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Walkerteach Geo
Media and Classroom Hub for Mr. Walker's Geography Class
Curated by Luke Walker
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Jewish And Mexican Cooking Meet In 'Challa-peño'

Alex Schmidt's grandparents say that the best Jewish food they've ever eaten came from Mexico. They remember a legendary husband-and-wife catering team who made downtown Mexico City feel like the shtetls of Eastern Europe.

 

Cultural processes, such as diffusion syncretism, are evident in this extraordinary podcast.  Ethnic neighborhoods, nostalgia for traditions, folk and popular cultures interacting, globalization and migration are all themes that could make this an interesting podcast to have students listen to it and analyze the geographic content embedded within it. 


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:36 PM
Sounds delicious!!!!
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Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away

Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away | Walkerteach Geo | Scoop.it
A writer who has crossed many borders finds the one between Nogales, Ariz., and Mexico to be the oddest frontier of all.

 

Given that most of the articles concerning the border these days reflect on the policing of the border, the illegal flow of people, drugs or guns across the border, or the violence in the borderlands, this is refreshing change of pace.  Paul Theroux focused on the cultural connections that form, not in spite of the border, but because of the border and the cultural vibrance of Nogales, Sonora. 


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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 19, 2012 1:21 PM
Everyone is always talking and writing about Mexicans crossing the border, taking jobs, and smuggling drugs into the US. It’s nice to find an article showing their humility and kindness to others. These people in this town just over the border are trying to improve it by adding security, school programs, and keeping their town clean.

I think there’s so much that can be learned from this article. As Theroux states, “the neighborhoods just across the fence are not representative of the town at large, which is a lesson in how to know another country: stay longer, travel deeper, overcome timidity.” So, while, yes, there are dangerous areas in Mexico, not every town is the same. Not all Mexicans are dangerous drug dealers who want to steal your job.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

cool