Walkerteach Geo
Follow
Find tag "migration"
4.5K views | +0 today
Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

How do you decide where to go in a zombie apocalypse? - David Hunter - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-do-you-decide-where-to-go-in-a-zombie-apocalypse-david-hunter Can geography save your life in case of, say, a...
Luke Walker's insight:

1) What are push and pull factors where you live?

2) What are reasons for human migration?

3) Why would we analyze the connection between 2 locations even wen there isn't a zombie outbreak?

4) How would you analyze movement to determine where to put a new sports stadium? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

How To Survive a Zombie Attack on Campus

How To Survive a Zombie Attack on Campus | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Luke Walker's insight:

Here's a really fantastic resource for understanding the imminent Zombie Apocalypse.

As you read through this resource think about how this might affect your plans for migrating through and surviving the Zombie Apocalypse.

GOOD LUCK! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

My wish: Manufactured landscapes and green education

My wish: Manufactured landscapes and green education | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Accepting his 2005 TED Prize, photographer Edward Burtynsky makes a wish: that his images -- stunning landscapes that document humanity's impact on the world -- help persuade millions to join a global conversation on sustainability.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall

America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The coal economy in Central Appalachia is in an unprecedented freefall. Which isn't making it easier for workers to move on.

Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

This is relevant to early posts about coalfields in West Virginia.

more...
Nick Smith's curator insight, September 9, 2014 12:24 PM

This effects the eastern part of our state and our country overall. The fall of the coal field is hurting our economy.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 5:58 PM

(North America post 3)
Built upon from class today, this article discusses the hardship many Appalachian families are feeling as the coal mining business continues to evolve and industrialize. Although coal was the major 'boom' behind many of these towns, the 'bust' hits more than just those laid off by the industry. Like a chain reaction, other families and their businesses suffer; less income leads to less eating out leads to less income for restaurants, and it goes on and on.  This article is also good at showing that geography is more than spatial and economic: on certain levels, it's also relational, personal, cultural, and historic, giving residents strong feelings behind their decisions to stay.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 10:44 AM

This video really shows the relationship between sense of place versus economic geography. Even though the town is no longer the rich mining town it once was, the remaining residents still cling to the past and their sense of identity remains strong. It demonstrates that cultural heritage is a powerful factor that can remain long after dramatic economic changes. Even though there are few opportunities left in the town and the majority of its young people leave for greener pastures, some residents still identify so strongly with the area that they are willing to do whatever they can to revitalize their town.

Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Jewish And Mexican Cooking Meet In 'Challa-peño'

Alex Schmidt's grandparents say that the best Jewish food they've ever eaten came from Mexico. They remember a legendary husband-and-wife catering team who made downtown Mexico City feel like the shtetls of Eastern Europe.

 

Cultural processes, such as diffusion syncretism, are evident in this extraordinary podcast.  Ethnic neighborhoods, nostalgia for traditions, folk and popular cultures interacting, globalization and migration are all themes that could make this an interesting podcast to have students listen to it and analyze the geographic content embedded within it. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:36 PM
Sounds delicious!!!!
Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

In a World on the Move, a Tiny Land Strains to Cope - New York Times

In a World on the Move, a Tiny Land Strains to Cope - New York Times | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African nation of Cape Verde, where almost everyone has a relative abroad, is a microcosm of the forces of migration that are remaking societies across the globe.

 

Cool article on remittances in Cape Verde.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Watch Last Train Home on PBS. See more from POV.
Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world’s largest human migration.

 

 

Really depressing, but a really awesome documentary about Chinese New Year. Gives students a lot of deepened understanding regarding economic development, migration, mainland China, etc.

 

Here's a film question handout:

 

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8bz0dgds0QLakNKZjhxbGJZTms

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse.pdf - Google Drive

Luke Walker's insight:

Here's the project write-up, rubric and class zombie fact sheet for our short story project.

Please consult the document and bring your questions to class. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

Demographic Transition

Demographic Transition | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

H

Luke Walker's insight:

Here is an EXCELLENT overview of the Demographic Transition Model. Review it and know the various qualities of each stage.

Also make note of migration trends that are typical of each stage.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luke Walker from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

Mapping migration patterns and demographics by state.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 16, 2014 9:54 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving to the South.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 11:27 AM

units 1 & 7

dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 2014 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:20 PM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:23 PM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

Cameron Sinclair: The refugees of boom-and-bust | Video on TED.com

TED Talks At TEDGlobal U, Cameron Sinclair shows the unreported cost of real estate megaprojects gone bust: thousands of migrant construction laborers left stranded and penniless. To his fellow architects, he says there is only one ethical response.

 

Raises a lot of ethical questions about the treatment of migrant labor. Shows the dark side of what can happen when migrant labor goes terribly wrong resulting in forced homelessness and poverty. Modern day indentured servitude all in the search for remittances to send home.

 

Questions to ponder:

 

1) Why is so little done to help these migrant laborers in their camps?

2) Where are most of these laborers coming from? How does this relate to distance decay?

3) Is there an ethical (right, fair, or just) way to build skyscrapers with migrant labor?

more...
Yu Heng Andrew Hsia's comment, October 14, 2012 10:24 AM
Andrew H. 9B #27
Terrified and shock. The video gave us a clear view of what a migrant workers’ life is like. “Mainly Indian Pakistani, Sri Lankan, and Nepalese, these laborers risked everything to make money for their family back home.”(00:53). All these worker came overseas, away from their families to make money. However, after they arrived, the environment they lived in was harsh. “And when they arrive, they find themselves in labor camps with no water, no air conditioning, and their passports are taken away” (01:03) Those workers have no way to get back home and with their harsh living environment, none of the us can manage to survive. This video is meaningful to me as it raises social awareness that actions must be done to help those migrant workers. It also makes me realize that how lucky it is for me to live here in Taiwan. All the workers come from “the Rest” to “the West”. “The West” being more financially active should care more for the migrant workers. Democratic societies always talk about equal rights and stuff; however all these rights are only given to the citizens in those particular countries. How about migrant labors? No. they were treated like slaves. After watching this video, I just can’t stop thinking about how corrupt “the West” was. I hope that this video can make more and more people realize that we must take actions to help those migrant workers.
Alex Hsu's comment, October 14, 2012 10:53 AM
Alex H. 9B #6
After I watched this video, I was extremely surprised that many migrant labors have to suffer from this type of work. They risk their lives at work to feed their families. "These laborers risked everything to make money for their family back home." (00:50). Also, these workers get treated very unfairly, they don't get the essentials they need nor any fair treatment. "Last summer, more than 10,000 workers protested for the non payment of wages, poor quality of food, and inadequate housing." (01:30) With this harsh living environment, I don't think anyone's body can handle it. I don't think these workers are treated with any bit of respect. These workers are working so hard to support their family but their income is just unbelievably low. "And when they arrive, they find themselves in labor camps with no water, no air conditioning and their passports taken away." (00:57). In the end, i realized that "the west" takes advantage of these workers and I now know i am lucky to be born in a family like mine.
Areta Chu's comment, October 14, 2012 11:51 AM
Areta C. 9A #10 After watching this video, i was shocked for what benefits they give for the migrant labors. "40 present of of the countries 1,098 labor camp had violated minimum health and fire safety regulations."(1:23) i feel like "the west" shouldn't take unessential benefits from the migrant laborers that are already in a difficult situation. "The Rest" has to send back most of the money that was made at the work place but finding them selves in a place where there's no water, no air conditioning and their passports taken away.(00:57) There's no way back home, and there's no way, and no proof of arrival." (1:55) i feel lucky for what i have and live around in where people are comfortable and eat well, where people aren't usually living in such harsh conditions, i feel blessed with a family like mine.
Scooped by Luke Walker
Scoop.it!

The Global Scale of Migrant Money Flows - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com

A new study suggests that 1 in 10 people on the planet directly benefit from money sent home by migrants working in other countries. Here are figures detailing that money's impact on developing nations in 2006.

 

Excellent map that details global money flows, i.e. the migration of money. Remittances is a key issue in the global economy and a great statement about the relationship that exists between the "west" and the "rest"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luke Walker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

My first rescoop, courtesy of Nathan Parrish, Seth Dixon, Ph.D.

"Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel."

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration,  population.


Via Nathan Parrish, Seth Dixon
more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.