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Google Earth Tour Builder lets you tell stories through maps

Google Earth Tour Builder lets you tell stories through maps | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Google has used Earth and Maps to tell tales of unfolding tragedies and soldiers fighting for our country. Now its opening up those tools to the public,

Via José Carlos
Dean Meyers's insight:

It seems that mapping, as a storytelling tool, is becoming extremely popular, with new sets and tools opening every day (see my post yesterday on www.vizworld.com about CartoDB.com updating their mapping tools with new capabilities and free subscriptions). 

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This is Visual Journalism - Deadliest countries for Journalism (Infographic)

This is Visual Journalism - Deadliest countries for Journalism (Infographic) | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Among the many subjects that have been illustrated in infographics, in the past few weeks, we picked two human tragedies that, despite being apart 70 years, have so much in common. Many newspapers celebrated the 70th anniversary of the A-bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki with visuals that show the events that ultimately lead to the …

Via Visualoop
Dean Meyers's insight:

Numbers are numbers, and visuals that illustrate quantities can say much more, and say it more quickly, than reciting the numbers by themselves.


This graphic, from The Washington Post, allows for fast comparison of the most potentially dangerous countries for journalists to work in.


Are there any surprises when you scan the graphic? 

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How Buzzfeed is Taking Over the World - One Video at a Time

How Buzzfeed is Taking Over the World - One Video at a Time | VizWorld | Scoop.it
In July 2015, BuzzFeed videos generated over 1.9B views across the main video platforms. We take a look at how Buzzfeed video is taking over the world.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Buzzfeed is perhaps the ultimate curation/content producer: as a hybrid of finding and sharing content that seems to go viral at Buzzfeed's slightest touch, they have blended the deepest of analytics on viewer's reactions to video content with the ultimate agile methods of editing and re-editing content to get the greatest buzz going.


The curation piece of the puzzle is Buzzfeed's use of Facebook and YouTube to distribute content. Buzzfeed's been careful to take advantage of Facebook's autoplay in the first few seconds of a Facebook video, loading the interest in the content in that vital few seconds to grab the viewer's interest. (Video content creators, take note!)


And what's the secret formula behind Buzzfeed's "virality"?


When Jonathan Perelman, then BuzzFeed’s GM of Video & VP of Agency Strategy, spoke at the 2014 ReelSummit, he shared the brand's magic formula for video content marketing, and confirmed that consumers share video content for 5 main reasons:

  • To be social
  • To express how they are feeling about a particular topic
  • To show off, or humble-brag
  • To prove they were the first ones to find something
  • To make friends and colleagues laugh



Source: How Buzzfeed is Taking Over the World - One Video at a Time http://www.reelseo.com/buzzfeed-video-strategy/#ixzz3k95qER3F 
©ReelSEO.com, All Rights Reserved 


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iSight Camera Replacement Program for iPhone 6 Plus - Apple Support

iSight Camera Replacement Program for iPhone 6 Plus - Apple Support | VizWorld | Scoop.it
iSight Camera Replacement Program for iPhone 6 Plus
Dean Meyers's insight:

If you bought an iPhone6 Plus between September 2014 and January 2015, you might have noticed blurry pics from the rear camera. 


Apple has noted the situation and is offering replacements for those units (which does not extend the original warrantee) and has a way to check if your serial number is among those units.


Go to this page to check if your phone is among those that can receive the replacement: https://www.apple.com/support/iphone6plus-isightcamera/

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Future Doc: Digital Storytelling, Virtual Reality and Gaming

Future Doc: Digital Storytelling, Virtual Reality and Gaming | VizWorld | Scoop.it
The Millennial and Gen C generations who are native digital users will be the largest segment of the population worldwide within the next decade. It's a demographic shift that will have a significant, continual impact on the way we communicate across media, including how we incorporate a technologically advanced visual dialogue into our everyday lives.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Native digital users are, more and more, visual digital users, expecting video and high-end graphics in their games and interactions. Designers will have to become more involved not only in experience design but in understanding how to create visual narrative.


But that will not leave developers off the hook, they will also have to understand narrative storytelling, timing, and efficiently in delivering content and material. And what happens when interactivity might depend on connectivity?What will be the work-around when you cannot get online or have data download?


It will be a more complicated yet visually compelling game all around.

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More video! More mobile! More drones! Mary Meeker's 2015 Internet Trends report

More video! More mobile! More drones! Mary Meeker's 2015 Internet Trends report | VizWorld | Scoop.it

Mary Meeker's annual Internet Trends (2015 edition) has been released as a 157-slide deck, and I went through it last night. It's all about Millennials, we love drones (but not for Amazon Prime deliveries), freelance work abounds, and everyone has a device in their hands with terrific visuals and loads of video. But there's more...!

Dean Meyers's insight:

No mention of the government sector, what happened to the cloud, 3D, gaming, VR? 157 pages of charts and tables, and much deep and rich info, some following past trends (the shrinkage of print, and the shrinkage of marketing dollars going to print, which is no surprise), the growth of the China Internet market, followed by India (and where is Brazil?).

A few pages dedicated to business and industry's potential use of drones is a little surprising, perhaps. BYOD use by millennials, not so much, and millennials get much coverage, particularly in what they want/expect from traditional workplaces. You might get comfort in having your thoughts reinforced or verified, but it's truly a deep document with a good overview of the commercial internet, with what I perceive as a strong slant towards the marketer's point of view.

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Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat - Committee to Protect Journalists

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat - Committee to Protect Journalists | VizWorld | Scoop.it
On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around...
Dean Meyers's insight:

Pictures are worth more than 1,000 words: they are worth at least 14 lives, in the case of the killings over the publication of a cartoon in the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.


Cartoons have been used to share political messages at least as far back as the French Revolution; the grotesque images from Goya in his series, Los desastres de la guerra from the early 1800's, and carried as editorial features in major newspapers throughout the world throughout the 20th century.


The article linked here is from the Committee to Protect Journalists an independent, nonprofit organization that promotes press freedom worldwide.


This article exposes how political cartoonists, now using social media to share their images, are facing not only violence from religious and political extremists but arrests and prison sentences in their own countries when their governments feel under attack or made vulnerable by a cartoonist's pictorial excoriation or exposure of wrongdoing.


In an age when memes are easy to create to poke fun at what may be obvious truths by quickly marrying a picture to a snappy line of text, it's easy to take for granted both how powerful the old-fashioned cartoon can be. Behind the simplicity and association with comic strips and superhero stories is the power of the cartoonist's singular voice, whether in pen and ink or drawn on a digital tablet, daring to speak openly.


Whether you agree or not with the content, and even if you don't like the aesthetic of a simple drawing of a stick figure with uneven, handwritten text, cartoonists, and most particularly cartoonists who choose to tell stories with political, social or even religious stories, make targets of themselves as soon as they share their images.


The committee to Protect Journalists recognizes that because of the great power of the image, cartoonists who choose political journalism as their field of work are now facing persecution, restrictions and prison from their own governments. Even their publishers are  under attack.


Worth a 1,000 word? Far more than that.

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Radical Recombinations | LEANUX NYC

Radical Recombinations | LEANUX NYC | VizWorld | Scoop.it

A lot of folks tweeted that their brain hurt during #LeanUX15 last week in Brooklyn. My brain mostly just lit up, I thought I was ok, but then around Sunday or Monday mine started to hurt, too… for days. There was just so much to digest. Which is what made it hard to blog. So I decided not to blog much and to reflect.

I keep coming back to LeanUX NYC because it feels designed to share not just learning about lean ideas, but lean learning in context, in response to the kinds of problems we find ourselves experiencing in organizations and larger society now. This year there were information-packed talks about lean ideas (whether under the banner of Lean, Agile/Scrum, Lean Startup, and/or Design Thinking) and then super expansive talks about what it might mean to be lean broadly speaking – and creative and resilient and maybe even equitable – in a changing world. As a conference goer, this multiple threads (all talking to each other) thing is what I’m looking for.

Dean Meyers's insight:

If you are a fan of neat and tidy TED-like or TED-lite conferences, where you are pretty sure of the content or the 18-20 minute format, and would rather network in the hallways more than sit in your seat, the LeanUX NYC conference would definitely be a different experience.

Founded four years ago by Will Evans (@semanticwill) to talk and teach the growing community of designers, developers and startups trying to figure out what Lean means to them more in practice than just in theory, the conference has grown not just in size but in breadth of content and the kinds of attendees.

This latest one, held between April 15 through the 19th, combined an array of speaker covering everything from Ethics to "thinking like a scientist" to the origins of Lean and how to apply it to either innovation or your existing workflow.

Everyone was invited to become an insider, with the over 500 participants building an affinity wall of ideas and topics to discuss at an all-day  about the existing workplace, how to implement the ideas heard at the conference in their enterprise settings, at an all day combined Open Space/Lean Coffee, run by Jim Benson.


I would invite you to go through the graphic recordings I produced for all of the speakers (32 of them, over 3 days), and there's a shot or two of the 2 hour introduction to Graphic Recording I offered as a workshop as well, for those who wanted to try their hand at capturing a talk in large scale visual notes.


The link to the collection of graphic recordings is on Flickr and can be found here : https://www.flickr.com/photos/deanmeyers/sets/72157651622993607. 



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Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic TV

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic TV | VizWorld | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dean Meyers's insight:

Interesting transformation of gaming, from MORP (Massive Online Role Playing) to episodic video games--the biggest factors being the visuals and the size of the playing field. However, it does still depend on engaging storytelling, the invitation to suspend disbelief, and come into the world of the characters on screen.


As episodic TV grew out of episodic radio which grew out of serialized stories in newspapers (look up Charles Dickens, for instance), it's not surprising that harnessing the video tools used in adventure gaming can be used for this mode of gaming.


On to the holodeck!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:55 AM


Calum Marsh:  "Games structured like prestige TV shows present unique difficulties – having to essentially build different games – but also unique opportunities: ‘It’s really cool to be able to react to what your community likes about it as you’re making it’"

Fausto Cantu's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:47 PM

Videojuegos episódicos prueban ser igual de adictivos que los episodios de la tele

James Coombes's curator insight, May 2, 2015 8:08 AM

“Players,” Guilbert concludes, “are looking for something new. They’re tired of playing the same kind of games all the time. What we want to bring them is something different, something slower, more poetic, more nostalgic – something which isn’t so present on the market.”

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Over 50 and Back in College, Preparing for a New Career

Over 50 and Back in College, Preparing for a New Career | VizWorld | Scoop.it

As retirees return to college to prepare for a second degree, continuing education programs changes from an institution's sideline offering to a major opportunity for revenue.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Dean Meyers's insight:

Graphic recording (listed as a visual note-taker in this NY Times article) features in educational instruction for the bottom edge of the boomers looking for new careers.

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How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics

How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Renewed interest comic books can mean good things for your B2B content marketing: You can stand out when you tell compelling stories using this visual medium. Discover the three things every comic must have to engage readers.
Dean Meyers's insight:

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth a read.)

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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 28, 2014 1:43 PM

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth reading in its entiretly.)

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[Weekender] Visual thinking pioneer stresses the power of drawing

[Weekender] Visual thinking pioneer stresses the power of drawing | VizWorld | Scoop.it

On Eun-ju, CEO of Social Frog, a South Korean start-up, was quick to name names that could help explain her specialty: Einstein, Da Vinci, Picasso and Jobs. She told The Korea Herald that she grouped these figures together because they represent the power of drawing. Though how much drawing played a part is arguable, it is widely thought that Einstein used visualization to come up with his theory of relativity....

Dean Meyers's insight:

In this article written by Jeong Hunny (hj257@heraldcorp.com), he notes that, "On likes to think of herself as the Christopher Columbus of visual thinking in Korea."


On's company, Social Frog, aims to “propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


Visual thinking transcends language, culture and generational differences. Considering the amazing amount and quality of technology created and produced in South Korea (Samsung and LG being the first to come to mind), it's good to see that this startup openly focuses on using the "soft skill" of drawing to  "“propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


It would be interesting to see if she develops techniques that be delivered everywhere to help people use visual thinking in every field.



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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 14, 2014 10:28 PM

In this article written by Jeong Hunny (hj257@heraldcorp.com), he notes that, "On likes to think of herself as the Christopher Columbus of visual thinking in Korea."


On's company, Social Frog, aims to “propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


Visual thinking transcends language, culture and generational differences. Considering the amazing amount and quality of technology created and produced in South Korea (Samsung and LG being the first to come to mind), it's good to see that this startup openly focuses on using the "soft skill" of drawing to  "“propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


It would be interesting to see if she develops techniques that be delivered everywhere to help people use visual thinking in every field.

Christopher Malapitan's curator insight, November 18, 2014 5:20 AM

Pushing visual thinking in Asia

 

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3ders.org - Interview with futurist Christopher Barnatt on his book '3D Printing: Second Edition' | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News

3ders.org - Interview with futurist Christopher Barnatt on his book '3D Printing: Second Edition' | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Christopher Barnatt is a well-known 3D printing academic, videographer and pundit. On 7th November, an update of his book called '3D Printing: Second Edition' was published.
Dean Meyers's insight:

For a complete overview of 3D printing, starting with the core  uses, from rapid prototyping through high-end additive technology applications, this book, written in plain english that doesn't talk down to the technologist, designer, maker or engineer, is a "must have" on your shelf. 


Innovation demands visual thinking, and this book can be a valuable resource for thinking about innovation even if you think you'll never produce a 3D object before you start reading the book.

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Ebola outbreaks interactive map released | GISuser.com

Ebola outbreaks interactive map released | GISuser.com | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Ebola outbreaks interactive map released
Dean Meyers's insight:

With a combination of mapping, photography and written editorial content, Esri UK has released an interactive map, detailing the history of the world's Ebola outbreaks, including ones in 2014 in  Dallas, Texas (US) and in Spain.


Click here to access the Ebola Outbreaks map


The map uses the Esri Story map platform, which is a non-code based platform allowing users to build these timeline or geographically-based interactive stories, heavily relying on Esri's mapping libraries while additional content from other sources can be added to enrich the story. 


For more details on how to create your own Story maps, visit the link here:

Six Steps to Publishing Your Story Map

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Mapped: Where do migrants apply for asylum in Europe?

Mapped: Where do migrants apply for asylum in Europe? | VizWorld | Scoop.it
As the European Union welcomes Germany's decision to waive the Dublin Regulation in the case of Syrian asylum seekers, The Telegraph shows readers the distribution of asylum applications across Europe
Dean Meyers's insight:

The Telegraph from the UK has turned numbers into visual attributes of understanding the refugee crisis of the mass exodus and requests for asylum in Europe, predominantly by Syrians and Eritreans in 2014. NOTE: The 2015 numbers are not represented here (certainly not in completion, as we're only in the first days of September at the time of publishing this graphic, with another 3 months to go in the year and no sign of diminishing numbers.


The crisis therefore isn't just for the immigrants looking to escape the devastation of their society and homelands; the countries receiving these people will be facing massive strains on their own resources, from housing to food to transportation and education, right down to the neighborhood level as state governments will have to deal with unexpected (and probably unprecedented) social service needs.


How well chosen to use increasingly darkening shades of a color (Red, here) to show the quantities of people asking for help.

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Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015

Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015 | VizWorld | Scoop.it
36% of adult smartphone owners use messaging apps, while 17% use apps that automatically delete sent messages. These types of apps are adding to an already complex terrain of digital and social communication. Meanwhile, social media platforms continue to attract dedicated users.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Faster bandwidth? Better cameras on handhelds and phones, higher resolution screens on tablets... it's not necessarily any one of those things in particular, or maybe it's just the ease of taking and sharing pictures that's caused the great growth in Pinterest and Instagram.


Visuals are driving more social media platforms (and the advertising that's being seen on them), and even Twitter, while still constrained by 140 characters for text has greater capabilities in managing pictures and video.

 

This research from the Pew Research Center from survey work done in early 2015,  compares mobile messaging usage compared with 2012, stating, 

"Some 31% of online adults use Pinterest (up from 15% in 2012), while 28% use Instagram (up from 13% in 2012)."


If you're working in communications, perhaps you would consider layout and composition (for art and photography) becoming as important as good writing techniques. 

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Documentary Now! | Creative Planet Network

Documentary Now! | Creative Planet Network | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Dean Meyers's insight:

Satire is a wonderful way to pay homage to icons, memes, and other memorable forms, and films are satirized routinely in other films. 


Here is a series from the IFC, which takes on the entire genre of film documentary, written and produced by Saturday Night Live alums Fred Amisen and Bill Hader.


This article, however, goes beyond the writing of the mockumentaries right into the way the material was filmed to imitate (lovingly) old footage and the historic looks that are part of the visual language of these films.


The article serves as both a good read and a lesson in using creativity to recreate the past for both nostagic and comic effect.

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An Introduction to Design Thinking (Part 1)

An Introduction to Design Thinking (Part 1) | VizWorld | Scoop.it
‘Design Thinking’ might just be the next ‘new’ old thing in education.

Via Chris Carter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Dean Meyers's insight:

Design Thinking can be drawn many ways, and here is another graphic representation of a method to put Design Thinking into practice. 


Where is the weak point? Usually in the testing phase: there is an aversion to seeing if a "great idea" is right, because most of the time we believe that all it takes is the great idea, and with enough marketing or spreading the word it will catch on. 


At the heart of Design Thinking is learning, knowing, understanding and serving the customer or user. And that may mean scrapping great ideas, over and over, until your product/service/device actually delights the consumer or user enough to get them to use it.


And testing usually doesn't require more than asking question or, even better, observing. It will separate the "Minimum Viable Product" from the "Minimum Loveable Product".

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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 10, 2015 3:12 PM

Please read both this and the next piece (adjacent).

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Can a Font Make Us Believe Something is True? | AIGA Eye on Design

Can a Font Make Us Believe Something is True? | AIGA Eye on Design | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Errol Morris and Michael Bierut say yes: The writer and director was curious to know if the appearance of letters could sway us to believe something is more or
Dean Meyers's insight:

Here is more evidence that aesthetics carry far greater importance than just determining whether something is beautiful or not.


This article goes to deeper issues: do we trust that which we consider beautiful more than that which is unappealing? Are typefaces reflective of, perhaps, facial expressions which display emotions? Are typefaces even reflections of our own self-recognition? Why would we trust Baskerville so much, a typeface designed in 1757, a pivotal time in the history of western civilization, when both culture and society are on the verge of breaking into newer freedoms, and we are smack in the middle of the age of enlightenment.


So let's fast forward to our current time, when we still depend on reading, yet the standards of size, the use of digital screens over print, and the amount of time given to reading (as compared to even 20 years ago) has diminished so quickly (does anyone remember speed reading courses and books on the best-seller lists in the late 60's?).


If you create any kind of material to be read by others and want to establish your authority,  you are not limited to Helvetica, Arial, Times Roman, or the very limited fonts that dominated the web only 10 years ago.


But is Baskerville your best choice?


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Millennial-Mobile "How-To" Searches Explode On YouTube

Millennial-Mobile "How-To" Searches Explode On YouTube | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Google says that "how-to" searches on YouTube have grown 70 percent year-over-year, adding that “more than 100 million hours of how-to content have been wa
Dean Meyers's insight:

How-To and Explainer videos are popular, that can be taken as an assumption, but knowing that Google searches on YouTube have grown by a specific number (70%) is an infographic-worthy number.


While the top search trends are identified as "Beauty, Cooking and Home" that doesn't mean that more sophisticated or complicated products and services aren't also seeing an increase. 


The "test before you by" idea, which may not be so easy when shopping more frequently online and not having the ability to put your hands on the item, test drive a vehicle, or understand some of the more complicated processes to use  a new piece of software effectively, is, in some cases, satisfied with a well scripted and well executed video.


Rather than just creating a traditional advertising spot, but showing how to use products and services, or using animation to explain how to do something with a particular product can create a much stronger and memorable impression than repeating a 30-second commercial on legacy television programming.


This post is directed towards marketers, and I believe it takes a bit of a surface approach, talking about adding titles and tagging for search engine optimization, and only says " Create I-want-to-do content", without deeper information on what that means. Clearly, a "how-to" video would be helpful here!


The more important point is realizing that you may be able to create brand or product enthusiasts or overcome resistance to trying something new in your product or service with an engaging, informative explainer video. 


The unsaid news is that the bandwidth and reach is there, and marketers should take advantage of the critical mass and the number of searches that make it worth approaching marketing through storytelling that explains how to use your product.

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LukeW | There Is No Fold

LukeW | There Is No Fold | VizWorld | Scoop.it
LukeW Ideation + Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design.

Via yannick grenzinger
Dean Meyers's insight:

Web design keeps evolving as devices, audience and time and place of accessing the web changes.


Mobile rules now, as it's imperative to think about your viewer as being anywhere, anytime, and probably holding something with a screen in their hand first.


That means "SCROLLING" is the most important navigational function and gesture you will have to consider when planning form and function for your site.


This article lays out clear information where and how people navigate through websites, and the verdict is in: designers do not need to make decisions on placement of content based on what is "above the fold" any more. Vertical scrolling is now a very natural action of using websites, and it's more important to place CALL TO ACTION interaction points (buttons, links) next to relevant content rather than forcing their position to "above the fold".


Read the full article for more.

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From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC « Adobe Creative Cloud

From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC « Adobe Creative Cloud | VizWorld | Scoop.it
News and updates from the product team
Dean Meyers's insight:

A new addition to the Adobe Creative Cloud collection, which doesn't seem to show in my Adobe Creative Cloud Desktop Apps management.


This is an iPad app, so don't look for it on your Android device or your Surface Pro. 


Falling somewhere between the Adobe Ink app and the "junior" iPad versions of Photoshop, it has a niche feeling to it, and might not appeal to UX/UI designers who want more of a sketching app, or are devoted to Omnigraffle or Axure.


It's getting good reviews from the App Store, I wonder how deeply it will penetrate into the webdev world.


Even in the article, Adobe says they "have to listen to feedback..." will it be worth it to add functionality, and so forth, or just make it a gateway tool back to the full-throttle design tools that live in a less  in-the-moment platform?

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A look at the PowerVR graphics architecture: Tile-based rendering

A look at the PowerVR graphics architecture: Tile-based rendering | VizWorld | Scoop.it
I’m fond of telling the story about why I joined Imagination.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Smaller form factors (laptops, tablets, phablets) vs more sophisticated graphic manipulation and generation...and, oh, yes, will it come in 2K, 4K...?


Pushing technology isn't just in the hardware, it's in the approach as well. 


Here's an in-depth article about rendering that may provide an answer for both more fantastic AND more realistic graphic effects, particularly for gaming and other high-demand applications.

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How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics

How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Renewed interest comic books can mean good things for your B2B content marketing: You can stand out when you tell compelling stories using this visual medium. Discover the three things every comic must have to engage readers.
Dean Meyers's insight:

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth reading in its entiretly.)

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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 29, 2014 10:40 AM

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth a read.)

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Your Long Wait For A (Two-Second) Longer Vine Video Is Over

Your Long Wait For A (Two-Second) Longer Vine Video Is Over | VizWorld | Scoop.it
When 6 seconds is too short and 15 seconds is too long.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Ocho's co-founder Jourdan Urbach says research indicates the average person's attention span is eight seconds long... therefore, Ocho offers eight-second videos that run on their own social network, all for iOS users.


But there's more: you can actually upload longer footage, and then apply a timelapse tool to sqeeze your visual story back into the 8-second slot. You can also give it that Instagram feeling with filters, and just for good measure, practice your studio voice by recording voice overs to finish off the edit.


Commenting is apparently video only, but if you love texting, you can #hashtag or tag other users.


Android users will just have to wait for the extra 2 seconds... or stick with Instagram.

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Discovery and Caption Editing on Instagram

Discovery and Caption Editing on Instagram | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Today, we’re pleased to announce a bundle of updates and improvements designed to help you discover more on Instagram.
In this update, we’re continuing to improve the Explore page on Instagram by...
Dean Meyers's insight:

Do little things matter? Certainly when it comes to a favorite social media platform! Have you been frustrated by not being able to fix that clever caption? Want to stumble through and discover great images and videos with a better idea of who's behind it? 


Instagram has bundles a group of updates to improve findability, editing, and straightforward navigation, by adding tabs and labels on their Explore page and fixing those crazy spelling errors that have been locked for ever once you've add your original caption.


You can find out more of the specifics at help.instagram.com. Or just open Instagram and play--who needs a manual anyway?



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