Art en Vrac et Mu...
Follow
Find
50 views | +0 today
Art en Vrac et Musique
Un peu de tout ... si c'est artistique ...
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Fournier Franck
Scoop.it!

DarwinTunes | Survival of the funkiest

DarwinTunes | Survival of the funkiest | Art en Vrac et Musique | Scoop.it

Join our unique experiment, and be the first to hear music as it evolves, right between your ears!

The organic world – animals, plants, viruses – is the product of Darwinian evolution by natural selection. Natural selection expresses the idea that organisms (more accurately their genes) vary and that variability has consequences. Some variants are bad and go extinct; others are good and do exceptionally well. This process, repeated for two billion years, has given us the splendours of life on earth.

It has also given us the splendours of human culture. This may seem like a bold claim, but it is self-evidently true. People copy cultural artifacts – words, songs, images, ideas – all the time from other people. Copying is imperfect: there is "mutation". Some cultural mutants do better than others: most die but some are immensely successful; they catch on; they become hits. This process, repeated for fifty thousand years, has given us all that we make, say and do; it is the process of "cultural evolution".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fournier Franck
Scoop.it!

Fete du vin Bordeaux est un rendez vous a ne pas manquer pour tous les amoureux de la fete

Fete du vin Bordeaux est un rendez vous a ne pas manquer pour tous les amoureux de la fete | Art en Vrac et Musique | Scoop.it
Fete du vin Bordeaux est un rendez vous à ne pas manquer pour tous les amoureux de la fête, grands vins de Bordeaux et des musiques du monde : 4 jours de liesse et de festivités inoubliables !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fournier Franck
Scoop.it!

Karine Stader | Facebook

Karine Stader | Facebook | Art en Vrac et Musique | Scoop.it
Karine Stader is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Karine Stader and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more open and connected.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fournier Franck from Computational Music Analysis
Scoop.it!

Big Data Helps ID Who's "Stealing" That Song

Big Data Helps ID Who's "Stealing" That Song | Art en Vrac et Musique | Scoop.it

The same kind of digital fingerprinting that helps music lovers identify songs using apps such as Shazam and Soundhound is also being used to help artists, performers and rights holders identify who is using those songs - yet another way big data is changing the way we live and do business.

 

TuneSat, a New York-based company with roots in the music and entertainment industry, has a very simple business model: Put information in the hands of music rights holders so they can obtain the royalties that are lawfully theirs.

 

Performing rights organizations (PROs), like ASCAP and BMI here in the U.S., are the organizations typically charged with gathering performance information about members' musical works. The PRO monitors public performances of works to make sure that royalties are getting to the artist or other rights holder. They also work to prevent unlicensed performances of a work.

 

On television, however, things get a bit more dicey. The performance of music in this medium is governed by synchronization rights, and is often self-reported. Whenever a TV show wraps up production, someone on the crew (usually a low-level production assistant or intern) is tasked with filling out a cue sheet that specifies what music was used in the show, for how long, and how it was used. Such reports often come in late and rife with errors.

 

TuneSat fits right inside this lengthy, centralized process. Instead of relying on large, cumbersome organizations and self-reporting media outlets to obtain performance and synchronization information, TuneSat uses digital fingerprints of music to actively monitor more than 300 television channels in the U.S. and Europe - and makes reports available on when and how music is being used.

 

TuneSat’s model completely inverts the old copyright/royalty model. For a nominal subscription fee (starting at $10/month for 10 tracks of music), any artist or music publishing organization can actively track their music across a wide range of media outlets.

 

Once enrolled, clients submit digital masters of the songs in question, which TuneSat then records and analyzes to create a digital DNA.

 

With so much variation in musical performances, one would expect TuneSat to require a back-end infrastructure that used Hadoop or some other big-data tool for unstructured data. But Woods said that what’s ultimately stored and used to track and find songs is a very structured digital signature.

 

Beyond the use of open-source technology to drive yet another startup to operate at a minimal IT cost, TuneSat decentralizes and automates a formerly cumbersome data-gathering process. What used to take months now can be done within the hour.

 

The result is yet another way big data and advanced analytics disrupt existing business models by quickly and inexpensively revealing information either actively hidden via intentional secrecy, or passively buried in the depths of bureaucracy and tangled processes.

 

When it comes to monitoring TV, that may not cause much trouble. But TuneSat’s Web Monitoring Service uses a similar approach to track millions of websites. 

As big data allows services like TuneSat to look deeper into the Web (the service can identify music clips as short as three seconds), it could spark potential friction between music users and rights holders.


Via Olivier Lartillot
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fournier Franck
Scoop.it!

MHL FNAC "GAGNANTS CONCOURS LOU REED" / FETE DE LA MUSIQUE

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.486578771367869.132200.100000472524641&type=1

more...
No comment yet.