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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 10:16 AM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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Strange McDonald's Menu Items Around the World

At Travora, we love to travel, and our blog features the latest in travel news, hotel and restaurant reviews, videos and some of the best travel photography on the net.

 

 

A pretty extensive collection of stimulus diffusion items at McDonald's. This was found by one of my students.

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Ismail-Yk Facebook-2010

Ever wonder what a Turkish love song sounds like? Ever wonder what a Turkish love song about finding love on Facebook sounds like? Well WONDER NO MORE!

This is a great music video. I find it relates pretty well to notions of technology, communication and a globalized culture of social media:

Be sure to stick around for the ridiculous end of the world dance routine.

 

Here are the lyrics very roughly translated. I must admit I'm only a novice with my Turkish so I had to employ google translate for the rest.

I went to the internet cafe
I went to Facebook
I gave my name as a crazy
Now I've been a member (im im)
I met with one of the beautiful
Writing in day to day
Ointment is günlüme
Now I've been loving
But I love the price
Her eyes were very beautiful
It's a pretty hard to find
Everyone asks where did you get
I've been looking every day on facebook Facebook
From there I found this girl on facebook Facebook
As soon as hired facebook Facebook
I think I'm in love with Facebook Facebook
locomotive Gülşen
Citi Piti birsen
Oh, I promise you
Gimcrack marbling
Brown banu
Tanışabilsen
Beauties beautiful like this
what you want
According to everyone's tastes on Facebook
handsome erkan
charismatic serkan
Souls burning, sympathetic ercan
Crazy Ayhan, face, fan
Whether friend, whether you're new love
I've already found my love on facebook
I've been looking every day on facebook Facebook
From there I found this girl on facebook Facebook
As soon as hired facebook Facebook
I think I'm in love with Facebook Facebook

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Gangnam Style, Dissected: The Subversive Message Within South Korea's Music Video Sensation

Gangnam Style, Dissected: The Subversive Message Within South Korea's Music Video Sensation | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Beneath the catchy dance beat and hilarious scenes of Seoul's poshest neighborhood, there might be a subtle message about wealth, class, and value in South Korean society.

 

This is a pretty insightful cultural analysis of the sensation. 


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Medina: Saudis take a bulldozer to Islam's history

Medina: Saudis take a bulldozer to Islam's history | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Three of the world’s oldest mosques are about to be destroyed as Saudi Arabia embarks on a multi-billion-pound expansion of Islam’s second holiest site.

 

 

A changing cultural landscape with changing times. An interesting look at Mecca's development.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:21 AM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 8:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today

Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

This article links the growing global population with the rise of megacities in the developing world.  

 

The largest megacities are:

 1.  Tokyo            32.5 million    

2.  Seoul             20.6 m

3.  Mexico City  20.5 m

4.  New York     19.8 m

5.  Mumbai        19.2 m

6.  Jakarta          18.9 m

7.  Sao Paulo      18.8 m

8.  Delhi              18.6 m

9.  Shanghai       16.7 m

10. Manila          16.3 m


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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Do the dead outnumber the living?

Do the dead outnumber the living? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The population of the planet reached seven billion in October last year, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us?

Simple answer, no.  But did it make you think?


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 6, 2012 5:52 PM
Very short answer: no. Yet, how many people have lived in human history? What are the estimates? This article is worth exploring to not at other population issues and debates.
Em Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 8:09 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
melissa Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 8:10 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
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China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


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Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 2:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

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Local Life Expectancies (Population)

Local Life Expectancies (Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 7:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 10:59 AM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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World Systems Theory Map (Core-Semi-Periphery Model)

World Systems Theory Map (Core-Semi-Periphery Model) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

See the visual breakdown of "the west vs the rest"

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How the Experts Would Fix Cities

How the Experts Would Fix Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
More than 50 percent of the world's population now lives in urban areas.

 

 

Great way to compare your thoughts about how cities can and should be changed, and what the "experts" know about the necessity for urban geography change.


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Exotic McDonald's Menu Selections From Around the World

Exotic McDonald's Menu Selections From Around the World | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Exotic and McDonald's don't really belong in the same sentence, do they? Words more commonly associated with the burger giant tend to be "obesity" and "suburbia," unless, of course, you hit the road.

Check out the rampant stimulus diffusion by McDonald's around the world.

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In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage

In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
NILOKHERI, India -- An ideal groom in this dusty farming village is a vegetarian, does not drink, has good prospects for a stable job and promises his bride-to-be an amenity in high demand: a toilet.

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) What can you learn about the local rural culture of India from this article?

2) What is the status of women in India? How is it changing?

EQ: How does popular culture (western toilets) influence and impact the local culture (Indian marriage doweries and women's rights) of India? 

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TED Blog | Dennis Hong debuts a robot that dances to “Gangnam Style”

TED Blog | Dennis Hong debuts a robot that dances to “Gangnam Style” | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading -- through TED.com, our annual conferences, the annual TED Prize and local TEDx events.

 

It was bound to spread to robots eventually...

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 10:51 AM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow

TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Many cities are large; the rate at which these ten cities highlight a distinct spatial pattern and separate them from the rest. Which regions have the fastest growing cities? Which regions don't? Why geographic factor account for the rapid growth?

CITY                Increase by 2025

1.  Delhi          6.4 million

2.  Dhaka       6.3 m

3.  Kinshasa  6.3 m

4.  Mumbai   5.8 m

5.  Karachi    5.6 m

6.  Lagos        5.2 m

7.  Kolkata     4.6 m

8.  Shanghai  3.4 m

9.  Manila      3.3 m

10. Lahore     3.2 m

 


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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:26 PM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 9:52 PM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population)

China's One-Child Policy (Government and Population) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 8:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:26 AM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.