Walkerteach Geo
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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:14 PM

In Japanese culture older generation are taken care of by their decedents. With more and more people not having children it is going at odds with long standing cultural traditions. What will happen when these people are no longer able to take care of themselves and have no one to turn to for assistance. Japan will  have to adapt and consider solutions that go against their norms regarding familial structure.

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:40 PM

Unit 2

 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:54 PM

This video shows how the global population has changed throughout time. It illustrates how the population went on a massive incline, and based on the DTM, will soon go onto the decline as more countries become developed. 

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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.

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China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population)

China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy? 

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How long does it take to earn a Big Mac?

How long does it take to earn a Big Mac? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
THE size of your pay packet may be important, but so is its purchasing power. Helpfully, a UBS report published this week offers a handy guide to how long it takes a...

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) How does this define the status of the West vs. the Rest?

2) How can this help you to better understand the lives of people living in the West vs the Rest?

3) How much has the Big Mac globalized?

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Iran's news agency portrays satirical Onion story as its own

Iran's news agency portrays satirical Onion story as its own | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Add Iran's news agency to the long list of those hoodwinked by the satire of The Onion.

 

This just kills me.  It is another reminder to ALWAYS CHECK THE VALIDITY OF YOUR SOURCES, especially when they are coming from halfway across the globe. 

 


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Steven Leu's comment, October 24, 2012 7:32 AM
This has got to be the funniest thing I've seen all week. Kind of reminds me of an epic fail I heard of a while ago (BBC, you're supposed to be looking for the United Nations Security Council, not the United Nations Space Command from the Halo games! /facepalm).
Luke Walker's comment, October 24, 2012 11:37 AM
That's hilarious!
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Gangnam Style: Three Reasons K-Pop Is Taking Over The World : NPR

The viral hit isn't a fluke. South Korea has been cultivating a global music business for decades.

Check out the underlying economics of the success story that is Gangnam Style. Listen and better understand how a Korean phenomena can take off on a global scale. 

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Bushmen of the Kalahari

A photograph of man, as he existed 50,000 years ago. That is how long the Bushmen, the most ancient people of southern Africa, have lived in the Kalahari Des...

 

A youtube video of the Kalahari Bushmen who live in subsaharan Africa. Check out this interesting culture that has remained relatively unchanged for the past several thousand years. This is a good idea of hunting and gathering, how people existed prior to agriculture.

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Carolina Camera: The Sling Shot Man

"This is the story of a man who makes sling shots and shoots them like an expert marksman."  I love showing this clip--this man is the embodiment of folk culture and his story shows the elements that differentiate folk culture from popular culture. 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:19 PM

It is amazing how someone could be that good in shooting with a sling shot. He can use those skills to his advantage when it comes down to defending himself. But it is also incredible how he used it to get food when he was much younger. It must have been difficult for him to survive when he was younger but that entire struggle helped him become the person he is today.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:23 PM

unit 3- Folk culture!

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:27 PM

This video shows how people can grow and develop in response to their environment and their disconnectedness to modern, popular culture. This man lives for all intents and purposed, in the middle of nowhere. Growing up with few people living around him and little to do, he was forced to make up his own methods of play. He developed slingshots as a form of play, which then turned into a beneficial skill in terms of getting rid of pests. Without these specific geographical conditions, could it have been possible for him to develop this strange skill? 

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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

NYTimes video: "Skateistan" | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:33 AM

Who could have imagined, that Skateboards could be used as a geopolitical tool? Over a decade ago, the United States invaded Afghanistan with the aim of rooting out and destroying the terrorist who attacked the nation on 911. As with most of our military campaigns in the Middle East, the mission quickly became bogged down in a nation building campaign. The people of Afghanistan have long been wary of foreign influence. Empire after empire has attempted to conquer this nation, only to suffer humiliating defeats. For any chance at sustained success, the United States must win over the hearts and minds of the Afghan people. This skateboard program is a perfect tool in accomplishing that objective. The parks bring all types of youths together in the spirit of fun. They are a unifying factor amongst the youth in Afghanistan.

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Video: "EAT" by Rick Mereki

Foods from around the world...This is a playful video clip that leads students to have more questions than answers about different places.  The spirit of exploration and experimentation is at the heart of this global traveler's montage of delightful dishes.  Watching this encourages viewers to open their minds to new ideas, cultures and places. 


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:58 PM

Watching this video made me hungry hahaha. This video is a good example of why we should try different food. Living in the united state has giving me the opportunity to learn about different culture. I feel that  if we try different food we are not only becoming less judgmental but we are also contributing economically. We don’t have to go to Italy to enjoy a great pizza. We can go stay here and spend our money here. At the long run it will help our economy to grow more efficiently. Made In America!!!

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:48 AM

This is an interesting video because some people are extremely particular with what they eat. I like this video because it makes the viewers of the video wonder what they actually could be missing out on with all of the wonderful food they could be consuming. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:55 PM

Even though this video barely had any words it still said a lot. It showed so many different foods from so many different places. It was pretty awesome to see the different foods that different cultures put together. One thing that I thought was funny was when the guy was eating the candy apple with popcorn attatched to it. I've had a candy apple and I've had popcorn, but never together. It would be intersting to know what country that was from. Also another thing that really cuaght my eye in the video was when the guy ate the cricket! What country eats crickets as part of their meal? That is so crazy. Meals really do tell a lot about the culture of a particular place. It is amazing to me that just from a simple dish you can learn so much about a countries culture. The first thing I always do when I go somewhere new is try the food. I have to say I loved Italy!

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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.

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Do the dead outnumber the living?

Do the dead outnumber the living? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The population of the planet reached seven billion in October last year, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us?

Simple answer, no.  But did it make you think?


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 6, 2012 8:52 PM
Very short answer: no. Yet, how many people have lived in human history? What are the estimates? This article is worth exploring to not at other population issues and debates.
Em Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:09 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
melissa Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:10 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
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China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


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Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 9, 2014 6:15 PM

The population in China is still exceeding in spite of the safety regulations that they've set to limit their population growth. With their population being 20% of the worlds population China is the most populous country in the world. One in five people is a resident of China, but with recent studies statistics show that by 2040 India will exceed 1.52 billion. ~R.J~

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:26 AM

We constantly talk about the one child policy - this is also another near future concern in China.  

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Local Life Expectancies (Population)

Local Life Expectancies (Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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Map: What if the largest countries had the biggest populations?

Map: What if the largest countries had the biggest populations? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

An interesting perspective on the world map. Interesting things to make note of:

1) The US, Brazil, Yemen, Ireland don't move.

2) North and South Korea are still next to one another.

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

Why do some countries move and others don't?

What does this tell you about the population sizes of the "West" vs. the "Rest"?

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Tim Wang's comment, October 26, 2012 10:28 AM
I think it is a pretty good idea, that not all the poor countries are squashed together. That somehow some of the rich countries that have big population can live beside the poor. They can help each other. The west needs labor, the rest needs money.
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Mustafa Topaloğlu Obama şarkısı Video Klip

mustafa topaloğlu obama, mustafa topaloğlu obama şarkısı, mustafa topaloğlu obama video, mustafa topaloğlu obama klip, mustafa topaloğlu obama şarkısı dinle...

 

This music video came out shortly after the election of President Barack Obama. It's performed by a Turkish sing by the name of Mustafa Topaloğlu. I find this video interesting because it shows a global reaction to Obama's wave of "yes we can", "hope" and "change" ideas from his election. It's also interesting from the standpoint of Turkey as a MidEast country discussing a desire for world peace.

I'm also grealty amused by the different cultural ideas represented in the video, Turkish and English language, the rap and hip-hop influences at the end. Western musical styles meets Turkish vocals.

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MOVE

3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage...
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Muslim Roots, U.S. Blues

Muslim Roots, U.S. Blues | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Thirty percent: That’s how many of the 10 million West Africans brought to the Americas as slaves may have been Muslims, according to a growing body of research.

 

Really cool write up about the history of Islam in American history and culture. Definitely check out the Muslim call to prayer (Athaan) vs. Levee Camp Holler to see the cultural influence.

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

 Looking for an easy online method of sharing and using powerpoint presentations?  Slideshare is made just for that.  Here is one I made of Middle Eastern flags a while back, showing the cultural patterns and similarities among the flags.  Students are quick to note that the Israeli flag sticks out and "doesn't fit in well visually."  


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

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"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage." 

This video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world.   Geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures and other ways of doing things.  In a three part series including 'Eat' and 'Move.' 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.