt to declining stocks of groundwater - The Economist

Farmers in Kansas are starting to adapt to declining stocks of groundwater - The Economist | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Farmers in Kansas are starting to adapt to declining stocks of groundwater
The Economist
The market value of the agricultural output of the state's western congressional district is the highest in the country.
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Warming oceans may cause higher mercury levels in fish - Washington Times ("what about my seafood?")

Warming oceans may cause higher mercury levels in fish - Washington Times ("what about my seafood?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Washington Times Warming oceans may cause higher mercury levels in fish Washington Times WASHINGTON, October 4, 2013—Higher ocean surface temperatures triggered by global warming may cause fish to accumulate larger amounts of mercury, posing an...

Mercury pollution is mainly caused by coal-fired power plants, steel producers, incinerators, and cement makers that release it into the air. Other sources of mercury pollution are thermometers, batteries, consumer electronics and automotive parts that are manufactured, utilized or disposed of incorrectly. This pollution accumulates in oceans and waterways and is turned into methylmercury by bacteria found in the water.            

Moving its way up the food chain as larger fish eat smaller contaminated fish, mercury fails to dissolve and instead accumulates in a fish’s body at increasing levels. The mercury concentration in the bodies of large predatory fish who live a long time, including swordfish, tuna, mackerel and sharks, can be over 10,000 times higher than that of the surrounding environment, according to the Nature Conservancy.

Odorless and invisible, mercury in fish is difficult to detect and cannot be eliminated by trimming the skin or removing the bones. In the human body, mercury acts a neurotoxin that interferes with nervous system and brain functions.

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China's Disappearing Rivers: Is Climate Change to Blame? ("28,000 lost rivers?; progress gone wrong!")

China's Disappearing Rivers: Is Climate Change to Blame? ("28,000 lost rivers?; progress gone wrong!") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The government says global warming dried up its rivers. But they've ignored the impact of their giant dams and diversion channels.

China's recently published "water census" shows that as many as 28,000 rivers have vanishedfrom the country since the 1990s. It's a trend, the report suggests, that's likely to continue. But the causes of this problem are a little murkier. The "census" offers no reason for the disappearance of so many water sources.

In some places, like Minqin, where the Shiyang River has run dry, Beijing insists that climate change is to blame. Residents disagree. The government built a sizable upstream reservoir nearby two decades ago to irrigate a large farm. That cut off the water supply for residents.

"China is looking always at mega-projects rather than addressing the root causes," Zhou Lei, a fellow at Nanjing University who studies the affects of industry on the environment, tellsReuters. "They experiment with technologies to treat the problem, like the water transfer projects being done right now, but they are draining resources in a very wrong way."

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Fish farms cause relative sea-level rise ("as sea level rises slowly, land levels are sinking")

Fish farms cause relative sea-level rise ("as sea level rises slowly, land levels are sinking") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Aquaculture makes China's Yellow River delta sink.

Groundwater extraction for fish farms can cause land to sink at rates of a quarter-metre a year, according to a study of China’s Yellow River delta1. The subsidence is causing local sea levels to rise nearly 100 times faster than the global average.

Global sea levels are rising at about 3 millimetres a year owing to warming waters and melting ice. But some places are seeing a much faster rise — mainly because of sinking land. Bangkok dropped by as much as 12 centimetres a year in the 1980s thanks to groundwater pumping. Oil fields near Houston, Texas, experienced a similar drop during the 1920s because of oil extraction. Deltas can also sink as old river sediments compact under their own weight and water carrying replacement sediments is held back by dams or diverted for irrigation. “You can get crazy rates of sea-level rise,” says James Syvitski, a geologist at the University of Colorado Boulder and a co-author of the study, published online in Geophysical Research Letters1.

The researchers found that parts of the Yellow River delta are dropping by up to 25 centimetres a year, probably because of groundwater extraction for onshore fish tanks. The link between aquaculture and subsidence has attracted little international notice. “This is a new one on me,” says Stephen Brown, a fisheries scientist at the US National Marine Fisheries Service in Silver Spring, Maryland. “We are concerned about the effect of sea-level rise on fish; not the other way around,” he says.

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Scientists Have Found a Huge Underground Water Reserve in Kenya ("but they shouldn't use it up!")

Scientists Have Found a Huge Underground Water Reserve in Kenya ("but they shouldn't use it up!") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
This is incredible. Scientists have found an underground water reserve in Kenya so large that it could meet the entire country's water needs for the next 70 years. Using satellite, radar and geological technology, scientists ...
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Coral will dissolve if CO2 emissions don't change - The Conversation ("killing me softly")

Coral will dissolve if CO2 emissions don't change - The Conversation ("killing me softly") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Sky News Australia
Coral will dissolve if CO2 emissions don't change
The Conversation
The world's coral reefs will quickly dissolve if greenhouse gas emissions continue on current trends, a new simulation has found.

Greenhouse gases cause the ocean to become warmer and more acidic, which bleaches and kills coral reefs, as well as the underwater ecosystems that form around them.

The new study, led by researchers from the University of Queensland and published in the journal PNAS, found that even modest increases in ocean temperature and acidity would kill off coral and increase the dissolution of their skeletons once they are dead.

“We discovered that coral reefs under the business-as-usual-emission scenario, the one we are on, show high rates of decalcification,” said lead author of the study, Associate Professor Sophie Dove from UQ’s School of Biological Sciences.

“Essentially, dissolving before our eyes over a few months.”

The study involved controlling the temperature and amount of CO2 in water that was home to a section of coral reef at UQ’s Heron Island research centre.

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Daily Kos: China's water pollution off the charts, must outsource food ... ("growth vs clean food")

Daily Kos: China's water pollution off the charts, must outsource food ... ("growth vs clean food") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Livestock pollution stays in U.S.; pork chops go to China. With its successful bid to purchase the U.S. pork giant Smithfield, which is pending U.S. governmental approval, China has revealed its major vulnerability—that of ...

In a stunning piece, Bloomberg details China's predicament as a coal/water dilemma. In order to continue its manufacturing miracle unabated, China must rely on the use of coal, its number one energy source. Coal requires a massive use of water both in mining and in burning. Coal industries and power stations use as much as 17 percent of China’s water.

About half of China’s rivers have dried up since 1990 and those that remain are mostly contaminated. Without enough water, coal can’t be mined, new power stations can’t run and the economy can’t grow. At least 80 percent of the nation’s coal comes from regions where the United Nations says water supplies are either “stressed” or in “absolute scarcity.”

China has about 1,730 cubic meters of fresh water per person, close to the 1,700 cubic meter-level the UN deems “stressed.” The situation is worse in the north, where half China’s people, most of its coal and only 20 percent of its water are located.

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Japanese nuke water leak fears up - New York Daily News ("radioactive water scare now real")

Japanese nuke water leak fears up - New York Daily News ("radioactive water scare now real") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
New York Daily News Japanese nuke water leak fears up New York Daily News Radioactive water leaking into the ocean from a Japanese power plant that was devastated during the 2011 earthquake has been classified as a level 3 “serious incident” on an...

The Nuclear Regulation Authority heightened its warnings about the toxic site, run by the Tokyo Electric Power Co., after reports last week that a storage tank was oozing 300 metric tons of radioactive water into the Pacific.

The level 3 warning is the most serious threat level the authority has assigned to the site since the meltdown of three reactors during the earthquake and tsunami two years ago.

For the past two years, Tepco has stored hundreds of thousands of tons of toxic water in tanks on the site.

Hundreds of those tanks were meant to serve as temporary storage after the power plant meltdowns but are still being used and now leaking.

Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry “is working to draw up, by some time in September, both emergency measures and more fundamental steps to eliminate the roots of the contaminated water problem, as well as measures to be carried out going forward,” the prime minister’s office said.

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India bans shark 'finning' to protect endangered species from indiscriminate hunting

India bans shark 'finning' to protect endangered species from indiscriminate hunting | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
India has banned hunting sharks for only their fins in a move to protect endangered species swimming near its shores from indiscriminate hunting.

NEW DELHI -- India has banned hunting sharks for only their fins in a move to protect endangered species swimming near its shores from indiscriminate hunting.

The practice of shark "finning," or slicing off a shark's fins and throwing it back to die slowly on the ocean floor, has exploded worldwide thanks to demand from China, where shark fin soup is considered a delicacy.

India is one of the world's largest shark-catching nations, with several of the species in its waters endangered.

The Environment Ministry says fishermen now found with hauls including detatched fins risk up to seven years in prison for hunting an endangered species.

Conservationists have applauded the ministry's move as key to ending a cruel practice threatening some sharks with extinction.

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To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration by Cheryl Katz: Yale Environment 360

To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration by Cheryl Katz: Yale Environment 360 | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The Netherlands’ system of dikes and sea gates has long been the best in the world.

This is the Sand Engine, one of the latest innovations from Dutch masters of flood control technology and designed, as the national water boardRijkswaterstaat says, so that “nature will take the sand to the right place for us.” After having constructed the country’s vaunted system of sea gates and dikes, Dutch planners and engineers are now augmenting it with new technology enlisting nature to keep the water at bay.

The Sand Engine is the signature project of Building with Nature, a consortium of Dutch industries, universities, research institutes, and public water agencies looking to harness natural systems for next-generation hydraulic engineering. Completed in late 2011 at a cost of 50 million euros ($67 million), the Sand Engine’s goal is to provide long-term fortification for eroding beaches as ocean currents gradually redistribute its dredged material. Until now, this coastline needed sand replenishment every five years, requiring expensive dredging that damaged marine ecosystems. The Sand Engine will feed beaches for about 20 years at half the price, said Marcel Stive, chair of coastal engineering at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) and principal creator of the technology.
“At this moment, this is the safest coast we have,” Stive said. When the sand is fully spread out, it will protect 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) of shoreline from the current rate of sea-level rise, he said. If the amount of water increases, “we’ll just add more.”

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Innovation for Clean Water in Africa - ("Coke-EDNP project is building ram pump water assocs too")

Innovation for Clean Water in Africa - ("Coke-EDNP project is building ram pump water assocs too") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Huffington Post
Innovation for Clean Water in Africa
Huffington Post
We take clean water for granted. We turn a faucet and clean water magically appears. That's not the case for over a billion people around the globe.

Diana is working with the local district government to institute a "pay-as-you-fetch" system. Under this system, a water entrepreneur is granted responsibility for individual wells by the local government. He or she has the authority to charge a fee of 100 Ugandan Shilling (4 cents) per Jerry can, which is five percent of household income. The water entrepreneur has the responsibility to maintain and rehabilitate the well. Since a well needs to be completely rehabilitated about once a decade, half of the revenues are placed into a savings account that can only be tapped for this purpose.

A key aspect to the pay-as-you-fetch system is the installation of a low tech, but innovative piece of technology. Each of well is fitted with a tamperproof water meter that tracks the flow. This ensures that revenues are collected and the proper amount is set aside in an account for future repairs. Surprisingly, the transparent measurement of water flow at the source has never been done before.

The net result is consistent access to clean water. Last week one well broke down, but rather than being abandoned, it was up and running in a matter of hours. Wilson, a local resident commented, "when you transfer ownership from the government to a human being, he makes sure that the water keeps flowing, because if it doesn't flow his family doesn't eat."

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Wrecked Fukushima nuke plant leaking 330 tons of contaminated water a day ("for past 2 years!!!")

Wrecked Fukushima nuke plant leaking 330 tons of contaminated water a day ("for past 2 years!!!") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday ordered increased efforts to stop radiation-contaminated water from spilling into the Pacific Ocean from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant.

A government official told reporters Wednesday that an estimated 300 metric tons (330 tons) of contaminated water was leaking into the ocean every day from the Daiichi plant, which was devastated by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, Reuters reported.

The official also said the government believed the leaks had been happening for two years.

The plant’s operators Tokyo Electric Power Company has been building an underground wall by injecting “liquid glass” into the ground in an attempt to contain the contaminated water.

TEPCO has insisted that so far the level of contamination in the ocean does not pose a risk to health.

But some of the contaminated water has made its way through parts of the underground barrier and started to rise above ground.

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Mangroves could survive sea-level rise if protected ("against humans?!?") | University of ...

Mangroves could survive sea-level rise if protected ("against humans?!?") | University of ... | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Human activity is currently a bigger threat to mangroves, and the natural defences they provide against storm surges and other coastal disasters, than rising sea levels, according to a new study. Although we can expect some ...

The survey warns that human activity on land – such as the damming up of rivers or the felling of trees to create shrimp ponds – is currently a far greater threat to many mangrove habitats than the effects of climate change on sea level.

Mangroves – trees and shrubs which grow in saltwater, coastal environments – play a critical role in protecting thousands of shoreline communities in tropical and subtropical regions from floods, storms, and other hazards.

Their densely-packed, overground root systems can absorb wave energy and reduce the velocity of a sudden surge of water. In the 2004 tsunami, for example, mangroves were sometimes the difference between life and death for people whose homes lay in the path of the giant waves which crashed into shorelines around South Asia.

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lyn chatfield's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 PM

 The critical role of mangroves and the threats to their existance.

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Wave of jellyfish shuts down Swedish nuke reactor ("nature brings down a behemoth; not the last time")

Wave of jellyfish shuts down Swedish nuke reactor ("nature brings down a behemoth; not the last time") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
It wasn't a tsunami but it had the same effect: A huge cluster of jellyfish forced one of the world's largest nuclear reactors to shut down -- a phenomenon that marine biologists say could become more common.

Operators of the Oskarshamn nuclear plant in southeastern Sweden had to scramble reactor number three on Sunday after tons of jellyfish clogged the pipes that bring in cool water to the plant's turbines.

Jellyfish are not a new problem for nuclear power plants. Last year the California-based Diablo Canyon facility had to shut its reactor two after gobs of sea salp -- a gelatinous, jellyfish-like organism -- clogged intake pipes. In 2005, the first unit at Oskarshamn was temporarily turned off due to a sudden jellyfish influx.

Nuclear power plants need a constant flow of water to cool their reactor and turbine systems, which is why many such plants are built near large bodies of water.

Marine biologists, meanwhile, say they would not be surprised if more jellyfish shutdowns occur in the future.


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The "Deadly Trio" of Carbon Dioxide Threatens the World's Oceans - Motherboard (blog)

The "Deadly Trio" of Carbon Dioxide Threatens the World's Oceans - Motherboard (blog) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Sky News Australia The "Deadly Trio" of Carbon Dioxide Threatens the World's Oceans Motherboard (blog) “At carbon dioxide concentrations of 450-500 ppm (projected in 2030-2050) erosion will exceed calcification in the coral reef building process,...

Earth’s oceans are currently more acidic than they have been in at least 300 million years, according to a report released today by the International Program on the State of the Ocean (IPSO). If that's the case, it's a condition that may have shoved us mostly unawares into the next great extinction event. 

The IPSO researchers explain that acidification is one of three primary symptoms currently threatening our planet’s waters. The other two members of what they coined the “deadly trio” are ocean warming and deoxygenation. While all three have their own unique and detrimental effects on the ocean, they are all connected by a single source of causation: carbon dioxide.

Beyond their common carbon history, this triad is otherwise significant because “most, if not all, of the Earth’s five past mass extinction events have involved at least one of these three symptoms of global carbon perturbations," reads the report. But how did it get this way?

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Overheated rivers are killing our endangered crayfish - Irish Independent ("slow kill")

Overheated rivers are killing our endangered crayfish - Irish Independent ("slow kill") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Irish Independent Overheated rivers are killing our endangered crayfish Irish Independent TWO major fish kills in Irish waters that also wiped out large numbers of globally endangered white-clawed crayfish are being blamed on rivers and lakes...

Unseasonal high temperatures, combined with compromised water quality and low levels after a dry spell sucked the oxygen out of a river in Longford and a Leitrim lake.

More than 2,000 fish – including brown trout, roach, pike, eel and white-clawed crayfish – were among the species found dead on a 6km stretch of the Camolin River, a Shannon tributary, downstream from Longford town.

Blue/green algae has recently bloomed in the lake. As Lough Keeldra is a designated bathing area, Leitrim Co Council has banned swimming until the cause of the fish kill is fully identified.

"After a prolonged period of low flow levels and unseasonably high water temperatures, all aquatic life but especially fish are extremely vulnerable to the slightest deterioration in water quality," a spokeswoman told the Sunday Independent.

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How To Get Drinking Water From Fog ("timely gadget as precipitation increases due to global warming")

"A fog-harvesting system that is up to five times more efficient than previous systems at turning airborne water into drinking water has been developed by researchers at MIT in collaboration with colleagues in Chile." Cenk Uygur and Desi Doyen (Green News Report) discuss this story and other green energy stories.

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Ocean acidification threatens Alaska's multimillion-dollar crab industry - Yakima Herald-Republic

Ocean acidification threatens Alaska's multimillion-dollar crab industry - Yakima Herald-Republic | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Ocean acidification threatens Alaska's multimillion-dollar crab industry
Yakima Herald-Republic
A crew member aboard the Arctic Hunter beats ice from the knuckle boom before using it to pull crab pots aboard.

New research earlier this year shows that Bristol Bay red king crab — the supersized monster that has come to symbolize the fortunes of Alaska’s crab fleet — could fall victim to the changing chemistry of the oceans.

Barring a hasty reduction in carbon-dioxide emissions — or evidence that the creatures could acclimate to changing sea conditions — a team of scientists fears Alaska’s $100 million red king crab fishery could crash in decades to come.

That grim possibility also raises alarm about the crab fleet’s other major moneymaker, snow crab.

“With red king crab, it’s all doom and gloom,” said Robert Foy, who oversaw the crab research for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Kodiak, Alaska. “With snow crab, there’s so little known we just can’t say. But we don’t see anything from our experience that’s good for any of these crab. Some is just not as bad as others.”

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The Ogallala Aquifer, an important water resource, is in trouble - Kansas City Star ("a finite source")

The Ogallala Aquifer, an important water resource, is in trouble - Kansas City Star ("a finite source") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Kansas City Star The Ogallala Aquifer, an important water resource, is in trouble Kansas City Star The life of the Ogallala Aquifer could be extended several decades, but only if water usage is reduced, a four-year study by researchers from Kansas...

The aquifer yields 30 percent of the nation’s irrigated groundwater, the study said. It could last until 2110 or longer if farmers were to cut 20 percent of their usage or more beginning now. But that would reduce agriculture production to the levels of 15 or 20 years ago.

The study was done because there are a lot of questions about “how long can we pump and how long it will take to recharge the aquifer if depleted,” Steward said.

At the current rate, the aquifer will be 70 percent depleted by 2060, according to the study.

Kansas in recent years has begun trying to come up with ways to keep the lake recharging at a rate that doesn’t allow the resource to dry up.

 
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Water Conference Opens in Stockholm With Wise Supply Plea - Bloomberg ("global cooperation urgent")

Water Conference Opens in Stockholm With Wise Supply Plea - Bloomberg ("global cooperation urgent") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Water Conference Opens in Stockholm With Wise Supply Plea Bloomberg World Water Week opened today in Stockholm with a plea for the energy, food and water industries to use scarce supplies more wisely and to clean up contaminated waters that help...

“Mortgaging our future by draining water from the ground, surface and sky faster than it can be replaced by nature is untenable,” said Torgny Holmgren, executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute, or SIWI.

Global water consumption is growing twice as fast as the population, creating supply and demand imbalances, according to Xylem Inc. (XYL), the water company spun off by ITT Corp. Solutions include conservation, reuse and desalination systems to address the issue of reduced water quantity and quality, it said.

With the global population due to surpass 9 billion by 2050, “for the sake of the generations to come, we need to change the way the world uses water,” Holmgren said in opening remarks to a conference that drew 2,500 water experts, energy, power-generation, chemical, food and water-technology industries as well as organizations including the United Nations.

“For the Palestinian farmers that cannot access water to irrigate their fields or for the marshes in Iraq that are not receiving enough water, improved and more effective cooperation is the key,” SIWI authors including Holmgren wrote in a report issued today.

“Lack of sanitation has a direct impact on health, nutrition, education, women’s and girl’s rights and poverty reduction,” UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said. “We cannot accept that 2.5 billion people worldwide lack access to a clean and safe toilet and that over 1 billion defecate in the open.”

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Pollution from Asia Linked to High Mercury Levels in Pacific Fish - Nature World News

Pollution from Asia Linked to High Mercury Levels in Pacific Fish - Nature World News | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Nature World News
Pollution from Asia Linked to High Mercury Levels in Pacific Fish
Nature World News
Getting India and China to reduce their mercury emissions will likely lead to healthier fish in the Pacific.

A new study has found that mercury levels in fish that are caught off the coast of Hawaii are high due to toxins released from Asian countries. Researchers have even predicted that levels of mercury in North Pacific fish will rise with increase in global pollution.

The study was conducted by researchers at University of Michigan and their colleagues at University of Hawaii who found that about 80 percent of all methylmercury found in deep-water fish is produced by bacteria that reside deep in the ocean. Methylmercury is a toxic form of mercury. Their research also found that nearly all the mercury found in Pacific fish likely comes via air before being deposited on ocean surface.

"The implications are that if we're going to effectively reduce the mercury concentrations in open-ocean fish, we're going to have to reduce global emissions of mercury, including emissions from places like China and India," Blum said in a news release. "Cleaning up our own shorelines is not going to be enough. This is a global atmospheric problem."

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How tiny plankton could give global warming a significant boost ("acidification for the worse")

How tiny plankton could give global warming a significant boost ("acidification for the worse") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that as oceans become more acidic, plankton could produce less of a compound that is key to cloud formation. Clouds help keep earth cool.

That possibility is raised in a new study that suggests that the activities of a tiny plankton – affected by the growing acidity of the world's oceans – could raise average global temperatures by as much as 1 degree Fahrenheit above current estimates.

"I don't think any of the previous modeling includes the effect of acidification on biological feedbacks" to the atmosphere, says Dr. Feely, who was not a member of the research team.

This "biological feedback" involves a compound produced by the plankton, called (rather unmercifully) dimethylsulfoniopropionate. Mercifully, scientists have reduced the name to the acronym: DMSP.

DMSP breaks down into forms that, once they reach the atmosphere, are readily converted into tiny aerosol particles. These aerosols, in turn, serve as the seeds for thick, low-level clouds over the ocean – clouds that are effective at reflecting sunlight back into space.

Acidification occurs as the oceans take up a significant portion of the rising levels of carbon dioxide that human activities emit. No one expects the seas to mimic battery acid. But while the changes are undetectable to anyone wading in the surf from one year to the next, they are daunting to marine organisms that have adapted to a very narrow range of pH levels, a measure of relative acidity, in seawater.


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Gibraltar row: Spain 'misinformed' over artificial reef - The Guardian ("another case of politics?")

Gibraltar row: Spain 'misinformed' over artificial reef - The Guardian ("another case of politics?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Gibraltar row: Spain 'misinformed' over artificial reef
The Guardian
In a column in the Wall Street Journal García-Margallo also wrote: "The dumping of concrete blocks constitutes a violation of the most basic rules of environmental conservation.

Spain's demands that Gibraltar dismantles the artificial reef at the centre of a diplomatic spat with Britain have been dismissed as "misinformed" by the reef's creator after it emerged that there have been no complaints made about it in over 30 years, its construction mostly benefits the Spanish fishing industry and Spain has received millions of euros from the EU to create similar reefs of its own.

"There was just sand before and no life. So we tried to provide an oasis by dropping old boats there. It is now a fish nursery. Bream and, in season, tuna spawn there, as well as invertebrates. It's like we have put in a block of flats and [marine life] has moved in. The reef has no intention beyond conservation."

The artificial reef, which has been extended to stretch much of the way around the tiny territory, was the first to be constructed in Europe and is now one of Europe's biggest. It is made of over 30 scuttled vessels and wrecks, including old boats, gravel barges, and floating platforms. It is extended when funds are available or old boats are donated to conservation charity The Helping Hand, which dropped the concrete blocks earlier this year.


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Warming seas pushing marine life to the poles - MSN News (good-bye tropical fish, see you at poles")

Warming seas pushing marine life to the poles - MSN News (good-bye tropical fish, see you at poles") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
MSN News
Warming seas pushing marine life to the poles
MSN News
Experts had expected the migratory shift of marine life due to warming seas to be slower than that of land species, but they said the opposite is happening.

Warming seas are forcing marine life to shift toward the poles in search of cooler water at an alarming rate, according to a new study.

Breeding and feeding patterns are also changing, "potentially triggering a range of cascading effects" and a "reconfiguration of marine ecosystems" in the not too distant future, the researchers reported in the latest edition of Nature Climate Change.

The experts had expected the migratory shift to be slower than that of land species, but they said the opposite is happening.

The marine species most impacted are moving toward the north or south poles at an average of 45 miles per decade, "considerably faster than terrestrial species, which are moving poleward" at about 4 miles per decade, study co-author Elvira Poloczanska said in a statement.

"This is occurring even though sea surface temperatures are warming three times slower than land temperatures," added Poloczanska, a researcher with Australia's national science agency.

"We expected to see more rapid response on land than in the ocean" because the air is warming faster than the seas, study co-author Christopher Brown, a researcher at Australia's University of Queensland, told The Guardian of London.

The faster ocean shift might be because marine animals are able to move vast distances, Brown said, or it could be that land species can adapt by moving shorter distances since they can find cooler temperatures by migrating up or down hills and valleys.

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Your Pee is Pollution ("includes all the drugs we take in and pee out; fish start acting weird...")

Ever wonder what happens after you flush? You should, because your pee is causing problems! Hank talks about how, and why, human waste is having weird effect...

 

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