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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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How the Experts Would Fix Cities

How the Experts Would Fix Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
More than 50 percent of the world's population now lives in urban areas.

 

 

Great way to compare your thoughts about how cities can and should be changed, and what the "experts" know about the necessity for urban geography change.


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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:21 AM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 8:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today

Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

This article links the growing global population with the rise of megacities in the developing world.  

 

The largest megacities are:

 1.  Tokyo            32.5 million    

2.  Seoul             20.6 m

3.  Mexico City  20.5 m

4.  New York     19.8 m

5.  Mumbai        19.2 m

6.  Jakarta          18.9 m

7.  Sao Paulo      18.8 m

8.  Delhi              18.6 m

9.  Shanghai       16.7 m

10. Manila          16.3 m


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Carolyn Steel: How food shapes our cities | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Every day, in a city the size of London, 30 million meals are served. But where does all the food come from? Architect Carolyn Steel discusses the daily miracle of feeding a city, and shows how ancient food routes shaped the modern world.
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The Burgess and Hoyt Model

The Burgess and Hoyt Model | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use – eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors.

 

A useful source for learning about city zone models and urban geography.

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6 TEDxTalks envisioning the city of the future

6 TEDxTalks envisioning the city of the future | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
According to the United Nations, by the year of 2050, 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. So what will the city of the future look like?

 

6 TED Talks to get you thinking about how you would alter the cities of the future to make them better equipped for a world of 9 Billion by 2050. Remember it has been estimated that roughly 6 billion people will be living in cities by 2050. How do we prep our megacities of the future for this rapid population change? What problems will we face? How will "The West" face these problems? "The Rest"?

 

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Robert Neuwirth on our "shadow cities" | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Robert Neuwirth, author of "Shadow Cities," finds the world’s squatter sites -- where a billion people now make their homes -- to be thriving centers of ingenuity and innovation. He takes us on a tour.

 

Powerful discussion and argument for the future of squatter communities or shanty towns. A point to consider, by 2050 our cities will hold roughly 6 billion people. How can we deal with the issues of our cities at present and prevent the expansion of squatter communities? How do we incorporate such communities into formal organization of cities?

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Robert Hammond: Building a park in the sky | Video on TED.com

TED Talks New York was planning to tear down the High Line, an abandoned elevated railroad in Manhattan, when Robert Hammond and a few friends suggested: Why not make it a park? He shares how it happened in this tale of local cultural activism.

 

Cool TED talk on the NYC high line city park.

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The city with 180km traffic jams

The city with 180km traffic jams | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Next time you complain about being stuck in traffic, spare a thought for the drivers in Brazil's biggest city, Sao Paulo.See it on Scoop.it, via Geography - The World Around Us...
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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 10:51 AM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow

TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Many cities are large; the rate at which these ten cities highlight a distinct spatial pattern and separate them from the rest. Which regions have the fastest growing cities? Which regions don't? Why geographic factor account for the rapid growth?

CITY                Increase by 2025

1.  Delhi          6.4 million

2.  Dhaka       6.3 m

3.  Kinshasa  6.3 m

4.  Mumbai   5.8 m

5.  Karachi    5.6 m

6.  Lagos        5.2 m

7.  Kolkata     4.6 m

8.  Shanghai  3.4 m

9.  Manila      3.3 m

10. Lahore     3.2 m

 


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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:26 PM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.

 

 

Really cool infographic that let's you think about what it would take to produce your own food.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 5:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 6:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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The world's most expensive cities - Telegraph

The world's most expensive cities - Telegraph | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
New research has named the Norwegian capital as the world's costliest city, with London in 10th.See it on Scoop.it, via Geography - The World Around Us...

Notice a regional pattern here? Think West vs the Rest?
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Mega-Farms to Hit City Rooftops

Mega-Farms to Hit City Rooftops | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
Plans for a rooftop farm are the largest in the world.

 

 

NYC has acres of unutilized agricultural real estate. What are the benefits of efforts such as these?

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Shipping container "cities" bring creative, funky approach to green construction | Sustainable Cities Collective

Shipping container "cities" bring creative, funky approach to green construction | Sustainable Cities Collective | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

  Container City I, London 

 

Sustainable city development using recycled cargo containers. REALLY COOL!

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Kent Larson: Brilliant designs to fit more people in every city | Video on TED.com

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

 

This video presents an amazing overview of current efforts to make cities into more efficient areas of human settlement. Loads of discussion regarding sustainability and realistic solutions.

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Why cities want parks in the sky (BBC News)

Why cities want parks in the sky (BBC News) | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it

Once an elevated freight railway track, New York's High Line is now an oasis - and other cities are following suit. What's the secret of its success?

My students recently completed a project related to this, the redesign of future city landscapes in response to our growing global population.

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