Walkerteach Geo
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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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PepsiCo Figures Tropicana’s Carbon Footprint - NYTimes.com

PepsiCo Figures Tropicana’s Carbon Footprint - NYTimes.com | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
PepsiCo calculated that the equivalent of 3.75 pounds of carbon dioxide is emitted to the atmosphere for each half-gallon carton of orange juice.
Luke Walker's insight:

PepsiCo (which owns Tropicana Orange Juice) measures the amount of carbon emissions it takes to create a half-gallon of orange juice.

Check out this article! 

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Protests Persuade Russell Athletic to Rehire Honduran Workers - NYTimes.com

Protests Persuade Russell Athletic to Rehire Honduran Workers - NYTimes.com | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The college anti-sweatshop movement persuaded Russell Athletic to agree to rehire 1,200 workers in Honduras.
Luke Walker's insight:

An anti-sweatshop movement in the US convinced a sportswear company to reopen a factory in Honduras that shutdown after works unionized.

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Global Witness

Global Witness | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Global Witness
Luke Walker's insight:

An online campaign that investigates various industries ranging from extraction to production.

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Mountaintop mining poisons fish

Mountaintop mining poisons fish | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Here'sDead and deformed fish indicate selenium pollution from mountaintop coal mining is causing permanent damage to the environment and poses serious health risks, says a biologist.

Luke Walker's insight:

Here's an academic article on the environmental impact of coal mining. Wake Forest University 2010.

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USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images

USA: Photographer captures America's rust belt with a set of eerie images | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

“These are the eerie images that show the collapse of America's industrial heritage as the rust-belt spread across previously proud cities that drove the US through the great Depression.”


Via David Worth, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Luke Walker's insight:

When we talk about globalization and the outsourcing of one country's industry to another location it might difficult to visualize the impact that is made by that outsourcing. This collection of photos captures the remnants of industry found in the American "Rust Belt."

I grew up in this region, and the widespread impact of outsourcing is apparent. For the first few decades following WWII areas in surrounding cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Cleveland were known for being incredibly vibrant and productive. These pictures capture what was left behind when these industries globalized and outsourced to places such as Northern Mexico and the east coast of China.

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David Worth's curator insight, October 2, 2014 2:46 PM
Really good set of images from a soon to be demolished power station.
patrimodus's curator insight, October 2, 2014 3:39 PM

belles photos rouillées

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Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 11:27 AM

units 1 & 7

dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 2014 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

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The Geography of a Pencil

A film from the Competitive Enterprise Institute, adapted from the 1958 essay by Leonard E. Read.

 

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource. 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Luke Walker's insight:

An interesting take on the pencil.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:17 PM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:23 AM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

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NIKE, Inc. - NIKE, Inc. Sustainable Business

NIKE, Inc. - NIKE, Inc. Sustainable Business | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

rated

Luke Walker's insight:

Nike's literature on its business and manufacturing processes.

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Labor standards help Cambodia keep customers - The New York Times

Luke Walker's insight:

A cool article on encouraging labor rights and sustainable industry in Cambodia.

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The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine

The Real Price of Gold — National Geographic Magazine | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The Price of Gold: In dollars and suffering, it's never been higher.
Luke Walker's insight:

An insightful article about the extraction of gold.

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25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries

25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The real powerful states of the world.
Luke Walker's insight:

What if 25 US Mega Corporations were ranked against the GDP of countries?

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Inside an Amazon Warehouse


Via Seth Dixon
Luke Walker's insight:

Think back to our materials economy system.

Where do images like this fit?

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noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 8:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.