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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
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About the IMF Overview

About the IMF Overview | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

 

  “The IMF works to foster global growth and economic stability. It provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.”

Learning what you have about the IMF, how it works, and its role in poor countries like Jamaica; what are your reactions to this mission statement? 

Reflect and explain in a short response (10 sentences min).

1 pt -- Response is given but is confusing or underdeveloped (<10 sentences)

2 pts -- complete response is given but it lacks original or creative contribution to the discussion (i.e. you are mostly repeating what others have said above your post)
3 pts -- response is insightful, shows you really understood and thought about the issue. You contribute an original thought that helps the online discussion develop positively.

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Jonathan Lai's comment, March 19, 2013 5:43 AM
The IMF was created to prevent or fix economic issues around the world to avoid another Great Depression like the one that was a big cause of WWII. I believe that if their written goals are not outright lies, then they are only following the word of those claims. If they actually were going to follow both the word and the soul of their claims, conditions in their loans would be somewhere from very little to none. The way it is being done now, countries that loan money, such as Jamaica, only benefit a little. Meanwhile, rich business people mostly from the West gain more money than they already have. Instead of assisting with the poverty countries have, those countries are going even more in debt as being unable to pay back the loans with interest, conditions that hurt their economies, and conditions that hurt their education. While is theory the IMF is an international cooperation, that cooperation's power lies only with a small group. And while the IMF says they promote stability, they do not mention where the economy will stabilize. At this point poor countries are very stably getting poorer and are quite stable in their poverty. And the "balance of payment" is very elaborately balanced towards the other side.
Ben's comment, March 19, 2013 6:59 AM
The IMF's supposedly purpose was to help countries that had economical problems such as Jamaica. As seen in Jamaica, it is really just a trap that helps no one else but the IMF itself. The IMF exploits the countries in need when the countries like Jamaica have no where else to go. The IMF then lends the country money but adding conditions that makes Jamaican and other countries have to compete with the rest of the world or closing down local farms and restaurants. It causes a chain reaction while the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. If the IMF doesn't really help the countries in need of economical help, the IMF should be abolished, for they are just famous frauds that make people believe the IMF can help you even though they just take advantage of you and leave you with less than when you started. They say they develop nations, but if you take a look at Jamaica, you can see that they are really doing the opposite. When they say they are reducing poverty, are they meaning they are increasing it, because they are just making people poorer and poorer. If they really want to help the countries, they should be giving out free money to help the countries in poverty, for they aren't doing what they say they are doing.
Emily Fang's comment, March 19, 2013 8:36 AM
I think the IMF was created purposely to earn money by saying they are helping the poor countries that are in need. They make a loan to a country that is undeveloped and gives so much conditions causing the poor countries unable to rise their economy but the IMF instead of giving them more time, they add interests that are unreasonable for a poor country to be able to pay back. The IMF, in my opinion, is just a corporation that is intended to take away all the money of the poor countries. They protect their name by saying they are to help the poor countries. If the IMF is really there to help the world economy rise, they should take off many of the conditions and decrease the interest rate. They should give the undeveloped countries the time to save their economy before they are asked to pay back the money.
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Electronic Wasteland

Electronic Wasteland | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Photographer Pieter Hugo documents the Agbogbloshie slum.
Luke Walker's insight:

This photo gallery of images from the electronics dumps in Ghana. The developed world produces an enormous amount of electronic waste that cannot be recycled given that many of the materials used to produce computers, cell phones, etc. are highyl toxic. Local people search through the dump, to retrieve precious metals and components from the wasted electronics. The remainder is burned releasing toxins into the air.

Questions to Ponder:

How can computers be redesigned to avoid this problem?

How can governments react to this situation to stop the export of electronic waste to places like Africa, China, etc.?
How can electronic manufacturers be held more accountable for the quality of their products? 

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Luke Walker's comment, February 22, 2013 12:42 AM
Check out this related NYTimes article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/24/technology/24junk.html?_r=0
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American Human Development Project

American Human Development Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Measure of America is the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation.

 

The stated mission of the American Human Development Program is to provide easy-to-use yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well-being and opportunity in America and to stimulate fact-based dialogue about issues such as health, education and income.  This is another treasure trove of maps, charts, graphs, raw data all begging to be used as to enhance a student project.  This would be perfect to introduce after teaching about the Human Development Index.  


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an amazing tool that allows you to look at the human development index (HDI) across the United States by county, state, or major urban area. You can sort the data according to racial demographics as well. It's a powerful tool that helps to answer "What factors affect human development?"

Follow the link and then choose "Tools" and "Interactive Maps" to find the program.

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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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How long does it take to earn a Big Mac?

How long does it take to earn a Big Mac? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
THE size of your pay packet may be important, but so is its purchasing power. Helpfully, a UBS report published this week offers a handy guide to how long it takes a...

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) How does this define the status of the West vs. the Rest?

2) How can this help you to better understand the lives of people living in the West vs the Rest?

3) How much has the Big Mac globalized?

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The world's most expensive cities - Telegraph

The world's most expensive cities - Telegraph | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
New research has named the Norwegian capital as the world's costliest city, with London in 10th.See it on Scoop.it, via Geography - The World Around Us...

Notice a regional pattern here? Think West vs the Rest?
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The Global Scale of Migrant Money Flows - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com

A new study suggests that 1 in 10 people on the planet directly benefit from money sent home by migrants working in other countries. Here are figures detailing that money's impact on developing nations in 2006.

 

Excellent map that details global money flows, i.e. the migration of money. Remittances is a key issue in the global economy and a great statement about the relationship that exists between the "west" and the "rest"

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Watch Last Train Home on PBS. See more from POV.
Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world’s largest human migration.

 

 

Really depressing, but really awesome documentary about Chinese New Year. Gives students a lot of deepened understanding regarding economic development, migration, mainland China, etc.

 

Here's a film question handout:

 

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8bz0dgds0QLakNKZjhxbGJZTms

 

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Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project

Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Very informational video on the subject of electronics and the need for more sustainable production of electronics.

How many cell phones have you had? What will you do when you replace it? Can it be recycled? Can we do better?

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A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. The National Post crunches the data
Luke Walker's insight:

This graphic gives a glimpse at how economic development affects human development of women in the world. It considers data of health, education etc.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Why focus on women?
2) Why measure these items? What have they got to do with “development”? Choose 1 and explain in detail.

 

3) Based on the information in this chart, what’s the connection between economic development and human development? Why do you suppose this connection exists? 

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Tinya Chang's comment, February 20, 2013 2:54 AM
1. Women take up half of the population.
2. From the data recorded in the category "expected number of years in school," we can see how educated most people in the country are. In order for countries to be able to provide education for their people, they need to develop education systems along with economic supports. Education can also help individuals develop skills that will strengthen the S.P.E.C. of the country.
3. Humans can only develop certain skills if they have financial support (education). An undeveloped human cannot contribute much to the economy. This connection exists because each development would not be possible without the other.
Powell Hung's comment, February 20, 2013 3:09 AM
1) This research focused on women because in many countries, male and female are not equal, so, they do this to show that which countries take women as important and which countries do not.
2) They measure this to see the birth rate in each countries, women who get education in each countries , and the importance of women in each countries. For example, by looking at the life expectancy at birth, you can know the birth rates in a certain country.
3) The connection between economic development and human development comes in many kinds. If there are developed people in a certain country, then the economy of the country might increase by their help. Then, because of the developed economy, many people can have a good education and also can have a job that can get a lot of money. This connection exits because many people that has a lot of wealth or people who are very developed are in the countries that are developed.
Ivy Buu's comment, February 20, 2013 3:57 AM
1) Women are the only sources to repopulate the earth. Without women, the world could not go on or develop.
2) The reason they measure these items is to compare countries and their level of development. According to the percentage of a country's TFR, we can tell how many women in that country are actually receiving the right education. For a country to be developed well, they all have to follow the order of SPEC. They have to have a good economy, government, connections, and national personality. For a country to have all of those things, their citizens have to receive proper education to help that country develop, including women.
3) For citizens to be able to develop, they have to receive proper education so they will be able to contribute to their country in the future. To receive good education, that country would have to be able to support their citizens enough so they could have a good living and learning environment. That is where a good economy counts. To have properly educated citizens, a country will need a financially supportive government. Without money and order, a country would not have the materials or necessities to educate their people. One cannot exist without the other.
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Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today

Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

This article links the growing global population with the rise of megacities in the developing world.  

 

The largest megacities are:

 1.  Tokyo            32.5 million    

2.  Seoul             20.6 m

3.  Mexico City  20.5 m

4.  New York     19.8 m

5.  Mumbai        19.2 m

6.  Jakarta          18.9 m

7.  Sao Paulo      18.8 m

8.  Delhi              18.6 m

9.  Shanghai       16.7 m

10. Manila          16.3 m


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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Great visuals on the status of women in the world.

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