Wangari Maathai 2.0
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Wangari Maathai 2.0
"I don’t really know why I care so much. I just have something inside me that tells me that there is a problem, and I have got to do something about it. I think that is what I would call the God in me. All of us have a God in us, and that God is the spirit that unites all life, everything that is on this planet. It must be this voice that is telling me to do something, and I am sure it’s the same voice that is speaking to everybody on this planet – at least everybody who seems to be concerned about the fate of the world, the fate of this planet."
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Abstract

Abstract | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it

Described as “a force of nature,” Wangari Muta Maathai was a Kenyan born activist, who broke down many barriers and took many unprecedented actions by blazing “a trail in whatever she did, whether it was in the environment, politics, whatever.” After obtaining her degree in Biological Sciences from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas (1964) she went on to earn a Master in Science from the University of Pittsburgh (1966). In 1971, she studied in Germany and completed her studies at the University of Nairobi, where she earned a Ph.D., and was taught veterinary Anatomy and She became the first woman in East and Central Africa to obtain a doctorate degree. She also became the first woman to become chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy in 1976, and was the first woman to become an associate professor. Dr. Maathai, was able to adapt to any environment, was known for being comfortable in all scenarios, whether in the dangerous streets of Nairobi’s slums, or in meetings with heads of states. She soon became one of the most widely respected women on the continent because of her inspiring actions and her involvement in many fields.  She was an active member of the National Council of Women of Kenya, and in 1977 she founded the Green Belt Movement, a movement whose mission was to help the environment and fight erosion by planting trees, while at the same time providing jobs for women. Throughout the movement, more than 30 million trees were planted and approximately 900,000 were given jobs, which inspired many other countries across Africa to take similar initiatives, and later lead to the establishment of a Pan African Green Belt Network in 1986. Throughout her career as an active citizen, environmentalist, feminist, politician, professor, and human rights activist, she toured the world, speaking out against environmental degradation and poverty, two things she considered thoroughly connected. Though she worked with many people and many countries throughout her career, she never lost focus on Kenya. She was constantly seeking ways to better her country and help her fellow countrymen. In 2004, Wangari Maathai was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to environmental conservation, sustainable development, democracy and peace. The Nobel committee praised Dr. Maathai for taking a “holistic approach to sustainable development that embraces democracy, human rights and women’s rights in particular.” Dr. Maathai was an innovative, inspirational figure who never stopped fighting to improve life for many across the world and preserving and conserving the environment. When asked what inspired her to take such actions, she reminisces about growing up in rural Kenya, saying, “In the course of history, there comes a time when humanity is called to shift to a new level of consciousness, to reach a higher moral ground. A time when we have to shed our fear and give hope to each other. That time is now.” 

 

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A Voice for Trees, by Wangari Maathai

In this video, Maathai talks about how the five mountains of the land provided an abundance of food and water, and no one went hungry. Unfortunately, this greatly changed because the government was cutting down the trees which tried up the land. Maathai decided to create a program to get people together to plant trees. The Green Belt Movement was created and has immensely changed the land and people's lives in Kenya. "More than 600 community groups worked on this and planted trees. Over 1 million trees have been planted in the past two years. More than 40 million trees have been planted." 

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Wangari Maathai & The Green Belt Movement

"Changing the top without the grass root is almost impossible." In this video, Wangari Maathai speaks about how she had the idea to start from the bottom and initiate change, instead of starting at the top and trickling down. This video shows different women implementing Maathai's ideas of planting trees, and provides an explanation of how poverty influences both the environment and people. It focusses on how the Green Belt Movement has impacted different communities, and how Maathai's aim is to provide the tools for effective aid.

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Amazon.com: Wangari Maathai: Books

Amazon.com: Wangari Maathai: Books | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it
Amazon.com: Wangari Maathai: Books

 

Here are some books written by Maathai and also some books that were written about her.

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Bib

"Wangari Maathai - Biography". Nobelprize.org. 9 Jan 2013 http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2004/maathai-bio.html

 

A Voice for Trees, by Wangari Maathai. Youtube. N.p., 5 Nov. 2010. Web. 4 Jan. 2013.

     <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFvv9f9u-vY&gt;.

 

 

Gettleman, Jeffrey. "Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Dies at 71." New York Times. N.p.,      26 Sept. 2011. Web. 7 Jan. 2013. <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/27/world/africa/      wangari-maathai-nobel-peace-prize-laureate-dies-at-71.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0>.

 

 

Gilson, Dave. "'I Will Disappear Into the Forest': An Interview With Wangari Maathai." Mother Jones.

     N.p., 5 Jan. 2005. Web. 4 Jan. 2013. <http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2005/01/

     root-causes-interview-wangari-maathai>.

 

 

"Key Speeches and Articles." The Green Belt Movement. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Jan. 2013.

     <http://www.greenbeltmovement.org/>.

 

 

Von Soest, Landon, dir. Wangari Maathai and The Green Belt Movement. Transient Pictures, 2010. Film.

 

 

"Wangari Maathai – Kenya 2004, Founding Member." Nobel Women's Initiative. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Jan.      2013. <http://nobelwomensinitiative.org/meet-the-laureates/wangari-maathai/>.
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The Green Belt Movement

The Green Belt Movement | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it

The Green Belt Movement was created by Wangari Maathai with help from the National Council of Women of Kenya in 1977. It is an environmental organization which seeks to help women and villages improve their environment and quality of life. Maathai was hearing Kenyan women complain about lack of food supply, drinking water, and fire wood. She realized this problem was due to streams drying up and the amount of trees in their villages, so she decided to create an organization which had women work together to plant trees, store rainwater, provide food, etc. After, the women who helped received a small amount of money for their work.After working with groups and villages, Maathai found that there were problems with their community which lead to a poor environment. These problems were the fact that the people of the villages felt disempowered and unmotivated to do selfless and honest work like protecting the environment because of distrustful leaders who let them down. Because of this, the Green Belt Movement began campaigning for less power to leaders and environmental sustainability.

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young pat's curator insight, December 7, 2015 9:33 AM

the green belt movement was created by  wangari maathai with help of women of Kenya.


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Books | The Green Belt Movement

Books | The Green Belt Movement | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it

"Unbowed", a memoir written by Wangari Maathai describes the events in her life which lead up to her idea of planting trees as a way to empower people. Being the first woman in East and Central Africa to receive a Ph.D., Maathai faced the oppressive and sexist government of Kenya. This lead Mathaai to become a political activist and feminist later on in her life. Written in 2006, this book is critically acclaimed novel and described as an "essential reading". 

 

There are more books written by Wangari Maathai, such as, "The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the Approach and Experience", "The Challenge for Africa", and "Replenishing the Earth: Spiritual Values for Healing Ourselves and the World."

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SpeechMaathai.pdf

In 2009, Wangari Maathai addressed the UN Special Session on Climate Change, and asked the world leaders to commit resources to helping African nations recognize the destructive impacts of climate change. She tells the leaders that this is the time to commit to concrete actions that will benefit the countries and millions of people who are already suffering from the effects of climate change. This speech states very clearly who is being impacted, how they are being impacted and what actions need to be taken to prevent suffering and destruction to people and the environment. She addressed world leaders with confidence and wasn't afraid to tell them that they weren't adequately addressing the issue. It is not only informative, but it is also inspiring to read how passionate she was, and how she was able to form concrete, reasonable solutions to the problem of climate change.

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Wangari Maathai – Nobel Women's Initiative

Wangari Maathai – Nobel Women's Initiative | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it

In 2004, Wangari Maathai was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in the Green Belt Movement. The award gave her worldwide awareness of her organization and herself. She became the first African woman to receive a Nobel Peace Prize

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"I Will Disappear Into the Forest": An Interview With Wangari Maathai

"I Will Disappear Into the Forest": An Interview With Wangari Maathai | Wangari Maathai 2.0 | Scoop.it
The late Nobel Peace Prize winner talks about sowing the seeds of democracy in Kenya.

 

Shortly after she received the Nobel Peace Prize, Wangari Maathai spoke with Mother Jones in the interview provided. She and Mother Jones discuss a plethora of topics in this interview, ranging from how she started her work, to the stereotypes Westerners have of the African Nations. In this article, Maathai’s achievements stand out and the fact that she erased the distinctions between environmentalism, feminism, democratization and human rights advocacy is remarkable.

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