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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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Intro Animation - Core/Periphery Theory

A quick animated intro video I created to give students a crash course on Core/Periphery Theory. From here the lecture will largely be inquiry based with tea...
Luke Walker's insight:

Check out this awesome core-periphery model video.

Make a 3 Column Chart in your notes, record qualities of the Core,  Periphery, and semi-periphery.

 

Below the chart, write 3-5 sentences documenting the connection and interaction between the 3 regions.

By the way, what kind of region are the core, periphery and semiperiphery? 

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The Burgess and Hoyt Model

The Burgess and Hoyt Model | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use – eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors.

 

A useful source for learning about city zone models and urban geography.

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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:01 PM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.