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About the IMF Overview

About the IMF Overview | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

 

  “The IMF works to foster global growth and economic stability. It provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.”

Learning what you have about the IMF, how it works, and its role in poor countries like Jamaica; what are your reactions to this mission statement? 

Reflect and explain in a short response (10 sentences min).

1 pt -- Response is given but is confusing or underdeveloped (<10 sentences)

2 pts -- complete response is given but it lacks original or creative contribution to the discussion (i.e. you are mostly repeating what others have said above your post)
3 pts -- response is insightful, shows you really understood and thought about the issue. You contribute an original thought that helps the online discussion develop positively.

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Jonathan Lai's comment, March 19, 2013 2:43 AM
The IMF was created to prevent or fix economic issues around the world to avoid another Great Depression like the one that was a big cause of WWII. I believe that if their written goals are not outright lies, then they are only following the word of those claims. If they actually were going to follow both the word and the soul of their claims, conditions in their loans would be somewhere from very little to none. The way it is being done now, countries that loan money, such as Jamaica, only benefit a little. Meanwhile, rich business people mostly from the West gain more money than they already have. Instead of assisting with the poverty countries have, those countries are going even more in debt as being unable to pay back the loans with interest, conditions that hurt their economies, and conditions that hurt their education. While is theory the IMF is an international cooperation, that cooperation's power lies only with a small group. And while the IMF says they promote stability, they do not mention where the economy will stabilize. At this point poor countries are very stably getting poorer and are quite stable in their poverty. And the "balance of payment" is very elaborately balanced towards the other side.
Ben's comment, March 19, 2013 3:59 AM
The IMF's supposedly purpose was to help countries that had economical problems such as Jamaica. As seen in Jamaica, it is really just a trap that helps no one else but the IMF itself. The IMF exploits the countries in need when the countries like Jamaica have no where else to go. The IMF then lends the country money but adding conditions that makes Jamaican and other countries have to compete with the rest of the world or closing down local farms and restaurants. It causes a chain reaction while the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. If the IMF doesn't really help the countries in need of economical help, the IMF should be abolished, for they are just famous frauds that make people believe the IMF can help you even though they just take advantage of you and leave you with less than when you started. They say they develop nations, but if you take a look at Jamaica, you can see that they are really doing the opposite. When they say they are reducing poverty, are they meaning they are increasing it, because they are just making people poorer and poorer. If they really want to help the countries, they should be giving out free money to help the countries in poverty, for they aren't doing what they say they are doing.
Emily Fang's comment, March 19, 2013 5:36 AM
I think the IMF was created purposely to earn money by saying they are helping the poor countries that are in need. They make a loan to a country that is undeveloped and gives so much conditions causing the poor countries unable to rise their economy but the IMF instead of giving them more time, they add interests that are unreasonable for a poor country to be able to pay back. The IMF, in my opinion, is just a corporation that is intended to take away all the money of the poor countries. They protect their name by saying they are to help the poor countries. If the IMF is really there to help the world economy rise, they should take off many of the conditions and decrease the interest rate. They should give the undeveloped countries the time to save their economy before they are asked to pay back the money.
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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm


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Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 8:22 PM
The Coca-Cola company has become an American Icon that speaks the universal language and trade of many. With many manufacturing facilities around the globe, Coca-Cola will continue to network the world, connecting every country to each other.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:42 AM

This was an interesting but short article.  It is interesting to realize that Coke is sold almost universally worldwide with just a few exceptions.  It is truly the poster boy for globalization.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 10:16 AM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:26 PM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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Gangnam Style: Three Reasons K-Pop Is Taking Over The World : NPR

The viral hit isn't a fluke. South Korea has been cultivating a global music business for decades.

Check out the underlying economics of the success story that is Gangnam Style. Listen and better understand how a Korean phenomena can take off on a global scale. 

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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 8:21 PM

I believe this is a wise decision by McDonald's to adjust their menu for the people of India who are vegetarian. India's population is over one billion now; many of those people are vegetarian. McDonald's is one of the world's most successful fast food chains and they have a chance to lure millions of new customers into their restaurant. This is a great example of a global company making small changes in order to attract people with specific customs and cultural norms. 

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 24, 9:49 AM

When one thinks about huge brands like McDonalds, very specific food items may come to mind.  These items, like the Big Mac in the United States and other select countries, are very iconic in terms of representation to its consumers and competitors.  However, traveling to a different country would expose one to the fact that the cuisine at a restaurant owned by the same company may be quite different.  McDonalds is a master at globalization because they have created a huge reputation and have a lot of power in the global market.  At the same time, they have tuned in to the local cultures and their values and traditions.  In places like India, this is very neccesary if McDonalds is to maintain a strong market there because a large portion of the population is vegetarian.  Not only would they not enjoy eating a Big Mac, they may be insulted by its presence on the menu and feel generally ignored by the company in terms of their traditions and beliefs.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 3:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

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Global Metal (Trailer)

In GLOBAL METAL, directors Scot McFadyen and Sam Dunn set out to discover how the West's most maligned musical genre -- heavy metal -- has impacted the world...

Globalization has had an enormous impact on culture and its spread worldwide. This documentary film discusses the impact of globalization on the music subgenre of heavy metal. It shows us where metal has spread and the different forms it has taken based on location.

Metal is even here in Taiwan.

Check out Chthonic's Quell the Souls of Sing Ling Temple: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8LbIMcAjpQ

Go here for the story and meaning behind the song's lyrics:
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2011/10/24/2003516559/1

 

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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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'Gangnam Style': Crossing Over in the New World

'Gangnam Style': Crossing Over in the New World | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

If America can make a movie called Kung Fu Panda, and have it become a number one hit in China, then it follows that a Korean artist, too, can rise to the top of the charts in America.

Really interesting article that focuses on Gangnam style in a larger discussion of global and local culture and the role that technology and globalization have played in promoting things like Gangnam style into a worldwide phenomena.  

Questions to ponder:

 

1) What has allowed to Gangnam style to spread across the world?
2) Why does the author compare this to other events like Bouazzizi setting himself on fire in Tunisia? 

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Electronic Wasteland

Electronic Wasteland | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Photographer Pieter Hugo documents the Agbogbloshie slum.
Luke Walker's insight:

This photo gallery of images from the electronics dumps in Ghana. The developed world produces an enormous amount of electronic waste that cannot be recycled given that many of the materials used to produce computers, cell phones, etc. are highyl toxic. Local people search through the dump, to retrieve precious metals and components from the wasted electronics. The remainder is burned releasing toxins into the air.

Questions to Ponder:

How can computers be redesigned to avoid this problem?

How can governments react to this situation to stop the export of electronic waste to places like Africa, China, etc.?
How can electronic manufacturers be held more accountable for the quality of their products? 

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Luke Walker's comment, February 21, 2013 9:42 PM
Check out this related NYTimes article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/24/technology/24junk.html?_r=0
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Globalization in a Nutshell

Globalization in a Nutshell | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Yeah, it's a commercial, but it's really cool. 


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Strange McDonald's Menu Items Around the World

At Travora, we love to travel, and our blog features the latest in travel news, hotel and restaurant reviews, videos and some of the best travel photography on the net.

 

 

A pretty extensive collection of stimulus diffusion items at McDonald's. This was found by one of my students.

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How long does it take to earn a Big Mac?

How long does it take to earn a Big Mac? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
THE size of your pay packet may be important, but so is its purchasing power. Helpfully, a UBS report published this week offers a handy guide to how long it takes a...

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) How does this define the status of the West vs. the Rest?

2) How can this help you to better understand the lives of people living in the West vs the Rest?

3) How much has the Big Mac globalized?

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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

NYTimes video: "Skateistan" | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:16 AM

While visiting other countries, people get a glimpse of how others live. In Australia, children are allowed to play all sorts of games and sports for recreational fun. In Afghanistan however, this is not the case. What this Australian man is doing is helping out the Afghan youth. They need some inspiration and in order for them to get that they need outside sources (and people) like this man.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:35 AM

This one man is trying to give these children something of their own to hold onto. They don't have the activities and recreational opportunities that children do in Australia.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 9:18 AM

The Skateistan organization has provided Afghan boys and girls with the opportunity for recreation.  Recreation is important for children to make friends, but more importantly in a tense country with many different ethnic backgrounds, it fosters community building and exposure to other people.  This organization has given kids freedom and job opportunities that are actually rewarding.  The blending of cultural interests illustrates how very similar people are; the Afghan kids are just as willing to participate in the unknown sport of skateboarding as any kid would be from a society where it is a popular sport.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:23 AM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

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The Story of a FreshDirect Order

The Story of a FreshDirect Order | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
This is a great infographic from the NY Times that is featured this week on the Times' Learning Network site.  I am planning adapting the lesson plan (designed for Common Core ELA) for my World Food Problems class this Spring.

 

Infographic. One topic that combines the issues of food production and globalization in a box.

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youth in Cambodia.

 

This video is a great example of cross-cultural interactions in the era of globalization.  Urban youth culture of the United States is spread to Cambodia through a former refugee (with a personally complex political geography).  What geographic themes are evident in this video? How is geography being reshaped and by what forces?


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2:43 PM

This man was originally from California, but was kicked out of America and now lives in Cambodia. “KK” introduces break dancing, rapping and even taught basic computer skills to the at risk children of Cambodia. The children are some of the best break-dancers I have ever seen. A man by the name of "KK" inspired and gave the youth of Cambodia hope. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:00 AM

Bringing different cultures into different lifestyles is an important part of cultural history. Every culture is linked in some way to another one. What this break dancer does to help these kids is awesome. As a former Cambodian refugee he had never been to Cambodia but was sent back there. His L.A./past gang influences have helped many kids to stay away from gangs and to take up schooling and break dancing instead.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 12:05 PM

Urban United States culture has been introduced to Cambodia's youth by K.K.  K.K., who lived in California his whole life as the child of Cambodian refugees, was deported to Cambodia, a place he had never even visited before, due to a felony charge.  K.K created an organization which taught Cambodia's youth about HIV protection, computers, and drugs.  He made his organization attractive to Cambodian youth by introducing them break-dancing and rapping.  In the U.S. these activities are often viewed in a negative light, but K.K. used them positively by introducing them to a population with no prior knowledge of them.  He also recreated his own identity by mixing his new, vastly unknown Cambodian experience with his life experiences from the U.S.   He is an example of the many people who struggle with forming a more global identity in our global world.  This organization targets at-risk kids and K.K. is probably trying to direct their lives the way he may wish someone had done for him. 

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we think about Gangnam style's diffusion? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 11:27 AM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL