Water Stewardship
8.9K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Bert Guevara
onto Water Stewardship
Scoop.it!

Holding back the sea - Washington Post; "an expensive delayed reaction after the denial stage collapsed"

Holding back the sea - Washington Post; "an expensive delayed reaction after the denial stage collapsed" | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Holding back the seaWashington PostON MONDAY, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said that the response to Hurricane Sandy will cost $42 billion. On Wednesday, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) claimed that his state needs nearly as much.

On the same day, a group of climate researchers released calculations that indicate the world’s oceans are rising 60 percent faster than the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change anticipated five years ago. Projecting how Greenland’s ice will behave in a warming world or what will happen to the polar ice caps decades from now is difficult. But sea levels appear to be on track to rise by several feet over the next century, with every inch putting more Americans at risk. Sea-level researchers Robert Kopp and Benjamin Strauss estimate that a five-foot rise would produce Sandy-like floods in New York every 15 years, on average.

more...
No comment yet.
Latest news on the state of the Earth's water resources.
Curated by Bert Guevara
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Alaska Native village votes to relocate in the face of rising sea levels ("threat is real for them")

Alaska Native village votes to relocate in the face of rising sea levels ("threat is real for them") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

The villagers were nearly split on whether to leave their ancestral home for good.

Today, the coastal village of Shishmaref, Alaska, voted to relocate due to climate change–induced rising sea levels, according to city council secretary Donna Burr. The community is home to about 600 people, most of whom are Inupiat Inuit, and welcomed votes from tribal and non-tribal residents alike. 

This isn’t the first time the village has voted to relocate. In 2002, residents chose to leave for the mainland, but a lack of federal funds made that impossible. The U.S. Department of the Interior has made $8 million available for all tribes seeking relocation — that’s far short of the estimated $200 million the village needs to move.  

A lot of residents, like 25-year-old Tiffany Magby, are too young to really remember the 2002 vote. Magby says she’s heard talk of relocation almost her entire life and that the vote was difficult for her. 

“I waited until the last hour to vote,” Magby says. “I have a 3-year-old son, and am worried about what it means for his upbringing.” 

Magby voted to stay, because she doesn’t want her son to lose access to traditional values outside of Shishmaref. She says she didn’t know how most people voted, because most were quiet about the decision, pondering their vote until the last minute. The vote still needs to be certified, but the unofficial ballot results are 89-to-78, according to Burr. 

Burr says that that due to a lack of state and federal funding, the village will have to figure out a creative process to relocate. “It’s not going to happen in our lifetimes,” Burr says. “We just want to take the right steps forward for our children.”

Bert Guevara's insight:
Enough with the speculations and alarmists, sea level rise is so real for this Alaskan village that they have agreed to evacuate and transfer.

"Today, the coastal village of Shishmaref, Alaska, voted to relocate due to climate change–induced rising sea levels, according to city council secretary Donna Burr. The community is home to about 600 people, most of whom are Inupiat Inuit, and welcomed votes from tribal and non-tribal residents alike. 
"This isn’t the first time the village has voted to relocate. In 2002, residents chose to leave for the mainland, but a lack of federal funds made that impossible. The U.S. Department of the Interior has made $8 million available for all tribes seeking relocation — that’s far short of the estimated $200 million the village needs to move."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Seas aren’t just rising, scientists say — it’s worse than that. They’re speeding up. ("too late?")

Seas aren’t just rising, scientists say — it’s worse than that. They’re speeding up. ("too late?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Scientists say that once they correct for the cooling effect of 1991's Mount Pinatubo eruption, sea level rise is accelerating.

On a warming Earth, seas inevitably rise, as ice on land melts and makes its way to the ocean. And not only that — the ocean itself swells, because warm water expands. We already know this is happening — according to NASA, seas are currently rising at a rate of 3.5 millimeters per year, which converts to about 1.4 inches per decade.

However, scientists have long expected that the story should be even worse than this. Predictions suggest that seas should not only rise, but that the rise should accelerate, meaning that the annual rate of rise should itself increase over time. That’s because the great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, should lose more and more mass, and the heat in the ocean should also increase.

The problem, or even mystery, is that scientists haven’t seen an unambiguous acceleration of sea level rise in a data record that’s considered the best for observing the problem — the one that began with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite, which launched in late 1992 and carried an instrument, called a radar altimeter, that gives a very precise measurement of sea level around the globe. (It has since been succeeded by other satellites providing similar measurements.) 

This record actually shows a decrease in the rate of sea level rise from the first decade measured by satellites (1993 to 2002) to the second one (2003 to 2012). “We’ve been looking at the altimeter records and scratching our heads, and saying, ‘why aren’t we seeing an acceleration in the satellite record?’ We should be,” said John Fasullo, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.

The study was performed using a suite of 40 climate change models to determine how the Pinatubo eruption affected seas and the global distribution of water. The scientists estimate as a result that sea level not only fell between 5 and 7 millimeters due to a major ocean cooling event in the eruption’s wake, but then experienced a rebound, or bounce back, of the same magnitude once the influence of the eruption had passed.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Because of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, our scientists' projections were thrown off. But now that Mt. Pinatubo's effect on the environment is waning, the sea level rise is back to its normal speed. This is scary.

"So far, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change officially estimates that the high-end sea-level rise projection for 2100 is lower than some of these scenarios, closer to about 1 meter (3.3 feet) by that year. But that has recently been challenged by new work estimating that Antarctica alone could add this much to global sea levels by 2100 if high levels of human greenhouse gas emissions continue."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Flint’s lead-poisoned water cost the city nearly 100 times as much as it was supposed to save

Flint’s lead-poisoned water cost the city nearly 100 times as much as it was supposed to save | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

The disastrous switch from Lake Huron to the Flint River as the city's water source will cost it nearly $460 million.

The Flint water crisis wasn’t just terrible for the thousands of its residents who were exposed to lead. It’s also been bad for the city’s coffers — really bad. 

According to Peter Muennig from Columbia University’s School of Public Health, switching the water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint river — a move that was intended to save the city $5 million — will actually cost the city nearly $460 million. 

That figure doesn’t just cover emergency water and medical care — it includes social costs, including “lower economic productivity, greater dependence on welfare programs, and greater costs to the criminal justice system,” as James Hamblin points out in The Atlantic. 

Young people are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning, which has serious consequences on developing brains and can result in intellectual disabilities and anti-social behavior. And state officials have advised that all children under six in Flint – an estimated 8,000 to 9,000 kids – should be treated as though they’ve been exposed. Two years after the lead crisis started, the water in Flint is still unsafe to drink without a filter.

Bert Guevara's insight:
"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."
What actually happened -- Flint’s lead-poisoned water cost the city nearly 100 times as much as it was supposed to save.

"According to Peter Muennig from Columbia University’s School of Public Health, switching the water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint river — a move that was intended to save the city $5 million — will actually cost the city nearly $460 million."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Fathom One is a modular underwater drone that explores the deep ("after aerial drones, check this")

Fathom One is a modular underwater drone that explores the deep ("after aerial drones, check this") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Get ready to welcome the Fathom One, the world’s first affordable modular underwater drone.

Costing just $600, small enough to be carried in a rucksack, and controllable via smartphone or tablet, the Fathom will give users the chance to explore underwater locations they otherwise couldn’t — courtesy of a full HD live stream from the deep. 

“In the same way that aerial drones have allowed people to soar to new heights in the past five years, the Fathom One is about allowing people to dive to new depths,” Danny Vessells, one of Fathom One’s co-founders, told Digital Trends. 

Much as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have transformed everything from photography to the delivery of medical supplies, Vessells noted that underwater drones like Fathom offer plenty of innovative use-cases. 

It could, for example, be used to carry out tasks such as inspecting underwater pipes, search-and-rescue operations, research, or even giving fishermen a competitive edge by finding the best spot to drop a line. There are also all the ready consumer applications we’d expect — like snapping a truly unique underwater shot or offering tourists a twenty-first century upgrade on the glass-bottom boat experience to check out marine life. 

According to its creators, the Fathom drone is able to dive to a depth of 100 ft, and has a range of 100 ft from shore station, plus 100 ft tether. The modular aspect of Fathom One is equally exciting. Not only does it make it easier to transport, since you can easily take it apart and put it back together again, but it also offers the tantalizing promise of add-ons. 

Bert Guevara's insight:
This technology opens up a whole range of possibilities, especially for those who cannot go diving. Later developments of this underwater drone will make underwater surveillance cheaper and safer for humans.

"According to its creators, the Fathom drone is able to dive to a depth of 100 ft, and has a range of 100 ft from shore station, plus 100 ft tether. The modular aspect of Fathom One is equally exciting. Not only does it make it easier to transport, since you can easily take it apart and put it back together again, but it also offers the tantalizing promise of add-ons."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Future of world fish production depends on urgent action to combat falling stocks ("it's up to us")

Future of world fish production depends on urgent action to combat falling stocks ("it's up to us") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

UN agency releases global status of fish stocks revealing 89.5% are fully fished or overfished, while OECD forecasts 17% rise in fish production by 2025.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has today released its report on the state of world fisheries and aquaculture. The flagship SOFIA report, considered a check-up on the world’s fish supplies, has confirmed an alarming trend over the years in falling fish stocks, the result of vast overfishing on a global scale. Oceana regrets the new findings, which place overfished and fully-fished stocks at 89.5% in 2016, compared to around 62-68% in 2000. 

“We now have a fifth more of global fish stocks at worrying levels than we did in 2000. The global environmental impact of overfishing is incalculable and the knock-on impact for coastal economies is simply too great for this to be swept under the rug any more”, said Lasse Gustavsson, Executive Director of Oceana in Europe. 

In a parallel report published earlier this week on agriculture and fisheries, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) forecasts a growth in fish production of up to 17% by 2025. However, due to declining fish stocks, only 1% will come from fisheries, with aquaculture becoming the driving force behind this growth. 

Oceana believes that aquaculture is not the solution to meeting an increasing global demand - we must first address the unsustainable exploitation of wild fish. In fact, the OECD stressed that the rise in fish production hangs in the balance of environmental factors and productivity in fish stocks.

Bert Guevara's insight:
There is something wrong in the culture and values of our present fishermen. They fish as if there is no tomorrow.

“The figures speak for themselves. Overfishing will knock wild, everyday fish from our dining tables replacing it with aquaculture and other seafood. Only through sustainable fisheries management and by ending overfishing will we really able to increase fish in our oceans and ensure seafood can be put on a plate for millions of people”, concluded Gustavsson.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Sections of Great Barrier Reef suffering from 'complete ecosystem collapse' ("no more fish thriving")

Sections of Great Barrier Reef suffering from 'complete ecosystem collapse' ("no more fish thriving") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Coral Watch investigator reports ‘shocking’ lack of fish and says the surviving corals are continuing to bleach, even during winter

“The lack of fish was the most shocking thing,” said Justin Marshall, of the University of Queensland and the chief investigator of citizen science program Coral Watch. “In broad terms, I was seeing a lot less than 50% of what was there [before the bleaching]. Some species I wasn’t seeing at all.” Marshall spent a week this month conducting surveys on the reefs around Lizard Island.

Marshall said many of the fish species that were commonly seen around branching coral had completely disappeared from the area, including the black-and-white striped humbug damselfish. He said in his time there he saw only one school of green chromis, which were previously seen all over the area. 

Marshall said the lack of fish was an indication that there was “complete ecosystem collapse”. Without enough surviving corals, the fish didn’t have the shelter and food sources they needed and had died or moved elsewhere. 

Without many of those fish, Marshall said the coral would face a harder time recovering, since the entire ecosystem had been degraded.

He said he was also surprised to see that some of the surviving corals continued to bleach, despite the southern hemisphere winter bringing cooler waters to the Great Barrier Reef.

Bert Guevara's insight:
It used to be unthinkable that the Great Barrier Reef, a very rich expanse of ocean-life biodiversity, is now collapsing in many areas. Does this confirm accelerated extinction?

"Marshall said the lack of fish was an indication that there was “complete ecosystem collapse”. Without enough surviving corals, the fish didn’t have the shelter and food sources they needed and had died or moved elsewhere. ...
"He said he was also surprised to see that some of the surviving corals continued to bleach, despite the southern hemisphere winter bringing cooler waters to the Great Barrier Reef."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Warming Could Mean More Algae Blooms Like Florida’s ("it's payback time for pollution + warming")

Warming Could Mean More Algae Blooms Like Florida’s ("it's payback time for pollution + warming") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Algae blooms like the one plaguing Lake Okeechobee and Florida's coastline could happen more often as lakes and coastal waters warm.

The algae bloom is the result of a combination of factors, including the abundant nutrients washed in from surrounding agricultural lands, heavy winter rains and hot, calm summer weather. In the future, such blooms could become more common as Earth’s rising temperature heats up lakes and oceans, providing a more favorable home for algae and other potentially toxic microorganisms in the water.

The Okeechobee bloom began in May, when it was only about 33 square miles in area. Nutrients that the algae need to flourish are plentiful in the lake, primarily coming from fertilizers used in agricultural land. But those nutrients are not enough on their own to fuel a bloom; normally the lake is too turbid, with sediment in the water blocking the light that the algae need to drive photosynthesis. 

But in May, calm weather led to stiller water that let light through its upper layers, allowing the algae (a type called Microcystis) to go wild. 

“All it takes is the right weather,” Karl Havens, director of the Florida Sea Grant, said. Havens hasn’t studied this particular bloom, but said it bore a strong resemblance to what happened during the last major such bloom in 2005.

Added to that recipe were very heavy winter rains (due largely to a strong El Niño) that led to high water levels in the lake, taxing an old, ailing dike. To ease the pressure on the dike, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released water from the lake, which took the algae down the St. Lucie River and out to coastal waters, along with enough freshwater for them to thrive in the normally saline estuary.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Enjoy swimming while the water is still fine. The attack of the ALGAE BLOOM will be coming to a beach or lake near you.

"Warmer water temperatures could provide a more favorable environment for algae to grow and affect where they occur, how quickly they grow and how toxic they are. The 2015 study found that such blooms should be expected to increase by 20 percent in lakes.
"Algae, of course, aren’t the only potentially harmful microorganisms lurking in the water that could benefit from warmer temperatures. 
“When you go to the beach, there’s always some amount of viruses, protozoa and bacteria,” Havens said, and many of them thrive in warmer temperatures.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Filipinos consumer almost twice more than their daily water needs ("maybe its due to the weather")

Filipinos consumer almost twice more than their daily water needs ("maybe its due to the weather") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Empty description
Bert Guevara's insight:
Let us use water wisely and help the Philippines be secure in water resources.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

New Microscope Shows Coral Colonies Kissing, Fighting & Eating ("they're not plants; they're animals")

Scientists use a new underwater microscope to observe coral in its natural habitat for the first time.

Although corals look like a plant, they are actually animals, made up of thousands of individual polyps living together in a colony. Because of their small size, scientific observation of them has been difficult, if not impossible outside of a lab. 

Now, Andrew Mullen and Tali Treibitz from the University of California San Diego have developed a new way to observe coral colonies in their natural habitat. The Benthic Underwater Microscope (BUM) allows divers to capture photos of corals over time without removing samples to be studied in a lab, as they demonstrated in a paper published in Nature on July 12th.  They used the BUM in the Gulf of Eilat at the northern tip of the Red Sea to observe corals feeding, fighting, sharing, and even ‘kissing’, a previously unobserved behavior. 

As coral bleaching threatens the world’s reefs, they hope that the instrument will be an important tool in understanding how corals work in the complex and constantly changing environment of the sea floor.


Bert Guevara's insight:
Great mistake - corals are not plants, they are actually animals! Check out the amazing microscopic shots of how they kiss, fight and eat.

"Although corals look like a plant, they are actually animals, made up of thousands of individual polyps living together in a colony. ...
"As coral bleaching threatens the world’s reefs, they hope that the instrument will be an important tool in understanding how corals work in the complex and constantly changing environment of the sea floor."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Future of world fish production depends on urgent action to combat falling fish stocks

Future of world fish production depends on urgent action to combat falling fish stocks | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

UN agency releases global status of fish stocks revealing 89.5% are fully fished or overfished, while OECD forecasts 17% rise in fish production by 2025.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has today released its report on the state of world fisheries and aquaculture. The flagship SOFIA report, considered a check-up on the world’s fish supplies, has confirmed an alarming trend over the years in falling fish stocks, the result of vast overfishing on a global scale. Oceana regrets the new findings, which place overfished and fully-fished stocks at 89.5% in 2016, compared to around 62-68% in 2000. 

“We now have a fifth more of global fish stocks at worrying levels than we did in 2000. The global environmental impact of overfishing is incalculable and the knock-on impact for coastal economies is simply too great for this to be swept under the rug any more”, said Lasse Gustavsson, Executive Director of Oceana in Europe. 

In a parallel report published earlier this week on agriculture and fisheries, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) forecasts a growth in fish production of up to 17% by 2025. However, due to declining fish stocks, only 1% will come from fisheries, with aquaculture becoming the driving force behind this growth. 

Oceana believes that aquaculture is not the solution to meeting an increasing global demand - we must first address the unsustainable exploitation of wild fish. In fact, the OECD stressed that the rise in fish production hangs in the balance of environmental factors and productivity in fish stocks.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The fear of overfishing is now more real than 15 years ago. Most of our fish are now coming from aquaculture.

“We now have a fifth more of global fish stocks at worrying levels than we did in 2000. The global environmental impact of overfishing is incalculable and the knock-on impact for coastal economies is simply too great for this to be swept under the rug any more”, said Lasse Gustavsson, Executive Director of Oceana in Europe.
In a parallel report published earlier this week on agriculture and fisheries, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) forecasts a growth in fish production of up to 17% by 2025. However, due to declining fish stocks, only 1% will come from fisheries, with aquaculture becoming the driving force behind this growth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Dangerous super bacteria found in Rio waters before Summer Olympics ("sewer dumping to ocean blamed")

Dangerous super bacteria found in Rio waters before Summer Olympics ("sewer dumping to ocean blamed") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Two disturbing new studies have found that the waters surrounding Rio are teaming with potentially deadly antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Two new academic studies shared with Reuters news show that scientists have found drug-resistant “super bacteria” off Rio de Janeiro beaches – some of which will be hosting Olympic events in August. These deadly microbes, normally only found in hospital settings, have been turning up in the waters near some of the city’s most popular tourist destinations. Though city officials are blaming illegal dumping for the contamination, it more likely has something to do with the fact that Rio pumps literal tons of raw sewage into the ocean with only minimal treatment for safety.

Though Brazil promised to clean the city’s waterways as part of its initial Olympic bid in 2009, that goal has yet to materialize. If anything, the city’s waste-filled waters have only become worse in the intervening years. Athletes have long complained of a sewage stench in the areas where they’re meant to compete, and the amount of debris floating along the shore could pose a potential hazard to swimmers.

The super bacteria were first detected in a 2014 study off Guanabara Bay, where the sailing and wind-surfing competitions are supposed to be held. Last September, new studies showed that the contamination had spread to five other beaches in Rio, including the Copacabana where the open-water and triathlon swimming competitions are supposed to occur. 

These bacteria can cause difficult to treat urinary, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and bloodstream infections and they have been linked to meningitis. According to the CDC, up to 50% the patients with a bloodstream infection from these microbes die. While not everyone exposed will develop an illness, scientists are concerned that the bacteria could lay dormant in a healthy person until they become sick or have a weakened immune system, at which point doctors may be unable to do anything to help. Perhaps the most terrifying thing about these bacteria is the fact that they’re able to pass on their antibiotic resistance to other germs present in the water.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Kadiri Olympics!!!

"These deadly microbes, normally only found in hospital settings, have been turning up in the waters near some of the city’s most popular tourist destinations. Though city officials are blaming illegal dumping for the contamination, it more likely has something to do with the fact that Rio pumps literal tons of raw sewage into the ocean with only minimal treatment for safety.
"Perhaps the most terrifying thing about these bacteria is the fact that they’re able to pass on their antibiotic resistance to other germs present in the water."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

UN: Global fish consumption per capita hits record high - BBC News ("more efficient consumption")

UN: Global fish consumption per capita hits record high - BBC News ("more efficient consumption") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Global per capita fish consumption passes the 20kg per year mark for the first time, but natural marine resources continue to be overfished, UN data shows.

Global per capita fish consumption has hit a record high, passing the 20kg per year mark for the first time, United Nations data has shown. 

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report said it was the result of improved aquaculture and reduced waste. 

It added that people, for the first time on record, were now consuming more farmed fish than wild-caught fish. 

However, the report's authors warn that marine natural resources continue to be overharvested at unsustainable levels. 

The data has been published in the FAO's biennial State of the World's Fisheries and Aquaculture (Sofia) report. 

Manuel Barange, director of FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Resources, welcomed the fact that global per capita fish consumption has passed the 20kg per year threshold. 

"I personally think this is a very good thing because it shows that over the past five decades, fisheries supply - which combines aquaculture, inland fisheries and marine fisheries - has outpaced human population growth very significantly," he said. 

"This is very significant because fisheries have a very much smaller footprint than other main sources of animal protein," he told BBC News. 

"Fish is six times more efficient at converting feed than cattle, and four times more efficient than pork. Therefore increasing the consumption of fish is good for food security. 

Bert Guevara's insight:
Are you eating more seafood this year? 
Then you are a part of the global population that has learned to eat more seafood. Then let us maintain our oceans and seafood sources. Take care of our biodiversity and stop polluting our waters.

"In the 1960s, we used to eat about 67% of the fish we caught and cultured. Currently, it is about 87%," he said. 
"Improving consumption, improving the value chain and reducing losses, combined with aquaculture growth, is what has allowed us to reach this milestone."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Newsroom ("good news for sharks; no action on blue fin tuna")

Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Newsroom ("good news for sharks; no action on blue fin tuna") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

- Atlas - European Commission

Members could not agree on the recommendations by scientific experts to extend the fishing closure for Bigeye and Yellow-fin tuna to a total of 82 days in order to ensure sustainable fisheries in the region while accommodating for the recent increase in fleet capacity. Discussions will resume at an extraordinary meeting to be held in October. The EU is committed to adopting conservation measures in line with scientific advice. No progress was made on the conservation of Bluefin Tuna, a stock which is close to collapse. Decisions were deferred to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission. 

Good results, on the other hand, were achieved for sharks. The conservation measures adopted for silky sharks are not as strong as the EU would have liked, but are definitely a step in the right direction and will hopefully loosens some of the pressure on this vulnerable species. The new measures adopted for stock assessment and data collection on both silky and hammerhead sharks, with safe release procedures for all non-retained sharks and a general ban on shark lines, are equally encouraging. 

The EU proposal on Fishing Aggregating Devices (FADs) was adopted and it will allow for progress on collection of data, research and management of FADs. 

While no decision was taken on the reduction of fleet capacity, general principles were agreed on and the EU entrusted with developing concrete proposals against overcapacity to be presented at the October meeting. 

Regrettably, the IATTC could not reach a consensus on the EU's proposals on fins naturally attached and on port state measures. The EU strongly encourages action in these areas as a way to combat non-sustainable fishing practices and contribute to the protection of vulnerable shark stocks. 

Members re-elected the current Director, who is to modernise the organisation's working methods and resource management on the basis of the recommendations issued by a recent Performance Review.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The predicted collapse of the blue fin tuna specie did not lead to any strong action for conservation. 
Poor tuna, a victim of greed.

"... No progress was made on the conservation of Bluefin Tuna, a stock which is close to collapse. Decisions were deferred to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission. 
"Good results, on the other hand, were achieved for sharks. The conservation measures adopted for silky sharks are not as strong as the EU would have liked, but are definitely a step in the right direction and will hopefully loosens some of the pressure on this vulnerable species. The new measures adopted for stock assessment and data collection on both silky and hammerhead sharks, with safe release procedures for all non-retained sharks and a general ban on shark lines, are equally encouraging."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Climate change is doing weird things to our beaches ("scenario is no longer the same due to climate")

Climate change is doing weird things to our beaches ("scenario is no longer the same due to climate") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Climate change is expected to make beaches get saltier, leading to potentially significant changes for crabs, sea birds and other coastal creatures, according to a new study. 

Researchers had expected the subsurface or ‘pore’ water in beaches to be about as salty as the waves washing over it. 

However, they discovered that at the high tide mark on a beach in Delaware Bay, average salinity was more than twice the seawater and up to four times higher in places.

It is thought that evaporation is the main reason behind the increased concentration and suggested this could intensify due to climate change.

In the journal Scientific Reports, they said: “An increase in temperature or a decrease in relative humidity – for example, due to climate change – would not only increase the pore-water salinity in the beach, but would also alter its spatial distribution; abrupt salinity increases are expected to occur immediately near the water line.” 

The scientists, from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), tested 400 different samples at different times of the day and night on seven days.

They found the seawater had salt concentrations of 25 grams per litre (g/L), compared to an average of 60 g/L at the high tide mark, with some places as high as 100 g/L. 

Dr Xiaolong Geng, a postdoctoral fellow at NJIT and the principal author of the paper, said: “These elevated levels can only be caused by evaporation, as there is no other mechanism for increasing the salt in pore water – the water trapped between the grains of sediment.

Bert Guevara's insight:
“Based on what we learned, we think this finding should alter the way water management in coastal areas is conducted.”

“Evaporation is an important driver of underground water flow and salinity gradients, and animals such as mussels and crabs are affected by changes in salinity. If the concentrations are too high or too low, they will move away.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

From Boom to Glug glug: Indonesia’s new anti-poacher policy ("turning villains to agents of nature")

From Boom to Glug glug: Indonesia’s new anti-poacher policy ("turning villains to agents of nature") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Blowing up illegal foreign fishing boats is out. Turning them into coral reefs is in.

To mark its independence day on August 17, Indonesia’s fisheries ministry will scuttle 34 fishing boats — from Vietnam, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and China — all caught fishing with faulty documents in Indonesian waters. But instead of blowing up boats like last year, this year the boats will be sunk to build fish habitat alongside the anti-poaching action.

The boats will be sunk in Indonesia’s remote and coral-and-fish-rich marine borderlands in yet another signal to Indonesia’s regional neighbors to curb their poaching fishermen. This time the sinking locations carry a symbolic territorial message as well. 

Nine vessels will be totalled off the waters of Northern Maluku, Sulawesi and Morotai — dileneating Indonesia’s northern border with the restive southern Philippines where pirates and militants ply the waters. Seventeen will be destroyed in the waters off Natuna, Tarempa and Batam — Indonesia’s territorial claims in the South China Sea. Three will be submerged beneath the waters of eastern Borneo where southern Filipino terrorists kidnapped the crew of two indonesian coal trampers. Four will be sunk in western Papua.

Putnam thinks the basic principles behind creating reefs from old boats are mostly sound. Coral need hard, large substrates (such as a sunken boat) to grow on. “Small pieces rolling around on the ocean bottom is not good,” she said. Time is also a component, Putnam added, as “coral also needs a layer of bio-film algae.” However, the process needs to be followed up with research and monitoring.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The Phil used to sink rusting vehicles and rubber tires, but these were failures. Will sinking fishing vessels be better in growing corals?

"Putnam thinks the basic principles behind creating reefs from old boats are mostly sound. Coral need hard, large substrates (such as a sunken boat) to grow on. “Small pieces rolling around on the ocean bottom is not good,” she said. Time is also a component, Putnam added, as “coral also needs a layer of bio-film algae.” However, the process needs to be followed up with research and monitoring."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Flint Is About To Run Out Of Bottled Water And Filters — ThinkProgress ("residents may be left alone")

Flint Is About To Run Out Of Bottled Water And Filters — ThinkProgress ("residents may be left alone") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

As the federal state of emergency lapses, residents may be left in the lurch.

The federal government declared a state of emergency for the city in January after news of the water contamination crisis, in which the city failed to use corrosion control chemicals when it switched water sources and lead leached into its drinking water for years, made national headlines. The state of emergency meant that the government picked up 75 percent of the cost of buying bottled water and filters. 

But that designation lapsed on Sunday. The state will now have to cover the entire cost, which is estimated to come to $3.5 million a month, or $117,400 a day. The state had put aside $6 million for the costs, but that money will soon get eaten up as it shoulders the entire burden.

The water quality in the city has been improving, and officials are urging residents to drink from filtered taps. But the latest citizen-led testing shows that while the city is close to ending the public health disaster, it’s still not safe to drink straight tap water yet. Meanwhile, during the peak of the crisis lead levels were so high that filters couldn’t remove all of the toxic chemical.

Residents will likely have a difficult time buying their own water and filters if help runs out. More than 40 percent of people in Flint live in poverty. Meanwhile, they were already being charged the highest rates for their water services in the country, even while that water was contaminated with lead.

Bert Guevara's insight:
This is the scary scenario when water resources are not protected. What happens when government resources can no longer subsidize bottled water and filters?

"The federal government declared a state of emergency for the city in January after news of the water contamination crisis, in which the city failed to use corrosion control chemicals when it switched water sources and lead leached into its drinking water for years, made national headlines. The state of emergency meant that the government picked up 75 percent of the cost of buying bottled water and filters. 
"But that designation lapsed on Sunday. The state will now have to cover the entire cost, which is estimated to come to $3.5 million a month, or $117,400 a day. The state had put aside $6 million for the costs, but that money will soon get eaten up as it shoulders the entire burden."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

13 ways to provide water & sanitation for nine billion people ("raise the priority level for action")

13 ways to provide water & sanitation for nine billion people ("raise the priority level for action") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

How can water be better managed to ensure enough supply for a growing global population? Our panel of water experts have their say

1. Calculate the water available: We need a better accounting of our “water balance sheet”. In many places, we don’t have any idea how current and near-term future demand matches up with the available surface and groundwater supplies.

2. Link global water use: Although the Swiss are quite efficient at using water within our country, we have a huge water footprint because of all the food and goods we import, often from very water stressed parts of the world. Globalisation means there is a global water economy at play.

3. Think across sectors: Currently, those who work on “water services” think almost exclusively in terms of access, and those who work on “water resources” think in terms of sectors and water usage.

4. Treat water resources better: For a long time we treated water as limitless, and the incentive structures in cities and rural areas pushed people towards unsustainable practices.

5. Develop water monitoring and regulation: Governments can provide both regulatory sideboards – such as requirements for full cost recovery on water tariffs – and incentives – such as cost-share on water reuse and rainwater harvesting systems.

6. Establish accountability mechanisms: To secure a safe water supply for the poorest people, service providers should get into trouble when they fail to provide the services the poorest need.

7. Construct better water points:

8. Invest in simple, efficient irrigation technology:

9. Promote rainwater harvesting:

10. Secure sufficient financing.

11. Work with communities:

12. Invest in staff skills and capacity:

13. Apply smart strategies:

Bert Guevara's insight:
How can water be better managed to ensure enough supply for a growing global population?
Check out these 13 suggestions and decide which ones apply to your area.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Belgian scientists built a solar-powered machine that turns urine into potable water ("pee-drink")

Belgian scientists built a solar-powered machine that turns urine into potable water ("pee-drink") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

A team of truly resourceful scientists at the University of Ghent claim to have created a machine that transforms your urine into drinkable water.

This just may be the ultimate in green technology — if you can stomach it, that is. A team of truly resourceful scientists at the University of Ghent claim to have created a machine that transforms your urine into drinkable water. That’s right. We may soon be drinking our pee. 

It’s all contingent upon solar energy, which means that this technology could be useful in a number of under-resourced areas. To treat the urine, the scientists use the energy of the sun to power membrane distillation, which the team says “holds possible advantages over existing urine treatment technologies.”

In a paper detailing their study, the scientists wrote, “The possibility of potable water production was investigated in human urine by assessing the permeate water quality, maximum recovery and mid-term process stability. It was shown that at least 75 percent of the available water could be recovered from non-hydrolyzed human urine without process failure. As such, membrane distillation is a viable alternative for existing urine treatment.”

Membrane distillation, the Belgian researchers said, is particularly useful because it is particularly energy-efficient. “We’re able to recover fertilizer and drinking water from urine using just a simple process and solar energy,” University of Ghent researcher Sebastiaan Derese told Reuters.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Drink your own pee? What if it tasted like beer? 
This solar-powered urine converter may come in handy sometime.

"To test the viability of the new technology, the team set up their purifying machine at a 10-day festival in Ghent, Belgium, whereupon it collected 1,000 liters of water from attendees’ urine. And what did they do with that water? They turned it into beer. “We call it from sewer to brewer,” Derese said. I mean, they kind of look alike anyway, right? 
"Ultimately, the scientists hope that their urine-purifying machine can be placed in various frequently-visited public spaces, or better still, in developing nations where there remains a dire need for clean drinking water. So if you’re up to #peeforscience, this just may be the best invention of all time."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

6 Human Activities That Pose The Biggest Threat To The World’s Drinking Water ("killing world slowly")

6 Human Activities That Pose The Biggest Threat To The World’s Drinking Water ("killing world slowly") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Humans are doing a pretty good job of seriously messing up our drinking water.

Here are some of the ways that human activity is seriously messing with clean water, both in the United States and around the world. 

Agriculture 

Agriculture is a huge contributor to water pollution, from fertilizers used for row crops to the manure created by large-scale animal agriculture.

Fossil fuel production 

Fossil fuel production is another human activity that places considerable strain on drinking water — and not just because fracking and coal mining use a great deal of water, but because their waste products can pollute groundwater, and therefore drinking water, as well.

Sewage 

In some places, population growth has strained wastewater treatment plants to the point where they cannot handle the amount of sewage that is produced by the city or town.

Pharmaceuticals 

In addition to poop, sewage, fertilizers, and coal ash, the United States’ drinking water might have a drug problem. U.S. health providers — as well as livestock producers — use millions of pounds of pharmaceutical drugs each year, and some of those are ending up in treated drinking water. Antibiotics are a particular concern, because they could lead to antibiotic resistance.

Development 

Development and land-use changes — or the changing of land from rural to urban — is a big part of what the PNAS study published Monday looked at when considering the degradation of drinking water.

Climate change 

The bad news is that climate change is expected to exacerbate a lot of the problems that already threaten our waterways.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Why are we polluting the resource that sustains life? Why are we throwing poisons into our sources of drinking water?

"The study, which was a joint effort from researchers at the Nature Conservancy, Yale University, and Washington State University, looked specifically at how three kinds of water pollution — sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus — have degraded the watersheds from which we obtain our drinking water. These kinds of pollution can enter into watersheds for a variety of reasons, but they all come back to one thing — human activity, which can have seriously detrimental impacts on drinking water."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Giant Clam Poaching Wipes Out Reefs in South China Sea ("if China owned it, why destroy your home?")

Giant Clam Poaching Wipes Out Reefs in South China Sea ("if China owned it, why destroy your home?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

A new analysis of satellite imagery shows extensive coral reef damage in the South China Sea for the first time.

More than 40 square miles (104 square kilometers) of coral reefs—some of the most biodiverse on Earth—have been destroyed by giant clam poaching in the South China Sea, according to a new analysis of satellite imagery. The poachers use boat propellers to loosen the valuable bivalves, which can weigh up to 500 pounds (227 kilograms) and are a luxury item in China. Carving up a reef leaves it barren of life. And because reefs in the region are often interconnected, the damage in one place can have repercussions elsewhere. 

Another 22 square miles (58 square kilometers) of reef have been destroyed by island-building activities, largely by China to solidify its presence, according to the analyis, which was presented at the South China Sea Conference on Tuesday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. Early Tuesday morning, the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague, an international tribunal, issued a long-awaited ruling in favor of the Philippines' claim that China violated its responsibilities under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Seas by engaging in large-scale environmental destruction to build artificial islands. 

John McManus, a marine biologist at the University of Miami who did the analysis, says about 10 percent of the shallow reefs in the Spratly Islands and 8 percent in the Paracels have been damaged by poaching and island building. 

The South China Sea is fiercely contested. China lays claim to almost all of it and has mapped out a boundary that extends hundreds of miles past its southernmost point into marine areas claimed variously by the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Thailand. More than $5.3 trillion worth of international trade passes through these waters annually, making the South China Sea one of the world’s most important shipping routes. For many years the region was believed to contain significant reserves of oil and gas, but the two island chains likely have very little, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration 

Bert Guevara's insight:
If China owned the whole South China Sea, including the Spratly Islands, then why did they destroy the valuable reefs? You do not destroy your house!
It is obvious that they merely wanted to get the riches and run.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Forget seawalls: There’s a cheaper, more effective way to protect shorelines ("use living shorelines")

Forget seawalls: There’s a cheaper, more effective way to protect shorelines ("use living shorelines") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

"Living shorelines" use plants and other natural elements to stabilize vulnerable areas against sea-level rise.

As rising seas begin to creep up our shores, we’re building walls to try to keep the water out. As much as 14 percent of U.S. coasts are already “armored” — that is, built up with hard infrastructure like concrete seawalls. But it’s an imperfect solution. NOAA says that this coastal armor often destroys habitat and causes shorelines to erode even faster. 

A better solution might be “living shorelines,” a design that stabilizes banks with a clever use of wetland plants, sand dunes, stones, and other natural elements (such as oyster reefs, coral reefs, or mangroves, when conditions allow). 

Living shorelines perform the same function as their concrete counterparts — protecting communities and infrastructure from storm damage and flooding — but come with a few perks. Climatewire recently pointed out that living shorelines are relatively inexpensive, are more resilient to severe storms, and can conserve fish and shorebird populations. 

Of course, you can’t plop down a living shoreline on just any old coast. They work best in sheltered tidal areas, like the Chesapeake Bay, the Puget Sound, or the Great Lakes, where violent waves won’t immediately rip everything to pieces. 

Thanks to the Army Corps of Engineers, it may soon be a lot easier to build living shorelines in places like these. The organization is considering a measure to shorten the waiting period for a permit from 215 days to a more reasonable 45.

Bert Guevara's insight:
There are better, more natural ways to protect shorelines, than massive concrete seawalls.

"Living shorelines perform the same function as their concrete counterparts — protecting communities and infrastructure from storm damage and flooding — but come with a few perks. Climatewire recently pointed out that living shorelines are relatively inexpensive, are more resilient to severe storms, and can conserve fish and shorebird populations."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Toxic Algae Blooms: Fish Are Dying ... Beaches Are Closing ... People Are Getting Sick ("what is it?")

Toxic Algae Blooms: Fish Are Dying ... Beaches Are Closing ... People Are Getting Sick ("what is it?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Florida's algae problem is the latest reminder that we must act now to protect our waters and combat climate change.

It's as thick as guacamole, but you don't want it near your chips. You don't want it in your water, either, but that's exactly where it is, a sprawling mat of toxic algae the size of Miami, spreading out across Florida's storied Lake Okeechobee and from there along major rivers to the state's Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.

Fish are dying. Beaches are closing. People are getting sick. 

"The smell is so bad it will make you gag," Mary Radabaugh told officials at a town hall meeting last week near Palm Beach. "We have red eyes and scratchy throats." 

Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency in affected areas and is pleading with Washington for assistance to cope with widespread threats to the environment and public health. 

"South Florida is facing a crisis," Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, wrote in a letter July 6 to U.S. Senate leaders. "Beaches and waterways that would normally have been crowded this past Fourth of July weekend were empty as families and vacationers heeded warnings to avoid the toxic blue-green and brown algae blooms that have formed along the waterways and even out into the Atlantic Ocean."

The algae blooms that have thrown the Sunshine State into crisis are telling us three things. First, we need to protect our waters from the pollution that breeds these toxic blooms. Next, we need to fight the climate change that brings warmer temperatures that amp up algae growth. And finally, we need to demand real action on both fronts from our elected leaders at every level.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The attack of the GREEN ALGAL BLOOM! This is what happens when we mess around with ocean biodiversity. The oceans are fighting back!

"The algae blooms that have thrown the Sunshine State into crisis are telling us three things. First, we need to protect our waters from the pollution that breeds these toxic blooms. Next, we need to fight the climate change that brings warmer temperatures that amp up algae growth. And finally, we need to demand real action on both fronts from our elected leaders at every level."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Claims a Lake, and an Identity (Bolivia's 2nd largest lake dries up, villagers starve")

Climate Change Claims a Lake, and an Identity (Bolivia's 2nd largest lake dries up, villagers starve") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

An indigenous group that survived Spanish and Inca conquest cannot handle the abrupt upheaval of global warming. Lake Poopó was more than their livelihood: It was their identity.

The water receded and the fish died. They surfaced by the tens of thousands, belly-up, and the stench drifted in the air for weeks. 

The birds that had fed on the fish had little choice but to abandon Lake Poopó, once Bolivia’s second-largest but now just a dry, salty expanse. Many of the Uru-Murato people, who had lived off its waters for generations, left as well, joining a new global march of refugees fleeing not war or persecution, but climate change. 

“The lake was our mother and our father,” said Adrián Quispe, one of five brothers who were working as fishermen and raising families here in Llapallapani. “Without this lake, where do we go?”

After surviving decades of water diversion and cyclical El Niño droughts in the Andes, Lake Poopó basically disappeared in December. The ripple effects go beyond the loss of livelihood for the Quispes and hundreds of other fishing families, beyond the migration of people forced to leave homes that are no longer viable.

The vanishing of Lake Poopó threatens the very identity of the Uru-Murato people, the oldest indigenous group in the area. They adapted over generations to the conquests of the Inca and the Spanish, but seem unable to adjust to the abrupt upheaval climate change has caused.

Only 636 Uru-Murato are estimated to remain in Llapallapani and two nearby villages. Since the fish died off in 2014, scores have left to work in lead mines or salt flats up to 200 miles away; those who stayed behind scrape by as farmers or otherwise survive on what used to be the shore.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The demise of a lake used to be unthinkable, but the 2nd largest lake in Bolivia just died in December.

“We accepted the lake was going to die someday,” Mr. Pérez said. “Now wasn’t its time.” 
Lake Poopó is one of several lakes worldwide that are vanishing because of human causes. California’s Mono Lake and Salton Sea were both diminished by water diversions; lakes in Canada and Mongolia are jeopardized by rising temperatures.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Florida's coral reef system in rapid decay, scientists say ("what was lost can no longer be returned")

Florida's coral reef system in rapid decay, scientists say ("what was lost can no longer be returned") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

The most terrifying thing lurking under the waters of the Atlantic Ocean may not come with razor sharp teeth.

Scientists say Florida's coral reef system, the third-largest in the world, is in rapid decay, with a variety of threats edging the delicate ecosystem closer to collapse sooner than anyone believed possible. 

"We didn't think this would happen for another 50 or 60 years," said Chris Langdon, a marine biologist at the University of Miami, who published a new report on the health of the reef in May. "This study showed a whole new thing we didn't even know was threatening them." 

Langdon and his team discovered that as ocean water becomes more acidic, due to carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, the structures that support the coral are beginning to disintegrate.

According to Carmichael, the outflows dump hundreds of millions of gallons of waste into the ocean every day, including substantial amounts of phosphorus, nitrogen and other substances that have made the reefs "so grossly out of balance and under attack that they don't stand a reasonable chance of recovering." 

Carmichael says that "nutrient loading," or the dumping of chemicals into the ocean water, has strengthened the coral reefs mortal enemy: Algae. 

"It's actually become the dominant species on the reef," said Carmichael, who says the algae covers the ocean floor and smothers the reef by blocking sunlight. 

"It's like a constant beating and eventually, the reef lost," he said.

Bert Guevara's insight:
More bad news for a mismanaged coral reef system. Let us not repeat the mistakes of history. Florida officials better wake up to reality.

"We will never get back the reef that was lost," she said. "I think we need to take extreme measures at this point to protect every last coral that we can."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

The biggest body of warm water on Earth is getting even bigger ("will impact on strength of cyclones")

The biggest body of warm water on Earth is getting even bigger ("will impact on strength of cyclones") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Meet the expanding Indo-Pacific warm pool.

When it comes to fundamental drivers of climate and weather across the Earth, it is hard to think of a region more important than the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool, an enormous area stretching across the Pacific and Indian oceans on both sides of the equator. 

This is, basically, the biggest body of warm water there is. Indeed, the warm pool, which is fueled by the intense sunlight striking the equator and tropics, is defined as the area where the average surface ocean temperature is greater than about 82 degrees Fahrenheit all year round (a temperature, incidentally, that is well above the threshold level needed for tropical cyclone or hurricane formation). 

The warm pool drives monsoons, tropical cyclones and much more. Its warm ocean surface is the home to deep atmospheric “convection,” or the rising of warm, moist air, which leads to atmospheric circulation and rainfall patterns that influence the entire planet. 

And the warm pool is growing. 

“It is about four or five times larger than Australia,” said Seung-Ki Min, a researcher at Pohang University of Science and Technology in South Korea and an author of a new study in Science Advances on the warm pool’s expansion. “It has been increasing about 32 percent over the last 60 years in size.” 

The new study, which Min co-authored with Evan Weller of Pohang University as well as colleagues in China, Canada and Australia, proves for what is apparently the first time that this spatial expansion — which has implications for hurricane landfalls, rising seas (warm water expands and takes up more area) and much more — is caused by human-induced climate change.

Bert Guevara's insight:
These ocean warming trends will affect the Philippines, being inside the typhoon belt. Expect stronger and longer cyclones.

"More warm water means that there are more areas conducive to the formation of tropical cyclones, and it also affects how far they can travel, in any particular direction. A storm “can survive longer, because we now have a larger area of hot water, giving more energy to the tropical cyclone,” Min said. 
"When it comes to climate change, much of the most vivid imagery is far away from the warm pool — in the rapidly warming Arctic, for instance, where sea ice is vanishing and glaciers are breaking off city-sized pieces."
more...
No comment yet.