Walkerteach Geo
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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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High Plains Aquifer Dwindles, Hurting Farmers

High Plains Aquifer Dwindles, Hurting Farmers | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Parts of the vast High Plains Aquifer, once a prodigious source of water, are now so low that crops can’t be watered and bridges span arid stream beds.
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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is exactly what we talked about in class this week. The Aral Sea is a perfect example of how man-made structures such as dams can impact hydrology and create physical water scarcity in certain regions of the world.

The after effects on human healthy are terrible. 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:30 PM

Here is a question. Do you think perhaps in the future this could happen to lake Mead in Nevada/Arizona? With all the non-stop building and no rain perhaps one day could it run dry or do we have a way to stop it.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:17 PM

Once there is less water in a lake there is less water in the air therefore less rain. The long term consequences is that the fishing industry is destroyed where once upon a time there were 61000 workers and now there are under 2000. The water is more saltier. The lands are now ill suited and unbuildable. Also the people there are prone to health problems.

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Save The Colorado

Luke Walker's insight:

A nonprofit organization that provides charts and info about the uses of the COlorado River, the ongoing drought in the American Southwest, and what could accur in the region in the near future if conservation doesn't succeed.

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Colorado Division of Water Resources: Water Rights

Colorado Division of Water Resources: Water Rights | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Excellent resource for info on the Colorado River Basin

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The Crazy Amount Of Sugar Hiding In Random Foods

How much sugar is really in your food? Sure there's a lot of sugar in Coke, but baked beans?? Also, "healthy" cereal has more sugar than Fruit Loops. Check o...
Luke Walker's insight:

What's the most common ingredient across all of these products?

Think about it...where does that sugar come from? 

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What 2000 Calories Looks Like

Here's what your daily allowance actually looks like. Inspired by this post: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-200-calories-look-like.htm Check out more vide...
Luke Walker's insight:

An expansion on what 200 calories looks like. Pay attention to the comparisons, 1 large fry at McDonald's = how many chicken nuggets?

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning : NPR

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning : NPR | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
Luke Walker's insight:

A really cool report on how different cultures tackle the subject of learning in a classroom.

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Seth Dixon's comment, March 20, 2013 2:16 PM
Thanks for suggesting this...it's actually made me do a lot of thinking.
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Ziggy Marley G7

Ziggy Marley G7
Luke Walker's insight:

Another song about the role of globalization and capitalism in the Caribbean.

Today it's not the G7, but rather the G8.

 

 

 

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BBC - Religion: Rastafari

BBC - Religion: Rastafari | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Guide to Rastafari, including its origins in 1930s Jamaica, beliefs about God and Africa, rituals and music.
Luke Walker's insight:

Understanding this religion from Jamaica may give a bit more perspective on the people of Jamaica and their view of the world.

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Cassidy Heckel's comment, March 14, 2013 10:17 AM
I love this link because it has many views on the Rastafari religion.
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MDG MONITOR :: Tracking the Millennium Development Goals

MDG MONITOR :: Tracking the Millennium Development Goals | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Track the progress of the Millennium Development Goals (set for 2015) here at this website.

Click on "browse by goal" to track by each of the 8 goals.

Click on "browse by location" to track the progress of over 130 locations worldwide. 

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A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. The National Post crunches the data
Luke Walker's insight:

This graphic gives a glimpse at how economic development affects human development of women in the world. It considers data of health, education etc.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Why focus on women?
2) Why measure these items? What have they got to do with “development”? Choose 1 and explain in detail.

 

3) Based on the information in this chart, what’s the connection between economic development and human development? Why do you suppose this connection exists? 

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Tinya Chang's comment, February 20, 2013 2:54 AM
1. Women take up half of the population.
2. From the data recorded in the category "expected number of years in school," we can see how educated most people in the country are. In order for countries to be able to provide education for their people, they need to develop education systems along with economic supports. Education can also help individuals develop skills that will strengthen the S.P.E.C. of the country.
3. Humans can only develop certain skills if they have financial support (education). An undeveloped human cannot contribute much to the economy. This connection exists because each development would not be possible without the other.
Powell Hung's comment, February 20, 2013 3:09 AM
1) This research focused on women because in many countries, male and female are not equal, so, they do this to show that which countries take women as important and which countries do not.
2) They measure this to see the birth rate in each countries, women who get education in each countries , and the importance of women in each countries. For example, by looking at the life expectancy at birth, you can know the birth rates in a certain country.
3) The connection between economic development and human development comes in many kinds. If there are developed people in a certain country, then the economy of the country might increase by their help. Then, because of the developed economy, many people can have a good education and also can have a job that can get a lot of money. This connection exits because many people that has a lot of wealth or people who are very developed are in the countries that are developed.
Ivy Buu's comment, February 20, 2013 3:57 AM
1) Women are the only sources to repopulate the earth. Without women, the world could not go on or develop.
2) The reason they measure these items is to compare countries and their level of development. According to the percentage of a country's TFR, we can tell how many women in that country are actually receiving the right education. For a country to be developed well, they all have to follow the order of SPEC. They have to have a good economy, government, connections, and national personality. For a country to have all of those things, their citizens have to receive proper education to help that country develop, including women.
3) For citizens to be able to develop, they have to receive proper education so they will be able to contribute to their country in the future. To receive good education, that country would have to be able to support their citizens enough so they could have a good living and learning environment. That is where a good economy counts. To have properly educated citizens, a country will need a financially supportive government. Without money and order, a country would not have the materials or necessities to educate their people. One cannot exist without the other.
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Iran Raises Level of Islamic Law Enforcement

Iran Raises Level of Islamic Law Enforcement | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
A new directive prohibits all aircraft from flying across Iran during the call-to-prayer ritual, which is observed five times a day.
Luke Walker's insight:

A really interesting example of political Islam at work in the government regulated airline industry of Iran.

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The Dublin Statement on Water and Sustainable Development - UN Documents

The Dublin Statement on Water and Sustainable Development - UN Documents | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Dublin Statement on Water and Sustainable Development - an element of the body of UN Documents for earth stewardship and international decades for a culture of peace and non-violence for the children of the world...
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Check out this collection of satelite quality slider maps to see the impact of humans on the physical landscape worldwide.

With particular interest to water, the first map shown is the Aral Sea in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

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Chasing Water -- Doc. on Colorado River Basin

Photojournalist Pete McBride asks: Is the Colorado River more than just the plumbing for our western states? He journeys from the river-irrigated fields of h...
Luke Walker's insight:

Check out this 18 minute film made by one photojournalist following the Colorado River from start to finish.

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Colorado River Map -- National Geographic

Colorado River Map -- National Geographic | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Explore an interactive map of Colorado River diversions, dams, ecosystems, stories, pictures, video, and more
Luke Walker's insight:

This website is interactive and allows one to examine the river under differing amounts of precipitation, and learn more about diversions, dams and species associated with the river.

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Video: A Chinese Threat to Afghan Buddhas

Video: A Chinese Threat to Afghan Buddhas | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
In Afghanistan, a Chinese mining company threatens to destroy the remains of an ancient Buddhist city, which archaeologists are now racing to excavate.
Luke Walker's insight:

Much to discuss and consider here, culture, human-environment interaction, geopolitics.

It's really sad that a 2,000 year old site will be destroyed because of minority interests and greed.

I wonder how the millions of Buddhists in China would feel if they knew about this? 

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How Much Food Can You Buy For $5 Around The World?

Here's how much coffee, meat, beer, McDonald's, and more you can buy for $5 in countries around the world. For starters, you can buy a lot of beer for $5 in ...
Luke Walker's insight:

How do the amount of resources available in each country affect price and quantity of these items?
How do the core countries compare to one another?

How do the core countries compare to the periphery?

How do subsidies affect the price and quantity of various items?



It's ideas like these that go back into explaining what $5 will buy you globally.

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What Does 200 Calories Look Like?

What Does 200 Calories Look Like? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Brief and Straightforward Guide: What Does 200 Calories Look Like?
Luke Walker's insight:

An interesting look at what 200 calories looks like. Keep in mind the suggested diet is 2000 calories a day. But not all food calories are created equal. Some items are low calories and very healthy, some are high calories and have very few nutritious things to offer.

For example, compare how much broccoli you could eat vs. how much of a McDonald's cheese burger you could eat?

Guess what, the broccoli is more food, and more nutrients!

This is literally FOOD FOR THOUGHT people :-) 

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About the IMF Overview

About the IMF Overview | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

 

  “The IMF works to foster global growth and economic stability. It provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.”

Learning what you have about the IMF, how it works, and its role in poor countries like Jamaica; what are your reactions to this mission statement? 

Reflect and explain in a short response (10 sentences min).

1 pt -- Response is given but is confusing or underdeveloped (<10 sentences)

2 pts -- complete response is given but it lacks original or creative contribution to the discussion (i.e. you are mostly repeating what others have said above your post)
3 pts -- response is insightful, shows you really understood and thought about the issue. You contribute an original thought that helps the online discussion develop positively.

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Jonathan Lai's comment, March 19, 2013 5:43 AM
The IMF was created to prevent or fix economic issues around the world to avoid another Great Depression like the one that was a big cause of WWII. I believe that if their written goals are not outright lies, then they are only following the word of those claims. If they actually were going to follow both the word and the soul of their claims, conditions in their loans would be somewhere from very little to none. The way it is being done now, countries that loan money, such as Jamaica, only benefit a little. Meanwhile, rich business people mostly from the West gain more money than they already have. Instead of assisting with the poverty countries have, those countries are going even more in debt as being unable to pay back the loans with interest, conditions that hurt their economies, and conditions that hurt their education. While is theory the IMF is an international cooperation, that cooperation's power lies only with a small group. And while the IMF says they promote stability, they do not mention where the economy will stabilize. At this point poor countries are very stably getting poorer and are quite stable in their poverty. And the "balance of payment" is very elaborately balanced towards the other side.
Ben's comment, March 19, 2013 6:59 AM
The IMF's supposedly purpose was to help countries that had economical problems such as Jamaica. As seen in Jamaica, it is really just a trap that helps no one else but the IMF itself. The IMF exploits the countries in need when the countries like Jamaica have no where else to go. The IMF then lends the country money but adding conditions that makes Jamaican and other countries have to compete with the rest of the world or closing down local farms and restaurants. It causes a chain reaction while the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. If the IMF doesn't really help the countries in need of economical help, the IMF should be abolished, for they are just famous frauds that make people believe the IMF can help you even though they just take advantage of you and leave you with less than when you started. They say they develop nations, but if you take a look at Jamaica, you can see that they are really doing the opposite. When they say they are reducing poverty, are they meaning they are increasing it, because they are just making people poorer and poorer. If they really want to help the countries, they should be giving out free money to help the countries in poverty, for they aren't doing what they say they are doing.
Emily Fang's comment, March 19, 2013 8:36 AM
I think the IMF was created purposely to earn money by saying they are helping the poor countries that are in need. They make a loan to a country that is undeveloped and gives so much conditions causing the poor countries unable to rise their economy but the IMF instead of giving them more time, they add interests that are unreasonable for a poor country to be able to pay back. The IMF, in my opinion, is just a corporation that is intended to take away all the money of the poor countries. They protect their name by saying they are to help the poor countries. If the IMF is really there to help the world economy rise, they should take off many of the conditions and decrease the interest rate. They should give the undeveloped countries the time to save their economy before they are asked to pay back the money.
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UN Millennium Development Goals

UN Millennium Development Goals | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

Luke Walker's insight:

The United Nations issued 8 goals for improving the developing world. These goals were issued in 2000 and set with a time period of 15 years to be met. Check out each of the goals listed on the right hand side. Click on each to find quick fact sheets, reports, linked stories etc.

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Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project

Story of Electronics « The Story of Stuff Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Very informational video on the subject of electronics and the need for more sustainable production of electronics.

How many cell phones have you had? What will you do when you replace it? Can it be recycled? Can we do better?

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American Human Development Project

American Human Development Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Measure of America is the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation.

 

The stated mission of the American Human Development Program is to provide easy-to-use yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well-being and opportunity in America and to stimulate fact-based dialogue about issues such as health, education and income.  This is another treasure trove of maps, charts, graphs, raw data all begging to be used as to enhance a student project.  This would be perfect to introduce after teaching about the Human Development Index.  


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an amazing tool that allows you to look at the human development index (HDI) across the United States by county, state, or major urban area. You can sort the data according to racial demographics as well. It's a powerful tool that helps to answer "What factors affect human development?"

Follow the link and then choose "Tools" and "Interactive Maps" to find the program.

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