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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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WE THE ECONOMY 20 Short Films You Can't Afford To Miss

WE THE ECONOMY 20 Short Films You Can't Afford To Miss | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Economy. Everyone’s talking about it, but who can explain it? 20 award­-winning directors and 10 of our most respected economists add their voice to the chorus with a thought­-provoking short­-film series.
Luke Walker's insight:

An INCREDIBLE series that looks into a few essential questions on the nature of the American and global economy through a series of 20 short films.

Brought to you by Morgan Spurlock the creative genius behind Supersize Me and 30 Days 

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The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine

The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Price of Gold: In dollars and suffering, it's never been higher.
Luke Walker's insight:

An insightful article about the extraction of gold.

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31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World – The Awesome Daily - Your daily dose of awesome

31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World – The Awesome Daily - Your daily dose of awesome | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an interesting collection that touches on a lot of relevant themes. It should raise a lot of questions for you. The most important thing to keep in mind is what's the state of the world according to these images, and how do the people and places represented compare and contrast?

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CT Blake's curator insight, October 5, 2014 10:47 AM

I don't know HOW to use this yet....but I'm determined to make a lesson out of these pics.

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Congo's Bloody Coltan | Pulitzer Center

Congo's Bloody Coltan | Pulitzer Center | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

So I found this video footage of Congo's Coltan industry. I thought it would go very well with our class discussion of externalities and the true cost of the electronics and products we consume.

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25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries

25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The real powerful states of the world.
Luke Walker's insight:

What if 25 US Mega Corporations were ranked against the GDP of countries?

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America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall

America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The coal economy in Central Appalachia is in an unprecedented freefall. Which isn't making it easier for workers to move on.

Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is relevant to early posts about coalfields in West Virginia.

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Nick Smith's curator insight, September 9, 2014 12:24 PM

This effects the eastern part of our state and our country overall. The fall of the coal field is hurting our economy.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 5:58 PM

(North America post 3)
Built upon from class today, this article discusses the hardship many Appalachian families are feeling as the coal mining business continues to evolve and industrialize. Although coal was the major 'boom' behind many of these towns, the 'bust' hits more than just those laid off by the industry. Like a chain reaction, other families and their businesses suffer; less income leads to less eating out leads to less income for restaurants, and it goes on and on.  This article is also good at showing that geography is more than spatial and economic: on certain levels, it's also relational, personal, cultural, and historic, giving residents strong feelings behind their decisions to stay.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 10:44 AM

This video really shows the relationship between sense of place versus economic geography. Even though the town is no longer the rich mining town it once was, the remaining residents still cling to the past and their sense of identity remains strong. It demonstrates that cultural heritage is a powerful factor that can remain long after dramatic economic changes. Even though there are few opportunities left in the town and the majority of its young people leave for greener pastures, some residents still identify so strongly with the area that they are willing to do whatever they can to revitalize their town.

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Blue Gold : World Water Wars (Official Full Length Film)

Please visit http://www.bluegold-worldwaterwars.com and consider donating to the filmmaker if you enjoyed the film! There you can also link to vendors to buy...
Luke Walker's insight:
Luke Walker's insight:

This is the full documentary used in class. You may use this youtube link as a means of reviewing the film when working on your assignment from class.

Always remember, when quoting or paraphrasing other people's work be sure to give credit. 

Go to this link for more on MLA citations of films: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/09/

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Brandon Sherrill's comment, May 26, 2014 10:57 AM
Really? Water is everywhere instead of people fighting able I think we should come to together and find a cheap, effective way to purify salt water with the ice caps melting and turning into salt water I think we should be looking into ways to convert salt water to fresh water
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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Luke Walker's insight:

Mind blowing and utterly ridiculous.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 AM

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm


Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:42 PM

This was an interesting but short article.  It is interesting to realize that Coke is sold almost universally worldwide with just a few exceptions.  It is truly the poster boy for globalization.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:43 PM

GEOGRAPHY: North Korea, although one of the smallest nations in the world, is still arguably the most defiant. They're completely cut-off from the outside world, and they've displayed this once again by not selling Coke in their borders. Being a classic American drink, Coca-Cola is likely viewed as an enemy to North Korea, judging by their hatred of America and its citizens. They're one of only two countries in the world not to sell Coke, and this just goes to show that even though they're physically connected to us, they are isolated from the world.

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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Amy in ATL's curator insight, February 16, 8:04 PM

This is a quick and easy way to understand the difference between glocalization and globalization using the basic needs...FOOD!

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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Aboard a Cargo Colossus

Aboard a Cargo Colossus | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest container ships, longer than the Eiffel Tower is high, are a symbol of an increasingly global marketplace. But they also face strong economic headwinds.
Luke Walker's insight:

Check out this amazing article and video about what cargo ships are like in our global economy.

It's absolutely incredible. 

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FRONTLINE/World Ghana: Digital Dumping Ground | PBS

FRONTLINE/World Ghana: Digital Dumping Ground | PBS | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
As this month's digital television conversion makes tens of millions of analog TV's obsolete, and Americans continue to trash old computers and cell phones at alarming rates, FRONTLINE/World presents a global investigation into the dirty secret of the digital age -- the dumping of hundreds of millions of pounds of toxic electronic waste across the developing world. The report also uncovers another dangerous bi-product of a disposable culture – data fraud, as thousands of old hard drives are finding their way into criminal hands.
Luke Walker's insight:

How does this relate to Story of Stuff: Electronics?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sW_7i6T_H78 

Check out this 20 minutes video on the community that surrounds one of the world's most active e-waste dumping ground. 

For additional reading check out these articles:

http://www.newsweek.com/ghanas-e-waste-dump-seeps-poison-68385

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2013/10/inside-ghana-electronic-wasteland-2013103012852580288.html ;

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USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images

USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

“These are the eerie images that show the collapse of America's industrial heritage as the rust-belt spread across previously proud cities that drove the US through the great Depression.”


Via David Worth, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

When we talk about globalization and the outsourcing of one country's industry to another location it might difficult to visualize the impact that is made by that outsourcing. This collection of photos captures the remnants of industry found in the American "Rust Belt."

I grew up in this region, and the widespread impact of outsourcing is apparent. For the first few decades following WWII areas in surrounding cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Cleveland were known for being incredibly vibrant and productive. These pictures capture what was left behind when these industries globalized and outsourced to places such as Northern Mexico and the east coast of China.

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David Worth's curator insight, October 2, 2014 2:46 PM
Really good set of images from a soon to be demolished power station.
patrimodus's curator insight, October 2, 2014 3:39 PM

belles photos rouillées

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From Poverty to Power » The world's top 100 economies: 53 countries, 34 cities and 13 corporations

From Poverty to Power » The world's top 100 economies: 53 countries, 34 cities and 13 corporations | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Check out the chart, and check out the update link (page 3) to see an even more accurate account that excludes cities.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Looking at the cities and countries, which areas of the world are producing and consuming the most?

2) Looking at the corporations, how might the position of these corporations relate to their level of consumption and production? How might it relate to their ecological footprint?

3) How does their financial position of these countries and corporations grant them power in the materials economy (the linear model from Story of Stuff)? 

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Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 11:27 AM

units 1 & 7

dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 2014 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

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About the IMF Overview

About the IMF Overview | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

 

  “The IMF works to foster global growth and economic stability. It provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.”

Learning what you have about the IMF, how it works, and its role in poor countries like Jamaica; what are your reactions to this mission statement? 

Reflect and explain in a short response (10 sentences min).

1 pt -- Response is given but is confusing or underdeveloped (<10 sentences)

2 pts -- complete response is given but it lacks original or creative contribution to the discussion (i.e. you are mostly repeating what others have said above your post)
3 pts -- response is insightful, shows you really understood and thought about the issue. You contribute an original thought that helps the online discussion develop positively.

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Jonathan Lai's comment, March 19, 2013 5:43 AM
The IMF was created to prevent or fix economic issues around the world to avoid another Great Depression like the one that was a big cause of WWII. I believe that if their written goals are not outright lies, then they are only following the word of those claims. If they actually were going to follow both the word and the soul of their claims, conditions in their loans would be somewhere from very little to none. The way it is being done now, countries that loan money, such as Jamaica, only benefit a little. Meanwhile, rich business people mostly from the West gain more money than they already have. Instead of assisting with the poverty countries have, those countries are going even more in debt as being unable to pay back the loans with interest, conditions that hurt their economies, and conditions that hurt their education. While is theory the IMF is an international cooperation, that cooperation's power lies only with a small group. And while the IMF says they promote stability, they do not mention where the economy will stabilize. At this point poor countries are very stably getting poorer and are quite stable in their poverty. And the "balance of payment" is very elaborately balanced towards the other side.
Ben's comment, March 19, 2013 6:59 AM
The IMF's supposedly purpose was to help countries that had economical problems such as Jamaica. As seen in Jamaica, it is really just a trap that helps no one else but the IMF itself. The IMF exploits the countries in need when the countries like Jamaica have no where else to go. The IMF then lends the country money but adding conditions that makes Jamaican and other countries have to compete with the rest of the world or closing down local farms and restaurants. It causes a chain reaction while the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. If the IMF doesn't really help the countries in need of economical help, the IMF should be abolished, for they are just famous frauds that make people believe the IMF can help you even though they just take advantage of you and leave you with less than when you started. They say they develop nations, but if you take a look at Jamaica, you can see that they are really doing the opposite. When they say they are reducing poverty, are they meaning they are increasing it, because they are just making people poorer and poorer. If they really want to help the countries, they should be giving out free money to help the countries in poverty, for they aren't doing what they say they are doing.
Emily Fang's comment, March 19, 2013 8:36 AM
I think the IMF was created purposely to earn money by saying they are helping the poor countries that are in need. They make a loan to a country that is undeveloped and gives so much conditions causing the poor countries unable to rise their economy but the IMF instead of giving them more time, they add interests that are unreasonable for a poor country to be able to pay back. The IMF, in my opinion, is just a corporation that is intended to take away all the money of the poor countries. They protect their name by saying they are to help the poor countries. If the IMF is really there to help the world economy rise, they should take off many of the conditions and decrease the interest rate. They should give the undeveloped countries the time to save their economy before they are asked to pay back the money.
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Inside an Amazon Warehouse


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

Think back to our materials economy system.

Where do images like this fit?

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noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 8:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

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Gangnam Style: Three Reasons K-Pop Is Taking Over The World : NPR

The viral hit isn't a fluke. South Korea has been cultivating a global music business for decades.

Check out the underlying economics of the success story that is Gangnam Style. Listen and better understand how a Korean phenomena can take off on a global scale. 

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60 minutes: India's love affair with gold

60 minutes: India's love affair with gold | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
60 Minutes on CBS News: India's love affair with gold - "No gold, no wedding," is a saying in India, indicating the importance of gold to Indian culture and tradition. Byron Pitts reports on India's obsession with gold.

 

Cultural values strongly impact consumption patterns.  India's preference for gold, combined with South Asia's growing population, also leads to environmental impacts around the world as India's obsession for gold drives the global market, accounting for 1/3 of the trade.  This video explores the cultural (and economic) logic behind the enormous importance of gold jewelry in Indian society.      


Via Seth Dixon
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The Global Scale of Migrant Money Flows - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com

A new study suggests that 1 in 10 people on the planet directly benefit from money sent home by migrants working in other countries. Here are figures detailing that money's impact on developing nations in 2006.

 

Excellent map that details global money flows, i.e. the migration of money. Remittances is a key issue in the global economy and a great statement about the relationship that exists between the "west" and the "rest"

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