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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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Op-Ed Columnist - Where Sweatshops Are a Dream - NYTimes.com

Op-Ed Columnist - Where Sweatshops Are a Dream - NYTimes.com | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
What the world’s most impoverished people need isn’t fewer sweatshops, but more of them.
Luke Walker's insight:

Are sweatshops a good thing or a bad thing?

Here's one op-ed that supports sweatshops reported from a landfill in Cambodia.

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Protests Persuade Russell Athletic to Rehire Honduran Workers - NYTimes.com

Protests Persuade Russell Athletic to Rehire Honduran Workers - NYTimes.com | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The college anti-sweatshop movement persuaded Russell Athletic to agree to rehire 1,200 workers in Honduras.
Luke Walker's insight:

An anti-sweatshop movement in the US convinced a sportswear company to reopen a factory in Honduras that shutdown after works unionized.

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FRONTLINE/World Ghana: Digital Dumping Ground | PBS

FRONTLINE/World Ghana: Digital Dumping Ground | PBS | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
As this month's digital television conversion makes tens of millions of analog TV's obsolete, and Americans continue to trash old computers and cell phones at alarming rates, FRONTLINE/World presents a global investigation into the dirty secret of the digital age -- the dumping of hundreds of millions of pounds of toxic electronic waste across the developing world. The report also uncovers another dangerous bi-product of a disposable culture – data fraud, as thousands of old hard drives are finding their way into criminal hands.
Luke Walker's insight:

How does this relate to Story of Stuff: Electronics?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sW_7i6T_H78 

Check out this 20 minutes video on the community that surrounds one of the world's most active e-waste dumping ground. 

For additional reading check out these articles:

http://www.newsweek.com/ghanas-e-waste-dump-seeps-poison-68385

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2013/10/inside-ghana-electronic-wasteland-2013103012852580288.html ;

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USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images

USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

“These are the eerie images that show the collapse of America's industrial heritage as the rust-belt spread across previously proud cities that drove the US through the great Depression.”


Via David Worth, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

When we talk about globalization and the outsourcing of one country's industry to another location it might difficult to visualize the impact that is made by that outsourcing. This collection of photos captures the remnants of industry found in the American "Rust Belt."

I grew up in this region, and the widespread impact of outsourcing is apparent. For the first few decades following WWII areas in surrounding cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Cleveland were known for being incredibly vibrant and productive. These pictures capture what was left behind when these industries globalized and outsourced to places such as Northern Mexico and the east coast of China.

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David Worth's curator insight, October 2, 2014 2:46 PM
Really good set of images from a soon to be demolished power station.
patrimodus's curator insight, October 2, 2014 3:39 PM

belles photos rouillées

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Blue Gold : World Water Wars (Official Full Length Film)

Please visit http://www.bluegold-worldwaterwars.com and consider donating to the filmmaker if you enjoyed the film! There you can also link to vendors to buy...
Luke Walker's insight:
Luke Walker's insight:

This is the full documentary used in class. You may use this youtube link as a means of reviewing the film when working on your assignment from class.

Always remember, when quoting or paraphrasing other people's work be sure to give credit. 

Go to this link for more on MLA citations of films: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/09/

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Brandon Sherrill's comment, May 26, 2014 10:57 AM
Really? Water is everywhere instead of people fighting able I think we should come to together and find a cheap, effective way to purify salt water with the ice caps melting and turning into salt water I think we should be looking into ways to convert salt water to fresh water
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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is exactly what we talked about in class this week. The Aral Sea is a perfect example of how man-made structures such as dams can impact hydrology and create physical water scarcity in certain regions of the world.

The after effects on human healthy are terrible. 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:30 PM

Here is a question. Do you think perhaps in the future this could happen to lake Mead in Nevada/Arizona? With all the non-stop building and no rain perhaps one day could it run dry or do we have a way to stop it.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:17 PM

Once there is less water in a lake there is less water in the air therefore less rain. The long term consequences is that the fishing industry is destroyed where once upon a time there were 61000 workers and now there are under 2000. The water is more saltier. The lands are now ill suited and unbuildable. Also the people there are prone to health problems.

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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Luke Walker's insight:

Mind blowing and utterly ridiculous.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 AM

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. The National Post crunches the data
Luke Walker's insight:

This graphic gives a glimpse at how economic development affects human development of women in the world. It considers data of health, education etc.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Why focus on women?
2) Why measure these items? What have they got to do with “development”? Choose 1 and explain in detail.

 

3) Based on the information in this chart, what’s the connection between economic development and human development? Why do you suppose this connection exists? 

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Tinya Chang's comment, February 20, 2013 2:54 AM
1. Women take up half of the population.
2. From the data recorded in the category "expected number of years in school," we can see how educated most people in the country are. In order for countries to be able to provide education for their people, they need to develop education systems along with economic supports. Education can also help individuals develop skills that will strengthen the S.P.E.C. of the country.
3. Humans can only develop certain skills if they have financial support (education). An undeveloped human cannot contribute much to the economy. This connection exists because each development would not be possible without the other.
Powell Hung's comment, February 20, 2013 3:09 AM
1) This research focused on women because in many countries, male and female are not equal, so, they do this to show that which countries take women as important and which countries do not.
2) They measure this to see the birth rate in each countries, women who get education in each countries , and the importance of women in each countries. For example, by looking at the life expectancy at birth, you can know the birth rates in a certain country.
3) The connection between economic development and human development comes in many kinds. If there are developed people in a certain country, then the economy of the country might increase by their help. Then, because of the developed economy, many people can have a good education and also can have a job that can get a lot of money. This connection exits because many people that has a lot of wealth or people who are very developed are in the countries that are developed.
Ivy Buu's comment, February 20, 2013 3:57 AM
1) Women are the only sources to repopulate the earth. Without women, the world could not go on or develop.
2) The reason they measure these items is to compare countries and their level of development. According to the percentage of a country's TFR, we can tell how many women in that country are actually receiving the right education. For a country to be developed well, they all have to follow the order of SPEC. They have to have a good economy, government, connections, and national personality. For a country to have all of those things, their citizens have to receive proper education to help that country develop, including women.
3) For citizens to be able to develop, they have to receive proper education so they will be able to contribute to their country in the future. To receive good education, that country would have to be able to support their citizens enough so they could have a good living and learning environment. That is where a good economy counts. To have properly educated citizens, a country will need a financially supportive government. Without money and order, a country would not have the materials or necessities to educate their people. One cannot exist without the other.
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How the Experts Would Fix Cities

How the Experts Would Fix Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
More than 50 percent of the world's population now lives in urban areas.

 

 

Great way to compare your thoughts about how cities can and should be changed, and what the "experts" know about the necessity for urban geography change.


Via Alexandra Piggott
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TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow

TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Many cities are large; the rate at which these ten cities highlight a distinct spatial pattern and separate them from the rest. Which regions have the fastest growing cities? Which regions don't? Why geographic factor account for the rapid growth?

CITY                Increase by 2025

1.  Delhi          6.4 million

2.  Dhaka       6.3 m

3.  Kinshasa  6.3 m

4.  Mumbai   5.8 m

5.  Karachi    5.6 m

6.  Lagos        5.2 m

7.  Kolkata     4.6 m

8.  Shanghai  3.4 m

9.  Manila      3.3 m

10. Lahore     3.2 m

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


Via Seth Dixon
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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:40 PM

Unit 2

 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:54 PM

This video shows how the global population has changed throughout time. It illustrates how the population went on a massive incline, and based on the DTM, will soon go onto the decline as more countries become developed. 

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Bangladesh garment industry scrambles to save reputation after fires

Bangladesh garment industry scrambles to save reputation after fires | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Government promises action but labour groups say major retailers must invest in safety and clear up opaque supply chains. Syed Zain Al-Mahmood reports
Luke Walker's insight:

Are sweatshops a good thing or a bad thing?

Here's one viewpoint on a recent event unfolding in Bangladesh. 


https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzfRP9O-7j7EYTJqdHlpNF9wbGM/edit ;

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Labor standards help Cambodia keep customers - The New York Times

Luke Walker's insight:

A cool article on encouraging labor rights and sustainable industry in Cambodia.

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The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine

The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Price of Gold: In dollars and suffering, it's never been higher.
Luke Walker's insight:

An insightful article about the extraction of gold.

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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.
For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry.
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25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries

25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The real powerful states of the world.
Luke Walker's insight:

What if 25 US Mega Corporations were ranked against the GDP of countries?

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:57 PM

Great tool to show students how human use of natural resources can change landscapes and have permanent impacts on geographical landmarks such as the aerial sea. How do we stop it? Can we undo the damage done? How do we prevent these tragedies from happening in the future?

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About the IMF Overview

About the IMF Overview | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

 

  “The IMF works to foster global growth and economic stability. It provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.”

Learning what you have about the IMF, how it works, and its role in poor countries like Jamaica; what are your reactions to this mission statement? 

Reflect and explain in a short response (10 sentences min).

1 pt -- Response is given but is confusing or underdeveloped (<10 sentences)

2 pts -- complete response is given but it lacks original or creative contribution to the discussion (i.e. you are mostly repeating what others have said above your post)
3 pts -- response is insightful, shows you really understood and thought about the issue. You contribute an original thought that helps the online discussion develop positively.

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Jonathan Lai's comment, March 19, 2013 5:43 AM
The IMF was created to prevent or fix economic issues around the world to avoid another Great Depression like the one that was a big cause of WWII. I believe that if their written goals are not outright lies, then they are only following the word of those claims. If they actually were going to follow both the word and the soul of their claims, conditions in their loans would be somewhere from very little to none. The way it is being done now, countries that loan money, such as Jamaica, only benefit a little. Meanwhile, rich business people mostly from the West gain more money than they already have. Instead of assisting with the poverty countries have, those countries are going even more in debt as being unable to pay back the loans with interest, conditions that hurt their economies, and conditions that hurt their education. While is theory the IMF is an international cooperation, that cooperation's power lies only with a small group. And while the IMF says they promote stability, they do not mention where the economy will stabilize. At this point poor countries are very stably getting poorer and are quite stable in their poverty. And the "balance of payment" is very elaborately balanced towards the other side.
Ben's comment, March 19, 2013 6:59 AM
The IMF's supposedly purpose was to help countries that had economical problems such as Jamaica. As seen in Jamaica, it is really just a trap that helps no one else but the IMF itself. The IMF exploits the countries in need when the countries like Jamaica have no where else to go. The IMF then lends the country money but adding conditions that makes Jamaican and other countries have to compete with the rest of the world or closing down local farms and restaurants. It causes a chain reaction while the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. If the IMF doesn't really help the countries in need of economical help, the IMF should be abolished, for they are just famous frauds that make people believe the IMF can help you even though they just take advantage of you and leave you with less than when you started. They say they develop nations, but if you take a look at Jamaica, you can see that they are really doing the opposite. When they say they are reducing poverty, are they meaning they are increasing it, because they are just making people poorer and poorer. If they really want to help the countries, they should be giving out free money to help the countries in poverty, for they aren't doing what they say they are doing.
Emily Fang's comment, March 19, 2013 8:36 AM
I think the IMF was created purposely to earn money by saying they are helping the poor countries that are in need. They make a loan to a country that is undeveloped and gives so much conditions causing the poor countries unable to rise their economy but the IMF instead of giving them more time, they add interests that are unreasonable for a poor country to be able to pay back. The IMF, in my opinion, is just a corporation that is intended to take away all the money of the poor countries. They protect their name by saying they are to help the poor countries. If the IMF is really there to help the world economy rise, they should take off many of the conditions and decrease the interest rate. They should give the undeveloped countries the time to save their economy before they are asked to pay back the money.
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Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project

Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Very informational video on the subject of electronics and the need for more sustainable production of electronics.

How many cell phones have you had? What will you do when you replace it? Can it be recycled? Can we do better?

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American Human Development Project

American Human Development Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Measure of America is the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation.

 

The stated mission of the American Human Development Program is to provide easy-to-use yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well-being and opportunity in America and to stimulate fact-based dialogue about issues such as health, education and income.  This is another treasure trove of maps, charts, graphs, raw data all begging to be used as to enhance a student project.  This would be perfect to introduce after teaching about the Human Development Index.  


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an amazing tool that allows you to look at the human development index (HDI) across the United States by county, state, or major urban area. You can sort the data according to racial demographics as well. It's a powerful tool that helps to answer "What factors affect human development?"

Follow the link and then choose "Tools" and "Interactive Maps" to find the program.

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In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage

In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
NILOKHERI, India -- An ideal groom in this dusty farming village is a vegetarian, does not drink, has good prospects for a stable job and promises his bride-to-be an amenity in high demand: a toilet.

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) What can you learn about the local rural culture of India from this article?

2) What is the status of women in India? How is it changing?

EQ: How does popular culture (western toilets) influence and impact the local culture (Indian marriage doweries and women's rights) of India? 

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Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today

Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

This article links the growing global population with the rise of megacities in the developing world.  

 

The largest megacities are:

 1.  Tokyo            32.5 million    

2.  Seoul             20.6 m

3.  Mexico City  20.5 m

4.  New York     19.8 m

5.  Mumbai        19.2 m

6.  Jakarta          18.9 m

7.  Sao Paulo      18.8 m

8.  Delhi              18.6 m

9.  Shanghai       16.7 m

10. Manila          16.3 m


Via Seth Dixon
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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


Via Seth Dixon
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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.