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Black Hawk Voodoo
Traditional West African, New Orleans, and Haitian Voodoo and ATR
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Nigeria: 'Snakes a Threat to Boko Haram'

Nigeria: 'Snakes a Threat to Boko Haram' | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Some members of the Islamist sect Boko Haram, have confessed that many of them are fleeing the Sambisa Forest to areas across Borno State because of spiritual attacks from mysterious snakes and bees that have killed many of their leaders.
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Respect the Voodoo! XXX

#MamiWata #Dan #Danbala #HoodooTyE #ObeahTyE #VoodooTyE #OloyeDivinePrinceTyEmmecca #VoodooChiefDivinePrince

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Asamoah Gyan Accused of Being ‘Angel of Death’ Truth or Superstition?

Asamoah Gyan Accused of Being ‘Angel of Death’ Truth or Superstition? | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
If there is one thing you can trust Ghanaians to do, it is to look for underlying reasons for any event, no matter how innocuous. People are always looking
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The Magic of Nigeria - PANATV

The Magic of Nigeria - PANATV | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Made by master documentary filmmaker Dr Ola Balogun, this is a short but powerful …
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Art of the Akan

Art of the Akan | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
From the moment of their first known contact with the West, in 1471, the Akan people of Ghana have been recognized for their rich and captivating culture. In particular, the Akan can boast a vibrant artistic tradition of visual forms including,...
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Fante

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The History of Brer Rabbit - Brer Rabbit

The History of Brer Rabbit - Brer Rabbit | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Brer Rabbit is a character in folktales of African-American and Native American origin. He’s known as a “trickster” character, but it’s more like he’s sly and smart instead of conniving. In folklore, the animal trickster represents an extreme form of behavior which people may be forced to use in extreme circumstances in order to survive.... Read more »
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Asafo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Asafo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Asafo are traditional warrior groups in Akan culture. The word derives from sa, meaning war, and fo, meaning people. The traditional role of the asafo companies was defence of the state.

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Saint Malo Remembered (83 Page Thesis)

Saint Malo Remembered (83 Page Thesis) | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
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This research explores the unique process of creolization that occurred in Southern Louisiana through the development of the figure of San Maló over time. His transformation from historic rebel to religious icon takes place through the devices of folklore, poetry, and song. This developmental process of a culture redefining its heroes through oral tradition represents the dynamism of creolization. The transformative process of San Maló serves as an exemplary representation of how a culture negotiates its own history with what is deemed necessary and beneficial to the culture’s survival. All information on this transformation was gathered through historic research and personal interviews with members of the Voodoo faith community and scholars in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The intention of this project is to celebrate the African-American oral tradition and its unique existence and transformation in Southern Louisiana from the colonial era to contemporary Creole society.

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A Land Called Louisiana, part II: Undermining Slavery from the Cypress Swamps

A Land Called Louisiana, part II: Undermining Slavery from the Cypress Swamps | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
How Louisiana's geography aided communities of the formerly enslaved
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Essays on Life, Art and Science: HAIRSTYLES IN AFRICAN CULTURE

Essays on Life, Art and Science: HAIRSTYLES IN AFRICAN CULTURE | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
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Monster of the Week: The Asasabonsam

Monster of the Week: The Asasabonsam | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
When we think of vampires, we often envision the European type, not realizing that there are all types of vampires throughout the world. One of the more interes
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Death Rituals

Death Rituals | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Descriptions of various death rituals from around the world
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Native American Beliefs

Because they lived so close to nature, all Native American peoples from the Stone Age to the modern era knew that death from hunger, disease, or enemies was never far away. The various death customs and beliefs, which first evolved during the invasions of Asians from Siberia to Alaska across a land bridge during the last Ice Age at least 12,000 years ago, gave them the means to cope with that experience. Individual tribes maintained their own death customs and adapted them to their regional environments into which they migrated, although such rituals and beliefs could pass from one group to the other through trade and intermarriage. Most Native American tribes believed that the souls of the dead passed into a spirit world and became part of the spiritual forces that influenced every aspect of their lives. Many tribes believed in two souls: one that died when the body died and one that might wander on and eventually die.

Burial customs varied widely from tribe to tribe. Indians disposed of their dead in a variety of ways. Arctic tribes, for example, simply left their dead on the frozen ground for wild animals to devour. The ancient mound-building Hopewell societies of the Upper Midwest, by contrast, placed the dead in lavishly furnished tombs. Southeastern tribes practiced secondary bone burial. They dug up their corpses, cleansed the bones, and then reburied them. The Northeast Iroquois, before they formed the Five Nations Confederation in the seventeenth century, saved skeletons of the deceased for a final mass burial that included furs and ornaments for the dead spirits' use in the afterlife. Northwest coastal tribes put their dead in mortuary cabins or canoes fastened to poles. Further south, California tribes practiced cremation. In western mountain areas tribes often deposited their dead in caves or fissures in the rocks. Nomadic tribes in the Great Plains region either buried their dead, if the ground was soft, or left them on tree platforms or on scaffolds. Central and South Atlantic tribes embalmed and mummified their dead. But during outbreaks of smallpox or other diseases leading to the sudden deaths of many tribe members, survivors hurriedly cast the corpses into a mass grave or threw them into a river.

Rites among Native Americans tended to focus on aiding the deceased in their afterlife. Some tribes left food and possessions of the dead person in or near the grave site. Other groups, such as the Nez Perce of the Northwest, sacrificed wives, slaves, and a favorite horse of a dead warrior. Among many tribes, mourners, especially widows, cut their hair. Some Native Americans discarded personal ornaments or blacked their faces to honor the dead. Others gashed their arms and legs to express their grief. California tribes engaged in wailing, staged long funeral ceremonies, and held an anniversary mourning ritual after one or two years. Southwest Hopi wailed on the day of the death, and cried a year later.

Some Southwestern tribes, especially the Apache and Navajo, feared the ghosts of the deceased who were believed to resent the living. The nomadic Apache buried corpses swiftly and burned the deceased's house and possessions. The mourning family purified itself ritually and moved to a new place to escape their dead family member's ghost. The Navajo also buried their dead quickly with little ceremony. Navajos exposed to a corpse had to undergo a long and costly ritual purification treatment.

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The Bwiti Religion and the psychoactive plant Tabernanthe iboga

The Bwiti Religion and the psychoactive plant Tabernanthe iboga | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Giorgio Samorini's article of review and personal experiences within the Bwiti religion of Gabon Africa
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Speaking to the Dead

Speaking to the Dead | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
In the jungles of Central Africa, holy men from a religion called Bwiti believe they have found a way to talk to the dead. The key is a mind-altering drug that brings on violent, terrifying visions, and occasionally even death.
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How Enlightenment is the Process of Creation in the Universe in Reverse - Waking Times « Waking Times

How Enlightenment is the Process of Creation in the Universe in Reverse - Waking Times « Waking Times | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
How Enlightenment is the Process of Creation in the Universe in Reverse
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More Brazilians worshipping the African gods | Anancy Magazine

More Brazilians worshipping the African gods | Anancy Magazine | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
More black and white Brazilians are openly worshipping the Yoruba African gods.
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The Opon and the Beautiful Osun Mask

The Opon and the Beautiful Osun Mask | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.
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THE SALEM WITCHCRAFT TRIALS: A biographical sketch of Tituba.

Biography of Tituba, key player in the Salem witchcraft trials.
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Brooklyn Museum: Arts of Africa: Asafo Company Flag (Frankaa)

Brooklyn Museum: Arts of Africa: Asafo Company Flag (Frankaa) | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
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Asafo Company Flag (Frankaa)

Asafo is a Fante military institution, made up of local companies, each with its own name, number, regalia, shrine and set of flags, and imagery. This Asafo flag most likely dates from before Ghanaian independence in 1957 (note the British Union Jack in the upper-left canton) and served as an emblem of pride. The image in the field, of a creature looming over a decapitated corpse, suggests a severe warning to hostile parties. Fante arts, from a coastal area subject to more than five hundred years of direct interaction with European traders, bear witness to a long history of the creative borrowing of European forms. The three-headed monster here was probably inspired by the mythical creatures of European heraldry.

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The New Orleans Cabildo

The New Orleans Cabildo | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
The Cabildo -- New Orleans' unique Spanish city government -- touched the life of every citizen of the city during its thirty-four years of existence, and its decisions often had an impact on the administration of Louisiana far beyond the confines of New Orleans itself. Moreover, its archival records, with lavish and detailed information about every aspect of life within Spanish New Orleans, are the richest of any city in the Spanish Borderlands. Yet curiously, until now there has been no thorough analysis of this influential institution.In The New Orleans Cabildo, Gilbert C. Din and John E. Harkins have filled that scholarly gap and made a significant contribution to our understanding of the Spanish hegemony in Louisiana. New Orleans, which had been a small, isolated, and insignificant town under the French grew to be a thriving center of trade, communications, and economic activity under Spanish rule. Din and Harkins examine the offices and personnel of the Cabildo and explore its vast responsibilities in the areas of justice, medicine and health, public works, land grants and building regulations, ceremonial and liaison duties, regulation of markets and food prices, and treatment of slaves and free blacks, among others. They also review the difficulties encountered by the Cabildo and the ways it responded to the city's -- and the colony's -- economic, legal, social, and military problems.Through careful and thoughtful utilization of documents from archives in Louisiana and Spain -- particularly minutes from the Cabildo meetings -- Din and Harkins have produced in The New Orleans Cabildo a model history of a complex and all-encompassing institution.
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San Malo's Maroons and Manilamen in Louisiana: Part One

San Malo's Maroons and Manilamen in Louisiana: Part One | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Years ago, I came across a bit of information that made Louisiana seem bigger and more mysterious for it: far out in the low marsh of Southeastern Louisiana the first Asian community in what is now...
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We have always believed in a Supreme God

We have always believed in a Supreme God | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
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Onyankopon, Olodumare Mungu, Mulungu, Katonda, Ngai, Asis, Ruwa, Ruhanga, Jok, Modimo, Unkulunkulu...

"We've always believed in a Supreme God or Deity."  #HoodooTyE

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Injured Black Star Player- Jerry Akaminko’s Family Says JUJU Was Used On Him & They Will Expose the Person Soon…

Injured Black Star Player- Jerry Akaminko’s Family Says JUJU Was Used On Him & They Will Expose the Person Soon… | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
You cannot separate the African from Superstition. No one dies a natural death in Africa even if the person is 120 and nothing happens on its own---it is be
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Black Magic, New Orleans Style

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THNOC - Voodoo in New Orleans Bibliography

THNOC - Voodoo in New Orleans Bibliography | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
Bibliography of sources relating to New Orleans’ Voodoo history, as compiled by The Historic New Orleans Collection.
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AFRICAN VOODOO | Vodun African Religion | spirituality

AFRICAN VOODOO | Vodun African Religion | spirituality | Black Hawk Voodoo | Scoop.it
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