Walkerteach Geo
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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish?
Luke Walker's insight:

Here is an incredible resource on language.

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What's on the Other Side of the Ocean?

What's on the Other Side of the Ocean? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
For anyone who's ever been on a beach and curious.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

Ever wonder what you can see from the coast? Here's a map that explains it all!

Think of the implications for relative location! 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:32 PM

For those that are critical of viral maps, what geographic and spatial relationships does this this map not convey?  What is good and bad about the cartographic design of this image?

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, August 6, 2014 9:21 AM

Use this for the warm-up on the first day of school and you'll have their interest all year.

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Iraq and Syria: the situation in six maps

Iraq and Syria: the situation in six maps | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
What are the forces at work in Iraq and Syria that have brought us to the current conflict?

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

A great collection of maps that brings a historical context to the current situation in the modern Middle East, specifically Iraq and Syria.

If you like this link, be sure to seek out Sir Archibald Mapsalot III under the video tag. It will bring some comedic value to your thinking.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 9:11 AM

These articles that use a series of maps are becoming increasingly popular.  In what ways are these map/articles effective? 

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 5, 2014 12:51 AM

A great collection of maps that brings a historical context to the current situation in the modern Middle East, specifically Iraq and Syria.

If you like this link, be sure to seek out Sir Archibald Mapsalot. You can find that video under the Middle East tag. Check it out for further insight.

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:57 PM

Great tool to show students how human use of natural resources can change landscapes and have permanent impacts on geographical landmarks such as the aerial sea. How do we stop it? Can we undo the damage done? How do we prevent these tragedies from happening in the future?

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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Hunger Portal

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Hunger Portal | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Go here to learn more about the subject of world hunger and food security on a global scale.

What connections do you see to the core-periphery model discussed in class? 

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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Map: What if the largest countries had the biggest populations?

Map: What if the largest countries had the biggest populations? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

An interesting perspective on the world map. Interesting things to make note of:

1) The US, Brazil, Yemen, Ireland don't move.

2) North and South Korea are still next to one another.

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

Why do some countries move and others don't?

What does this tell you about the population sizes of the "West" vs. the "Rest"?

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Tim Wang's comment, October 26, 2012 10:28 AM
I think it is a pretty good idea, that not all the poor countries are squashed together. That somehow some of the rich countries that have big population can live beside the poor. They can help each other. The west needs labor, the rest needs money.
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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


Via Seth Dixon
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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

Kedryn bray's curator insight, March 15, 9:45 AM
I think the United states does have many invisible cultural borders like the way people use certain words like soda or pop or coke. These define where different types of people love and it shows different sides of America. We are split up by many different kinds of small borders but those borders sometimes change the way we all speak and do things.
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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Lalitesh Katragadda: Making maps to fight disaster, build economies | Video on TED.com

TED Talks As of 2005, only 15 percent of the world was mapped. This slows the delivery of aid after a disaster -- and hides the economic potential of unused lands and unknown roads.

 

Great TED talk in under 3 minutes. It highlights the importance of mapping our world and how we can improve our society through such efforts. Really makes a great argument for untapped global potential.

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How to create a map using BatchGeo

Quick 1 minute tutorial on using BatchGeo to create a map. This example shows copying data straight from Wikipedia and mapping, but you can also use spreadsh...

 

check out batchgeo.com ... it's a great tool for creating online maps.

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Google Street View Adds 400,000 Km of Roads, Biggest Update in History - Softpedia

Google Street View Adds 400,000 Km of Roads, Biggest Update in History - Softpedia | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Google Street View Adds 400,000 Km of Roads, Biggest Update in History...including HUALIEN, TAIWAN!

One thing that I have noticed since moving to Taiwan is that some places are very much overlooked in google maps. This announcement is heartening, but also a greater indication of the expansion of geographic information systems and online mapping. 

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The US government does not want you going to any of these places

The US government does not want you going to any of these places | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Uncle Sam even frowns upon your weekend in Cancun.
Luke Walker's insight:

What shapes political opinion? What regions do governments create? How does this map affect your perception of place? 

Notice how 2 of the regions are considered dangerous or unstable and we draw heavily upon the resources there for our economy?


Interesting... 

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

Mapping migration patterns and demographics by state.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 16, 2014 9:54 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving to the South.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

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Snickers Bar on Sourcemap

Snickers Bar on Sourcemap | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The open directory of supply chains and carbon footprints
Luke Walker's insight:

Luke Walker's insight:

Ever wonder how the global supply chain works? Check out this website to see how the global economy works. This gives some insight into where the various parts of global market products come from and where they are manufactured. The only piece of this that isn't shown is where they shipped off to be sold.

This particular sourcemap represents the supply chain of Snickers Bars. Click "browse" at the top to see others that have been created. 

Questions to Ponder:

How does this relate to globalization?
How does this affect countries of the core (United States)?
How does this affect countries of the periphery (South America, etc.)?

Is this system good or bad in your opinion? Explain. 

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MAP REGIONS TO STUDY.pdf - Google Drive

MAP REGIONS TO STUDY.pdf - Google Drive | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Study this map for your world regions.

You should also be familiar with where key terms, and topics discussed in class belong on this map. 

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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:32 AM

Must Know info. Need I say more?

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Colorado River Map -- National Geographic

Colorado River Map -- National Geographic | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Explore an interactive map of Colorado River diversions, dams, ecosystems, stories, pictures, video, and more
Luke Walker's insight:

This website is interactive and allows one to examine the river under differing amounts of precipitation, and learn more about diversions, dams and species associated with the river.

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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


Via Seth Dixon
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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 9, 2014 11:44 PM

Unit 1

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United States MapMaker Kit

United States MapMaker Kit | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
MapMaker Kit. Download, print, and assemble maps of the United States in a variety of sizes. The mega map occupies a large wall, or can be used on the floor.

 

Have I ever wondered about how I can make a giant map? Why yes, I have indeed.

 

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West Wing - Why are we changing maps?

West Wing - Why are we changing maps? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

From season 2 - episode 16 "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail" It's "Big Block of Cheese" Day, which means that Leo sends grumbling sta...See it on Scoop.it, via American History...

Great video segment on map perspective. The debate between Mercator and Peters projections, and social inequality through map making. 

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Map as Art

Map as Art | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, ...

 

Maps can be creative works of art. Check out this creative use of mapping ideas in today's world. One of the images comes from Taipei!

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The Global Scale of Migrant Money Flows - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com

A new study suggests that 1 in 10 people on the planet directly benefit from money sent home by migrants working in other countries. Here are figures detailing that money's impact on developing nations in 2006.

 

Excellent map that details global money flows, i.e. the migration of money. Remittances is a key issue in the global economy and a great statement about the relationship that exists between the "west" and the "rest"

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Selecting a Map Projection

Selecting a Map Projection | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Video. Cartographers at National Geographic discuss how they select an appropriate map projection for the September 2012 magazine map supplement.
There is no one perfect map projection that fits all circumstances and situations.

 

 

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