Walkerteach Geo
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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Luke Walker's insight:

Mind blowing and utterly ridiculous.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 AM

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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American Human Development Project

American Human Development Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Measure of America is the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation.

 

The stated mission of the American Human Development Program is to provide easy-to-use yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well-being and opportunity in America and to stimulate fact-based dialogue about issues such as health, education and income.  This is another treasure trove of maps, charts, graphs, raw data all begging to be used as to enhance a student project.  This would be perfect to introduce after teaching about the Human Development Index.  


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an amazing tool that allows you to look at the human development index (HDI) across the United States by county, state, or major urban area. You can sort the data according to racial demographics as well. It's a powerful tool that helps to answer "What factors affect human development?"

Follow the link and then choose "Tools" and "Interactive Maps" to find the program.

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:03 PM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

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Local Life Expectancies (Population)

Local Life Expectancies (Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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How long does it take to earn a Big Mac?

How long does it take to earn a Big Mac? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
THE size of your pay packet may be important, but so is its purchasing power. Helpfully, a UBS report published this week offers a handy guide to how long it takes a...

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) How does this define the status of the West vs. the Rest?

2) How can this help you to better understand the lives of people living in the West vs the Rest?

3) How much has the Big Mac globalized?

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Gaza Water Confined & Contaminated | Visualizing Palestine

Gaza Water Confined & Contaminated | Visualizing Palestine | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Here is an interesting infographic that was posted to Flowing Data today.  It looks at water accessibility and quality issues in Gaza.  Very useful for highlighting the impact of conflict on basic human needs and natural resources.

 

 

Water, polution and accessibility in Gaza.


Via Jamie Strickland
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The Story of a FreshDirect Order

The Story of a FreshDirect Order | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
This is a great infographic from the NY Times that is featured this week on the Times' Learning Network site.  I am planning adapting the lesson plan (designed for Common Core ELA) for my World Food Problems class this Spring.

 

Infographic. One topic that combines the issues of food production and globalization in a box.

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we think about Gangnam style's diffusion? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. The National Post crunches the data
Luke Walker's insight:

This graphic gives a glimpse at how economic development affects human development of women in the world. It considers data of health, education etc.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Why focus on women?
2) Why measure these items? What have they got to do with “development”? Choose 1 and explain in detail.

 

3) Based on the information in this chart, what’s the connection between economic development and human development? Why do you suppose this connection exists? 

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Tinya Chang's comment, February 20, 2013 2:54 AM
1. Women take up half of the population.
2. From the data recorded in the category "expected number of years in school," we can see how educated most people in the country are. In order for countries to be able to provide education for their people, they need to develop education systems along with economic supports. Education can also help individuals develop skills that will strengthen the S.P.E.C. of the country.
3. Humans can only develop certain skills if they have financial support (education). An undeveloped human cannot contribute much to the economy. This connection exists because each development would not be possible without the other.
Powell Hung's comment, February 20, 2013 3:09 AM
1) This research focused on women because in many countries, male and female are not equal, so, they do this to show that which countries take women as important and which countries do not.
2) They measure this to see the birth rate in each countries, women who get education in each countries , and the importance of women in each countries. For example, by looking at the life expectancy at birth, you can know the birth rates in a certain country.
3) The connection between economic development and human development comes in many kinds. If there are developed people in a certain country, then the economy of the country might increase by their help. Then, because of the developed economy, many people can have a good education and also can have a job that can get a lot of money. This connection exits because many people that has a lot of wealth or people who are very developed are in the countries that are developed.
Ivy Buu's comment, February 20, 2013 3:57 AM
1) Women are the only sources to repopulate the earth. Without women, the world could not go on or develop.
2) The reason they measure these items is to compare countries and their level of development. According to the percentage of a country's TFR, we can tell how many women in that country are actually receiving the right education. For a country to be developed well, they all have to follow the order of SPEC. They have to have a good economy, government, connections, and national personality. For a country to have all of those things, their citizens have to receive proper education to help that country develop, including women.
3) For citizens to be able to develop, they have to receive proper education so they will be able to contribute to their country in the future. To receive good education, that country would have to be able to support their citizens enough so they could have a good living and learning environment. That is where a good economy counts. To have properly educated citizens, a country will need a financially supportive government. Without money and order, a country would not have the materials or necessities to educate their people. One cannot exist without the other.
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10 Best Tools for Creating Infographics

10 Best Tools for Creating Infographics | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
We have a list of 10 Best Tools for Creating Infographics. Making infographics from scratch can be a tough as and not all the people can do it.

This is where some tools can help — numerous resources are available to help you while designing and creating infographics. Graphics and visualization samples from each website are included in this list, so you can visit each link and see the infographics directly from the source.

Check out this list of 10 Best Tools for Creating Infographics, and find the ones that suit your needs the best...


You never know when you may need to bring some extra flair to your projects in class. Here is some food for thought and resources to help out. Might want to keep infographics in mind for your upcoming textbook project.



 


Via Lauren Moss, Pearl Jonas, Luke Walker
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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population)

China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy? 

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Obesity: A Big Fat Problem For America’s Future

Obesity: A Big Fat Problem For America’s Future | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Like so many phenomena, there is a spatial nature to obesity (higher in the United States than global averages and higher in the deep South than national averages).  This infographic compiles statistics that are 'food for thought.' 


Via Seth Dixon
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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.

 

 

Really cool infographic that let's you think about what it would take to produce your own food.


Via Seth Dixon, Jamie Strickland
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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 
Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

 

The public health of a country is a strong indicator of that country's development. AIDS/HIV is a big problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Check out this infographic to learn more.

 

 

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Great visuals on the status of women in the world.

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