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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World – The Awesome Daily - Your daily dose of awesome

31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World – The Awesome Daily - Your daily dose of awesome | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
31 Images That Show The True Face Of The World
Luke Walker's insight:

This is an interesting collection that touches on a lot of relevant themes. It should raise a lot of questions for you. The most important thing to keep in mind is what's the state of the world according to these images, and how do the people and places represented compare and contrast?

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CT Blake's curator insight, October 5, 2014 10:47 AM

I don't know HOW to use this yet....but I'm determined to make a lesson out of these pics.

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In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage

In India, More Women Demand Toilets Before Marriage | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
NILOKHERI, India -- An ideal groom in this dusty farming village is a vegetarian, does not drink, has good prospects for a stable job and promises his bride-to-be an amenity in high demand: a toilet.

 

 

Questions to Ponder:

1) What can you learn about the local rural culture of India from this article?

2) What is the status of women in India? How is it changing?

EQ: How does popular culture (western toilets) influence and impact the local culture (Indian marriage doweries and women's rights) of India? 

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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


Via Seth Dixon
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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

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60 minutes: India's love affair with gold

60 minutes: India's love affair with gold | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
60 Minutes on CBS News: India's love affair with gold - "No gold, no wedding," is a saying in India, indicating the importance of gold to Indian culture and tradition. Byron Pitts reports on India's obsession with gold.

 

Cultural values strongly impact consumption patterns.  India's preference for gold, combined with South Asia's growing population, also leads to environmental impacts around the world as India's obsession for gold drives the global market, accounting for 1/3 of the trade.  This video explores the cultural (and economic) logic behind the enormous importance of gold jewelry in Indian society.      


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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


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A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. The National Post crunches the data
Luke Walker's insight:

This graphic gives a glimpse at how economic development affects human development of women in the world. It considers data of health, education etc.

Questions to Ponder:

1) Why focus on women?
2) Why measure these items? What have they got to do with “development”? Choose 1 and explain in detail.

 

3) Based on the information in this chart, what’s the connection between economic development and human development? Why do you suppose this connection exists? 

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Tinya Chang's comment, February 20, 2013 2:54 AM
1. Women take up half of the population.
2. From the data recorded in the category "expected number of years in school," we can see how educated most people in the country are. In order for countries to be able to provide education for their people, they need to develop education systems along with economic supports. Education can also help individuals develop skills that will strengthen the S.P.E.C. of the country.
3. Humans can only develop certain skills if they have financial support (education). An undeveloped human cannot contribute much to the economy. This connection exists because each development would not be possible without the other.
Powell Hung's comment, February 20, 2013 3:09 AM
1) This research focused on women because in many countries, male and female are not equal, so, they do this to show that which countries take women as important and which countries do not.
2) They measure this to see the birth rate in each countries, women who get education in each countries , and the importance of women in each countries. For example, by looking at the life expectancy at birth, you can know the birth rates in a certain country.
3) The connection between economic development and human development comes in many kinds. If there are developed people in a certain country, then the economy of the country might increase by their help. Then, because of the developed economy, many people can have a good education and also can have a job that can get a lot of money. This connection exits because many people that has a lot of wealth or people who are very developed are in the countries that are developed.
Ivy Buu's comment, February 20, 2013 3:57 AM
1) Women are the only sources to repopulate the earth. Without women, the world could not go on or develop.
2) The reason they measure these items is to compare countries and their level of development. According to the percentage of a country's TFR, we can tell how many women in that country are actually receiving the right education. For a country to be developed well, they all have to follow the order of SPEC. They have to have a good economy, government, connections, and national personality. For a country to have all of those things, their citizens have to receive proper education to help that country develop, including women.
3) For citizens to be able to develop, they have to receive proper education so they will be able to contribute to their country in the future. To receive good education, that country would have to be able to support their citizens enough so they could have a good living and learning environment. That is where a good economy counts. To have properly educated citizens, a country will need a financially supportive government. Without money and order, a country would not have the materials or necessities to educate their people. One cannot exist without the other.
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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 10:49 PM

The images I was able to see were moving. The image that stands out most were the children in gym class. Young men were able to wear gym like clothing and the girls needed to be covered head to toe wearing dresses.Powerful.I was able to see only a few and the rest seemed to be lightened to the point where you could not see them anymore. The words also seemed to be blocked out. =(

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Great visuals on the status of women in the world.

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