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Concern mounts over ‘dead rivers’ - philippines.ucanews.com

Concern mounts over ‘dead rivers’ - philippines.ucanews.com | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Environmental group Greenpeace has welcomed recent government moves to address water pollution in the country, but said more must be done to save poll

The Environment Department has declared seven bodies of water as WQMAs. These are the Sinocalan-Dagupan river system in Pangasinan, the Marilao-Meycauayan-Obando river system and areas within the Laguna Lake Development Authority’s jurisdiction in Luzon, the Tigum-Aganan watershed and the Iloilo-Batiano river system in the Visayas, and the Silway River and the Sarangani Bay in Mindanao.

“Access to clean water is a fundamental human right and it is the duty of the government to guarantee this,” Paje said, adding that access to safe drinking water and sanitation is among the United Nations’ eight Millennium Development Goals.

Water pollution is one of the biggest problems affecting the Philippines. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources says at least 50 of the country’s 421 rivers are considered “biologically dead.”

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WARNING | PH seeing highest sea level rise in the world - thrice the global average, in fact

WARNING | PH seeing highest sea level rise in the world - thrice the global average, in fact | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The Philippines has seen three times the global average in sea level rise, exacerbating its vulnerability to natural disasters, climate experts said at a conference in Paris this week.

Michael Williams of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said the Philippines posted the highest average increase in sea levels, at 60 cms, against the global average of 19 cms since the year 1901.

It is a "major force of nature" against which countries like the Philippines can do little, but, said Williams, "there's a lot to be done with disaster risk prevention, alert systems, and so forth. But you have to understand that there is that additional risk."

Williams elaborated: "The global average of sea level rise since the year 1900 or 1901 has been 19 cm for the last hundred and fifteen years. However that varies widely from region to region, because of wind, because of currents in the ocean, because of changes in the land which rises and falls. So it so happens that in the area of the Philippines, where the cyclone happened last year, probably because of the trade winds and the currents of the Pacific, you have a massive amount of water between the Philippines and where the winds are pushing the water. The sea level rise, according to several of the stations we have operational there, is much much more than the global average. It's more like 60cm, and it's the highest sea level rise in the world."

According to van Ypersele, the Philippines is greatly affected by rising sea levels around the world, and because of this, even stronger storms in the future could wreak even greater damage on the country. Notably, typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) last Nov. 8 was declared earliler the strongest cyclone to hit any part of the globe for 2013, drawing a Category 5 ranking from meteorologists. Asked how the Philippines can brace for the worst, he said there’s  no other way than to drastically change the way structures are built in coastal areas.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The Philippines makes another Guinness world record - the highest sea level rise!

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How to fix the 10 worst wastes of water ("a lot of work still to be done by both business & consumers")

How to fix the 10 worst wastes of water ("a lot of work still to be done by both business & consumers") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Nike, Coca-Cola, Levi Strauss and Microsoft are working to curb water-guzzling practices in textiles, bottling, irrigation and beyond. 

Globally speaking, water scarcity is an even more acute concern — one under the microscope this weekend at dozens of World Water Day events and scrutinized in the latest update to the United Nations World Water Development report. By 2025, the United Nations figures that nearly half of the world's pollution will live in water-stressed regions, making solutions to this challenge the focus for an emerging wave of technology and infrastructure services companies.

There are many reasons sustainability executives are watching water far more closely and seeking to reduce their organizations' consumption — such as shifting climate patterns, rising populations and the expansion of emerging economies. While some of these things may seem beyond our immediate control, there are factors exacerbating the situation that we can influence more directly — for good or for bad.

By moving to eliminate some of these wasteful practices, businesses and communities could help divert potable resources where they might have a more positive impact. With that in mind, here are 10 common practices making the water picture worse (in no particular order), along with some ideas for addressing them. 

Bert Guevara's insight:

We have to get serious on clean water management. The 10 cases enumerated in this article shows that much has to be done by both business and the consumers.

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The Water Food Energy Nexus - an animation - YouTube

Water, food and energy are interconnected: agriculture accounts for about 70% of global freshwater use and can pollute freshwater supplies if mismanaged. Wat...

The theme of this year's World Water Day is Water and Energy, because those two issues are not only closely interlinked, but also interdependent, and addressing them both is the only way forward. To learn more about the relationship between those seemingly disparate issues, watch and share this Water & Energy video playlist:

Bert Guevara's insight:

The theme of this year's World Water Day is Water and Energy, because those two issues are not only closely interlinked, but also interdependent, and addressing them both is the only way forward. To learn more about the relationship between those seemingly disparate issues, watch and share this Water & Energy video playlist:

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Vast Underwater Survey Identifies Five Keys to Conserving Ocean Life ("blindness will hurt future")

Vast Underwater Survey Identifies Five Keys to Conserving Ocean Life ("blindness will hurt future") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Dozens of volunteer divers surveyed marine protected areas worldwide, to discover why life flourishes in some while failing in others.

Oceans cover 70 percent of the Earth. Somewhat less than 2 percent of that area has been set aside in marine protected areas: refuges where sea life is supposed to be able to thrive free of human pressures. But the reality is that many of them are “paper parks,” with no enforcement of fishing bans. Others are beset with polluted runoff from populated areas, or too small to protect wide-ranging fish species.

A newly published, 6-year global survey of 1,000 sites in 87 marine protected areas across 40 countries has found that at least 4 of 5 key factors must be present for a marine reserve to succeed:

No harvest (or "take") of fish and other sea lifeEnforcement to prevent illegal fishingIn existence for more than 10 yearsLarge enough to protect far-ranging speciesIsolated from unprotected marine areas by sand or deep water

The researchers shorthand these features as “NEOLI”: no take, enforced, old, large and isolated.

Bert Guevara's insight:

What we don't see will soon hurt us.

"The destruction of the undersea environment 'wouldn't be tolerated, if people could see and know the scale of what's happening.'"

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Current events: Antarctic climate change is messing with the motion of the ocean ("ice melt result")

Current events: Antarctic climate change is messing with the motion of the ocean ("ice melt result") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The ocean's coldest, saltiest waters are disappearing -- thanks to Antarctic currents shutting down.

Researchers have been scratching their heads at the disappearance of the coldest, saltiest seawater over last couple of decades. Historically, this “Antarctic Bottom Water” originates in the Weddell and Ross Seas when it cools in polynya — areas of open water in which sea ice does not form — and then sinks down into the deep. After, it roams the Earth on a sort of “ocean conveyor belt,” taking almost 1,000 years to return from where it came, distributing yummy nutrients (at least I imagine they taste good if you’re plankton) and helping to keep the Earth’s climate in check along the way. But scientific sleuths think they’ve now solved the mystery of the vanishing waters: Climate change is causing more precipitation over the southern ocean, shutting down the normal mixing process.

Why? Because of density. Normally, the Weddell Sea’s surface waters are denser (because they’re colder, thanks to cooling off in the polynya) than what’s below, causing them to sink down and form Antarctic Bottom Water. But now, the increased renewal of super-fresh stuff keeps the Weddell Sea’s surface water density low, so it just stays on top instead of replenishing the Antarctic Bottom Water stores below. “I like to say it’s like a bottle of Italian salad dressing — so it separates between the dense stuff underneath and the less dense stuff on top,” says Eric Galbraith, assistant professor of Earth System Dynamics at McGill and coauthor of the new paper.

Bert Guevara's insight:

With so much fresh water from melted polar ice seeping into the ocean, something's gotta give.

This time, melted fresh water is overwhelming ocean salt water, so much so that the interaction of cold and warm ocean currents is being affected. Read more.

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River barrier erected to protect endangered fish - fox13now.com ("solving a human intrusion")

River barrier erected to protect endangered fish - fox13now.com ("solving a human intrusion") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
River barrier erected to protect endangered fish
fox13now.com
WASHINGTON COUNTY – A new and improved seven-foot wall spans the Virgin River along the Utah and Arizona border.

The concrete barrier is designed to keep invasive fish out of the Utah section of the Virgin River, specifically the red shiner. The red shiner was introduced into the area by fisherman several decades ago and is a threat to the endangered woundfin minnow. The Washington County Water Conservancy District spent close to $400,000 to improve the structure.

“The goal is to save the woundfin minnow going downstream, all the way through its habitat in the Virgin River,” WCWCD Associate General Manager Barbara Hjelle said. “In order to do that, we have to stop that upstream migration of the red shiner.”

Major efforts over the past 10 years have completely eliminated the red shiner, at least from the Utah section of the river. Meisner saidd barriers like this will go far in keeping that fish out and protecting the fragile ecosystem that exists along the Virgin River.

“This whole area in Washington County is kind of the convergence of different geographical regions,” Meisner said. You’ve got The Great Basin, The Colorado Plateau, The Mojave Desert. All are very close to Washington County.

The wall is actually an upgrade to one that’s spanned the river since the 1980s. The upgrades are meant to improve the function, while also keeping the minnow in from being washed downstream.

Bert Guevara's insight:

When man introduces non-native fish into the water, the indigenous fish species are threatened. This is also happening in many parts of the Philippines, especially in lakes crowded with fish pens. These fish pens breed commercial species which disregard biodiversity considerations.

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 9, 10:46 PM

When man introduces non-native fish into the water, the indigenous fish species are threatened. This is also happening in many parts of the Philippines, especially in lakes crowded with fish pens. These fish pens breed commercial species which disregard biodiversity considerations.

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Drought forces Malaysia to expand water rationing ("water supply down to 50% & summer is yet to come")

Drought forces Malaysia to expand water rationing ("water supply down to 50% & summer is yet to come") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Malaysia will expand water rationing in and around its capital Kuala Lumpur, as a drought continues to affect millions.

The National water commission said over 300,000 households in Kuala Lumpur and nearby Selangor, will experience cuts for the whole of March, after a two-month dry spell depleted reservoirs.

According to the commission, another 50,000 premises in the southern state of Johor have also undergone rationing last week, as much of Malaysia suffers under bone-dry conditions and high temperatures.

"The hot weather and lack of rain in catchment areas have caused all reservoirs in Selangor to recede," said the commission's chairman Ismail Kasim.

Malaysia tends to experience dry weather early in the year, but the current spell has been unusually long, sparking bushfires and protests from communities whose taps have run dry.

The Malaysian Meteorological Department has warned the dry patch could last another month.

The Malaysian economy remains reliant on agriculture - it is the world's second-largest producer of palm oil and a major exporter of rubber.


Bert Guevara's insight:

Cases of drought sweeping the U.S. and Asia at the start of 2014. This is not good for the Philippines which anticipates an El Niño season this year. What have we done to prepare?

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Large fish have disappeared from vast tracts of Australian coast, survey shows ("undersea casualties")

Large fish have disappeared from vast tracts of Australian coast, survey shows ("undersea casualties") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Climate change looms as greatest of threats, which also include fishing and pollution, says survey co-founder

"We found very large areas of dead coral around the Montebello Islands, off northwest WA, which is a protected area," he said. "Previously, this area was very rich in coral but it looks like it has been impacted by heatwaves in that area.
"In the Coral sea, the fish life was good but the condition of the reefs themselves surprised me. I expected to see a lot more coral than there was, possibly because of the number of cyclones that have passed through there."

"Over the next 50 to 100 years, climate change is the grand-daddy threat, no doubt," Edgar said. "The east and west coasts of Australia have both seen an increase of water temperature, of around 1.5C in the last 50 years.
"What's happening in the sea is out of sight but there are massive changes happening under the surface. There isn't much information on the biology down there, which is why it's invaluable to have this baseline data to measure against. There are massive changes taking place to the biology of the inshore system but no-one notices."

Bert Guevara's insight:

The bigger fish species are the first casualties of a damaged ocean. It is happening everywhere, not only in Australia. That includes the Philippines.

"Vast tracts of Australia's coastline have been denuded of large fish, withmarine life under pressure from climate change, over-fishing, pollution and invasive species, a year-long study has found."

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10 marine species on the brink of mass extinction due to ocean acidification

10 marine species on the brink of mass extinction due to ocean acidification | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Perhaps nowhere else is the immediacy of carbon emissions apparent than in the world's oceans. Just a minor change in the ocean's PH balance means mass death for these species.


The ocean is a delicate place, and tiny changes to its composition can cause serious devastation.
Adding carbon to the atmosphere contributes to global warming and climate change. Another less-discussed impact is ocean acidification—whereby carbon molecules diffuse into the ocean from the atmosphere, causing a steady rise in acidity—even though the impacts are already being felt by many species.
The beautiful blue sea slug, seen here, is one such creature. Blue sea slugs feed on the poisonous Portuguese man of war jellyfish, meaning that an ocean without them would be an ocean with a lot more stinging jellyfish.


Via Kathy Dowsett
Bert Guevara's insight:

Once made extinct, they disappear forever. We haven't even fully discovered why they exist, yet human activity causes ocean acidification  which causes extinction of sensitive marine life. 

Life goes on for land creatures but our sea neighbors are struggling to escape extinction. 

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A Monstrous Mess: toxic water pollution in China ("noone seems to care though kids are wondering")

A Monstrous Mess: toxic water pollution in China ("noone seems to care though kids are wondering") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
A team from Greenpeace East Asia's Detox campaign recently discovered an unsettling sight off the coast of South Eastern China. Next to the city of Shishi, a centre for children's clothing production, they discovered a huge black plume of wastewater around the size of 50 Olympic swimming pools on the sea's surface; a large dark scar on the water easily visible via satellite imagery.

Further research indicated that this plume was coming out of a discharge pipe from the Wubao Dyeing Industrial zone and more specifically, the Haitian Environmental Engineering Co. Ltd wastewater treatment plant which serves 19 of Shishi's textile dyeing facilities.

The toxic water pollution scandal uncovered at Wubao, Shishi is just the tip of the iceberg. In China alone there are 435 discharge points like the one serving Wubao, spanning the coast and releasing 32.2 billion tons of wastewater into the sea each year. In 2012, a staggering 68% of them had records for illegal discharge while 25% had never met national environmental standards, according to official data from China's state Ocean Administration.

The use of hazardous chemicals during the manufacture of children's clothing poses a large-scale problem in China and around the world. Not only is it leading to environmental pollution locally, as seen from the discharges in Wubao, residues of these substances can also be found amongst the millions of products, sold and exported across China and to countries all over the planet from textile towns such as Shishi and Zhili. For example, 70 – 80% of products produced in Shishi are exported to countries in the Middle East, Europe, North America, Southeast Asia and Africa.

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Climate change puts 40% more people at risk of absolute water scarcity, study says ("why waste water?")

Climate change puts 40% more people at risk of absolute water scarcity, study says ("why waste water?") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Water scarcity impacts people's lives in many countries already today. Future population growth will increase the demand for freshwater even further.

Yet in addition to this, on the supply side, water resources will be affected by projected changes in rainfall and evaporation. Climate change due to unabated greenhouse-gas emissions within our century is likely to put 40 percent more people at risk of absolute water scarcity than would be without climate change, a new study shows.

"The steepest increase of global water scarcity might happen between 2 and 3 degrees global warming above pre-industrial levels, and this is something to be experienced within the next few decades unless emissions get cut soon," says lead-author Jacob Schewe of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. "It is well-known that water scarcity increases, but our study is the first to quantify the relative share that climate change has in that, compared to -- and adding to -- the increase that is simply due to population growth."

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Shrimp Fishing Banned in Gulf of Maine Due to Ocean Warming | EcoWatch ("a dire taste of the worse")

Shrimp Fishing Banned in Gulf of Maine Due to Ocean Warming | EcoWatch ("a dire taste of the worse") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it

Warming ocean waters in New England have caused shrimp populations to fall so low that shrimp fishing in the Gulf of Maine has been banned for the 2014 season.

The situation is so dire that it’s possible the ban could be extended for more than a year. The Section considers the stock to have completely collapsed with little prospect of recovery in thenear future.

Many fish in the Gulf of Maine are not surviving long enough to mature—a process called recruitment—due to increasing water temperatures and a decline in phytoplankton, which comprises the shrimp’s diet, the Section said.

“Given the overwhelming evidence of recruitment failure and stock collapse and continuing unfavorable environmental conditions, the Section felt it was necessary to close the 2014 fishery to protect the remaining spawning biomass and allow as much hatch to take place as possible,” Terry Stockwell, the Northern Shrimp Section chairman, said.


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Mapped: The World’s Water Crisis ("Phil belongs to the high stressed areas that need attention")

Mapped: The World’s Water Crisis ("Phil belongs to the high stressed areas that need attention") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The Aqueduct Project of the World Resources Institute has released the first ever index ranking countries by “water stress”—the ratio of water being withdrawn to available supply.

The world’s most water-stressed countries are an eclectic group including both desert countries like Saudi Arabia and tropical islands like Saint Lucia and Jamaica; wealthy countries like Singapore and poor ones like Yemen.

As I mentioned Tuesday, Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian Authority recently signed a deal that will involve in the construction of a desalination plant in Southern Jordan to provide billions of gallons a year to all three places. All three are among the most water-stressed countries on Earth.  

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Water Scarcity Drives U.S. Communities Toward Smarter Use, Recycling ("how much is it when its gone?")

Water Scarcity Drives U.S. Communities Toward Smarter Use, Recycling ("how much is it when its gone?") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Bloomberg BNA — Virtually all of the water flushed down toilets and sent down drains in U.S. homes and businesses goes to wastewater treatment plants where it is cleaned up and then discharged into rivers, lakes, streams and oceans.

A conservation push spurred in part by drought, and expectations of greater shortages in the future, could change that. Soon, consumers could be irrigating their lawns or washing their cars with water that has come directly from a wastewater treatment plant.

Some might even be drinking it, experts tell Bloomberg BNA.

“We need to view stormwater as tomorrow's drinking water—or wastewater as tomorrow's drinking water,” said Benjamin Grumbles, president of U.S. Water Alliance, which promotes the concept of “one water” rather than the traditional approach of treating and regulating wastewater and drinking water separately.

In many areas, especially in the arid Southwest, reclaimed water is already being used to water golf courses or to fill fountains. But with predictions of increasingly dry periods, a result of climate change, and a growing demand for water, the use of reclaimed wastewater in more applications is expected to grow.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Water reuse level raised by drought.

“Expanding water reuse—the use of treated wastewater for beneficial purposes including irrigation, industrial uses, and drinking water augmentation—could significantly increase the nation's total available water resources,”

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5 solutions to the world's energy, food and water troubles ("get out of the box & think as a whole")

5 solutions to the world's energy, food and water troubles ("get out of the box & think as a whole") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
On World Water Day, breathtaking challenges for sustaining the future come into focus. The good news? Real solutions exist.

Real solutions to real problems

A holistic outlook that integrates behavior, technology, and conservation is what’s needed to help set the world on a sustainable path. Greater efficiencies through an integrated approach to our energy and water constraints mean that we are protecting our resources and help to establish financial stability in these sectors.

So, while the energy-water nexus seems daunting, there are solutions to help mitigate or solve these challenges:

1. Joint planning

With cooperation, energy and water sectors successfully can reduce the reliance on thirsty fossil-fuel electricity and bolster the supply of water. Better understanding of each other’s sectors will enhance coordination and better investment in long-term solutions to preserve our resources.

2. Public education

Education about the energy-water nexus (saving water saves energy and vice versa) is needed, and people need to know that their individual choices do play an important role in solving this issue — choices in which foods they buy, which cars they drive, and more.

3. Low-water energy resources

Support the development of solar and wind energy, which consume little to no water and generate negligible carbon emissions.

4. Preservation

Recognize that our planet’s diverse ecosystems are part of the equation. Thoughtful management of the trade-offs between the needs of the energy and water sectors, and the plants and animals we share this planet with, is critical if we are going to ensure that short-term gains for economic development do not undermine the ecosystem that’s so important for future resilience and sustainability.

5. Fair value pricing

Appropriately price energy and water resources to both provide sufficient revenues for industry players and promote conservation and efficiency through price signals.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The UN is interested in the energy-water nexus for the same reason that the World Bank is interested in it: the inequality of access to basic services, such as safe-drinking water and electricity, is unacceptable and indicative of extreme poverty across the globe. By coordinating policies and programs between the two sectors, energy and water can innovate together and improve people’s lives across the globe. Through this attention, it is hoped that these two sectors will enhance energy security and sustainable water use.

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It's World Water Day: 5 shocking facts about water scarcity that will make you cry a river

It's World Water Day: 5 shocking facts about water scarcity that will make you cry a river | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
If you're reading this, you probably have clean water that runs out of your tap with the twist of a handle. But for almost 800 million people, it's not nearly so simple, and water scarcity is a very real, and very deadly, reality for them.

To help raise awareness of these very real water issues on World Water Day 2014 (March 22nd), here are five shocking facts about water scarcity.

1. Almost 800 million people lack access to clean safe water every day.

2. Almost 3 ½ million people die every year because of water and sanitation and hygiene-related causes, and almost all of them (99%) are in the developing world. 

3. Every 21 seconds, another child dies from a water-related illness. Diarrhea, something we don't really consider to be dangerous in the developed world, is actually incredibly deadly, and is the second leading global cause of death for kids under five.

4. More than 1 billion people still practice open defecation every day. In fact, more people have a mobile phone than a toilet.

5. The average American, taking a 5 minute shower, uses more water than an average person in the slums of a developing country does in a whole day. 

Bert Guevara's insight:

"Water poverty and its related issues affect the health, wealth, education, and wellbeing of all of those who live with it every day, so supporting clean water initiatives can make a big difference for many of our fellow Earthlings."

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Number of days without rain to dramatically increase in some world regions ("where's the water going?")

Number of days without rain to dramatically increase in some world regions ("where's the water going?") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
By the end of the 21st century, some parts of the world can expect as many as 30 more days a year without precipitation, according to a new study. Ongoing climate change caused by human influences will alter the nature of how rain and snow falls; areas that are prone to dry conditions will receive their precipitation in narrower windows of time. Computer model projections of future conditions indicate that regions such as the Amazon, Central America, Indonesia, and all Mediterranean climate regions around the world will likely see the greatest increase in the number of "dry days" per year, going without rain for as many as 30 days more every year. California, with its Mediterranean climate, is likely to have five to ten more dry days per year.

"Changes in intensity of precipitation events and duration of intervals between those events will have direct effects on vegetation and soil moisture," said Stephen Jackson, director of the U.S. Department of the Interior Southwest Climate Science Center, which co-funded the study. "(Study lead author Suraj) Polade and colleagues provide analyses that will be of considerable value to natural resource managers in climate adaptation and planning. Their study represents an important milestone in improving ecological and hydrological forecasting under climate change."

Polade, a postdoctoral researcher at Scripps, said that one of the implications of this finding is that annual rainfall could become less reliable in drying regions as annual averages will be calculated over a smaller number of days. The 28 models used by the team showed agreement in many parts of the world on the change in the number of dry days those regions will receive. They were in less agreement about how intense rain or snow will be when it does fall, although there is general consensus among models that the most extreme precipitation will become more frequent. Climate models agreed even less on how the conflicting daily changes affect annual mean rainfall.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Because of changing climate patterns, distribution of rainfall is affected. Some dry regions will become dryer. Other rainy regions will get drenched with more rain.

In the Philippines, we expect the same to happen. Typhoons accompanied by flooding in one extreme; long dry spells at the other end. 2014 is an example of this extreme weather pattern, according to predictions.

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It Takes A Village To Reverse Global Warming ("geo-engineering anyone? most good ideas begin as weird")

One man enlists the help of a village to try to reverse the climate of the entire planet. Is this a good thing? Playlists are working differ...

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

There are many "unverified" geo-engineering ideas, proposals and concepts floating around which may help in climate change mitigation. Some are good; some are hoaxes.

We just need to filter the good from the worthless. This is how all good ideas began.

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 9, 11:24 PM

There are many "unverified" geo-engineering ideas, proposals and concepts floating around which may help in climate change mitigation. Some are good; some are hoaxes.

We just need to filter the good from the worthless. This is how all good ideas began.

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Scientists discover 95% of all fish in the ocean haven't been touched by fishermen - Geek ("gotcha!!!")

Scientists discover 95% of all fish in the ocean haven't been touched by fishermen - Geek ("gotcha!!!") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
Scientists discover 95% of all fish in the ocean haven't been touched by fishermen
Geek
Fish species that call the mesopelagic zone home usually come closer to the surface at night to feed.

Fish species that call the mesopelagic zone home usually come closer to the surface at night to feed. By diving back down at dawn, they avoid predators like birds (and people). Living at these depths has resulted in the evolution of larger eyes and more sensitivity to changes in pressure. As a result, these creatures are quite adept at dodging nets. They can spot them as far out as five meters — long enough to avoid even the widest nets.

The team making these new counts of fish populations used sonar-based tools as a stand-in for traditional nets. They found 10-30 times more fish in the mesopelagic zone than expected. If these numbers hold up to scrutiny, that would mean 95% of the world’s fish biomass lives in the mesopelagic zone where they have been virtually untouched by fishermen. That would mean the oceans are much healthier than previously thought. We might even have a path toward sustainable fishing if our estimates of fish populations were off by that much.

Bert Guevara's insight:

So that is where all the fishes have gone!!!

"If these numbers hold up to scrutiny, that would mean 95% of the world’s fish biomass lives in the mesopelagic zone where they have been virtually untouched by fishermen. That would mean the oceans are much healthier than previously thought. We might even have a path toward sustainable fishing if our estimates of fish populations were off by that much."

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Big Antarctic glacier to keep raising seas, even without warming ("but there is warming & melting")

Big Antarctic glacier to keep raising seas, even without warming ("but there is warming & melting") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
* Pine Island glacier shrank 8,000 years ago, lasted decades* New melt similar, will add to sea level rise-Science studyBy Alister Doyle, Environment CorrespondentOSLO, Feb 20 (Reuters) - A thawing

A thawing Antarctic glacier that is the biggest contributor to rising sea levels is likely to continue shrinking for decades, even without an extra spur from global warming, a study showed on Thursday.

Scientists said the Pine Island Glacier, which carries more water to the sea than the Rhine River, also thinned 8,000 years ago at rates comparable to the present, in a melt that lasted for decades, perhaps for centuries.

A creeping rise in sea levels is a threat to low-lying coasts from Bangladesh to Florida, and to cities from London to Shanghai. Of the world's biggest glaciers, in Antarctica and Greenland, Pine Island is the largest contributor.

The trigger of the ancient thinning, of about a metre (3 ft) a year, was probably a natural climate shift that warmed the sea and melted the floating end of the glacier, removing a buttress that let ice on land slide more quickly into the sea.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Bad news for coastal areas. With or without warming, sea level rise continues.

"The amount of ice being lost from Pine Island glacier is equivalent to every person on our planet pouring 10 pints (5.7 litres) of water into the ocean every day," Professor Andrew Shepherd, an expert at the University of Leeds who was not involved in the study, told Reuters. "That's the last thing our flood defences need right now."

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How business can take action on the California water crisis ("the ugly side of CC - drought!")

How business can take action on the California water crisis ("the ugly side of CC - drought!") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The Golden State has developed an action plan to address water scarcity. Here’s how businesses can help.

The state's drought is exposing the importance of water in agriculture, energy production, manufacturing, residential use, ecosystems and more. It is also beginning to highlight what needs to change with regards to how we value water and the importance of water stewardship.

A recent Reuters article summarizes the extent of the drought and the particular impact to the agricultural sector in California —  the nation's No.1 agricultural producer, responsible for half of the nation's fruits and vegetables. Some 500,000 acres of cropland are expected to be left idle in 2014 due to reductions in available water. The impact could be in the billions of dollars to the state economy.

To help address the problem, the Golden State released the California Water Action Plan (PDF) in January. As California's official vision, it recommends how to address water scarcity, with goals for management over the next five years. On a broad level, the plan describes the following 10 major goals:

1. Make conservation a California way of life.

2. Increase regional self-reliance and integrated water management across all levels of government.

3. Achieve the Delta Reform Act's "co-equal goals" of reliable water supply and improved environmental quality for the Delta.

4. Protect and restore important ecosystems.

5. Manage and prepare for dry periods.

6. Expand water storage capacity and improve groundwater management.

7. Provide safe water for all communities.

8. Increase flood protection.

9. Increase operational and regulatory efficiency.

10. Identify sustainable and integrated financing opportunities.

Bert Guevara's insight:

California drought is included in the many climate change impacts in many climate studies. It is high time to rewrite the manuals and textbooks on agriculture because drought is the "new normal" in these regions.

Here are some of the suggestions which the Philippines can learn from. El Niño for the Pacific region is not far away.

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BREAKING: Another, Completely Separate Spill in West Virginia Is Contaminating The Water

BREAKING: Another, Completely Separate Spill in West Virginia Is Contaminating The Water | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
This spill occurs about a month after a chemical spill polluted the water for 300,000 West Virginians.
Workers have shut down the slurry pumps to stop the spill, but the slurry has contaminated the creek, which flows into the Kanawha River. Responders are trying to contain the spill to Fields Creek in the hopes that it does not reach the Kanawha River. Officials say if the spill does reach the river they don’t think it will affect drinking water because there are no water intakes downstream of the spill. Coal slurry is a mix of solid and liquid waste that’s created from coal preparation, a process that includes washing coal with chemicals like MCHM. The DEP said in a statement that the facility utilizes a frothing chemical called Flomin 110-C that contains MCHM, the same chemical that spilled from a Freedom Industries holding plant and contaminated water for 300,000 West Virginians last month. Lawmakers have been grappling with how to prevent similar spills from happening in the future — West Virginia Sen. John Unger (D), introduced a bill aimed at regulating above-ground storage tanks that was passed unanimously in the Senate, but Tuesday morning’s spill proves that other holding facilities, including impoundments, are also at risk of spills.
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Dead Sea Creatures Cover 98% of Ocean Floor After Fukushima ("the world need to know the truth")

Dead Sea Creatures Cover 98% of Ocean Floor After Fukushima ("the world need to know the truth") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Dead sea life covers about 1 percent of the ocean floor off the CA coast. Now, it seems to be covering about 98 percent after Fukushima.

Throughout the study and the National Geographic coverage of it, climate change is blamed. Never mind the fact that the astronomical increase in sea snot occurred in conjunction with the Fukushima nuclear disaster—they don’t even bother to mention that.

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred when an earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit the area on March 11, 2011. To this day, the amount of damage is unclear as the Japanese government along with TEPCO (the power company that owns the nuclear power plant) seem to be content to hide the truth.

Measurements taken in March 2012 show sea snot levels to be at about 1%. Just a few months later, they had grown to 98%.

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9 Things You Should Know About Farmed Fish - Mercola ("too much of anything leads to abuse & effects")

9 Things You Should Know About Farmed Fish - Mercola ("too much of anything leads to abuse & effects") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Fish farming may seem like a good idea, but there are many controversies and health risks surrounding this industry.

1. The Omega-3 Levels are Not What You Think

2. Small Prey Fish May be Driven to Extinction

3. Fish Feel Pain and Stress

4. Farmed Fish May Spread Disease to Wild Fish

5. Fish Farms Pollute the Environment and Damage Local Ecosystems

6. Fish Feces Harm Coral Reefs

7. Farmed Fish Escape

8. The Jevons Paradox in Practice

9. Revenues Can’t Offset the Heavy Environmental Costs

 

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Sea level rise since Industrial Revolution greater than in the past - UPI.com

Sea level rise since Industrial Revolution greater than in the past - UPI.com | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Sea level rise since Industrial Revolution greater than in the past UPI.com The scientists used geological evidence of the past few million years to derive a background pattern of natural sea-level rise, then compared that with historical...

At current rates heights may reach 30 inches above the modern level by 2100 and 8 feet by 2200, researchers from the University of Southampton and the Australian National University reported Thursday.

The scientists used geological evidence of the past few million years to derive a background pattern of natural sea-level rise, then compared that with historical tide-gauge and satellite observations of sea-level change for the "global warming" period since the industrial revolution.

"Historical observations show a rising sea level from about 1800 as sea water warmed up and melt water from glaciers and ice fields flowed into the oceans," said Gavin Foster of Southampton's National Oceanographic Center. "Around 2000, sea level was rising by about three mm per year. That may sound slow, but it produces a significant change over time."

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