W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning
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W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning
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Schoology vs. Edmodo; How Schoology solved my iPad workflow woes

Schoology vs. Edmodo; How Schoology solved my iPad workflow woes | W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning | Scoop.it

"In a previous post from December http://ow.ly/mr5pa , I wrote about how I was (sadly) switching from Edmodo http://edmodo.com/ (my long-time LMS love) to Schoology. http://schoology.com/ ; Of the 25 schools I support, 33 classes of students are using a Learning Management System. Since my December revelation, 26 have switched to Schoology and the remainder stayed with Edmodo. I myself maintained both an Edmodo group and started a Schoology course for the twice-weekly after school Student Innovation Team I lead. This, combined with the 33 classes, was a great way for me to learn more about the differences between the two platforms. I've learned a lot, and wanted to share it with you! Below is a quick overview of what we've learned when it comes to Edmodo vs. Schoology."


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Linda Jones's curator insight, June 28, 2013 12:35 PM

Great comparison. Liked finding out more info on Schoology.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 7:21 PM

I have always been a big supporter for Schoology as a LMS.

Marita Diffenbaugh's curator insight, July 5, 2013 3:55 PM

I like the feature of being able to grade the discussions. I love Edmodo, however, Schoology looks like a great solution for secondary classes and their workflow. 

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Flipping the classroom for mastery learning

Flipping the classroom for mastery learning | W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning | Scoop.it
We all know that students don't learn at the same pace. And everyone jokes about the broken "sage on the stage" classroom model. These teachers are doing something about it.
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Curated resources on Flipped Mastery Learning

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Edmodo

Edmodo | W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning | Scoop.it
Mom to 4 Kiddos and Techie Teacher to 3rd Graders Tammy is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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Edmodo resources

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Voicethread

Kaylene Schoenhard is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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Ideas for using VoiceThread

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Flipping the Classroom

Katrina Hall & Lynn Dizazzo is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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A lot of resources on Flipped Classroom

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Connectivism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Connectivism is a theory of learning which emphasizes the role of the social and cultural context opposed to a more essentialist notion which foregrounds the individual. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD, an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001)Activity theory.[1] Central to connectivism is the relationship between work experience, learning and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, thus the root of the theory's name.[2] It bears some similarity with Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The add-on "a learning theory for the digital age", that appears in Siemens' paper[3] indicates the emphasis it gives to how technology affects how people live, how they communicate and how they learn.

One aspect of connectivism is its central metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organisation, information, data, feelings and images. Connectivism sees learning as the process of creating connections and elaborating a network. Not all connections are of equal strength.

The idea of organisations as cognitive systems where knowledge is distributed across nodes traces back to the Perceptron and is directly borrowed from Connectionism, "a paradigm in cognitive sciences that sees mental or behavioral phenomena as the emergent processes of interconnected networks of simple units".

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W7CL01 ‘Flipping’ Mother Tongue oracy lessons with digital storytelling and social learning - Google Drive

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My presentation slides

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Shamblesguru's comment, July 6, 2013 7:01 AM
Digital Storytelling Resources http://www.shambles.net/pages/staff/dstorytell/
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ICT Tools I use in classroom

Kwan Tuck Soon is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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My 'trade secrets' haha

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Digital Storytelling

"…digital storytelling combines the best of two worlds: the "new world" of digitized video, photography and art, and the "old world" of telling stories.
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Resources for digital storytelling

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Web 2.0 Tools for Educators

Social media provides a variety of tools, commonly referred to as Web 2.0, that educators can use to engage students and enhance essential skills (communication, collaboration, creativity, media literacy, technological proficiency, global awareness.
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Learning with 'e's: Theories for the digital age: Connectivism

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Insightful blog post about Connectivism by Steve Wheeler @timbuckteeth

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Social learning theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Social learning theory is a perspective that states that people learn within a social context. It is facilitated through concepts such as modeling and observational learning.[1] People, especially children, learn from the environment and seek acceptance from society by learning through influential models. Social learning theory is a perspective that states that social behavior (any type of behavior that we display socially) is learned primarily by observing and imitating the actions of others. The social behavior is also influenced by being rewarded and/or punished for these actions.

Social learning theory was derived in an attempt by Robert Sears and other scholars to merge psychoanalytic with stimulus-response learning theory into an inclusive explanation of human behavior. Sears and others drew their conclusions from the clinical richness of psychoanalysis and the rigor of stimulus-response learning. Albert Bandura, conversely, abandoned the psychoanalytic and drive features of the approach. His approach emphasized cognitive and information-processing capabilities that facilitate social behavior. Both theories proposed were envisioned as a general context for the understanding of human behavior, but Bandura’s theory provided a stronger theoretical beginning.[2]

According to Social Learning theory, models are an important source for learning new behaviors and for achieving behavioral change in institutionalized settings.[3] Social learning theory is derived from the work of Albert Bandura which proposed that observational learning can occur in relation to three models:[4]

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