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Google Earth Tour Builder lets you tell stories through maps

Google Earth Tour Builder lets you tell stories through maps | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Google has used Earth and Maps to tell tales of unfolding tragedies and soldiers fighting for our country. Now its opening up those tools to the public,

Via José Carlos
Dean Meyers's insight:

It seems that mapping, as a storytelling tool, is becoming extremely popular, with new sets and tools opening every day (see my post yesterday on www.vizworld.com about CartoDB.com updating their mapping tools with new capabilities and free subscriptions). 

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More video! More mobile! More drones! Mary Meeker's 2015 Internet Trends report

More video! More mobile! More drones! Mary Meeker's 2015 Internet Trends report | VizWorld | Scoop.it

Mary Meeker's annual Internet Trends (2015 edition) has been released as a 157-slide deck, and I went through it last night. It's all about Millennials, we love drones (but not for Amazon Prime deliveries), freelance work abounds, and everyone has a device in their hands with terrific visuals and loads of video. But there's more...!

Dean Meyers's insight:

No mention of the government sector, what happened to the cloud, 3D, gaming, VR? 157 pages of charts and tables, and much deep and rich info, some following past trends (the shrinkage of print, and the shrinkage of marketing dollars going to print, which is no surprise), the growth of the China Internet market, followed by India (and where is Brazil?).

A few pages dedicated to business and industry's potential use of drones is a little surprising, perhaps. BYOD use by millennials, not so much, and millennials get much coverage, particularly in what they want/expect from traditional workplaces. You might get comfort in having your thoughts reinforced or verified, but it's truly a deep document with a good overview of the commercial internet, with what I perceive as a strong slant towards the marketer's point of view.

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Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat - Committee to Protect Journalists

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat - Committee to Protect Journalists | VizWorld | Scoop.it
On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around...
Dean Meyers's insight:

Pictures are worth more than 1,000 words: they are worth at least 14 lives, in the case of the killings over the publication of a cartoon in the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.


Cartoons have been used to share political messages at least as far back as the French Revolution; the grotesque images from Goya in his series, Los desastres de la guerra from the early 1800's, and carried as editorial features in major newspapers throughout the world throughout the 20th century.


The article linked here is from the Committee to Protect Journalists an independent, nonprofit organization that promotes press freedom worldwide.


This article exposes how political cartoonists, now using social media to share their images, are facing not only violence from religious and political extremists but arrests and prison sentences in their own countries when their governments feel under attack or made vulnerable by a cartoonist's pictorial excoriation or exposure of wrongdoing.


In an age when memes are easy to create to poke fun at what may be obvious truths by quickly marrying a picture to a snappy line of text, it's easy to take for granted both how powerful the old-fashioned cartoon can be. Behind the simplicity and association with comic strips and superhero stories is the power of the cartoonist's singular voice, whether in pen and ink or drawn on a digital tablet, daring to speak openly.


Whether you agree or not with the content, and even if you don't like the aesthetic of a simple drawing of a stick figure with uneven, handwritten text, cartoonists, and most particularly cartoonists who choose to tell stories with political, social or even religious stories, make targets of themselves as soon as they share their images.


The committee to Protect Journalists recognizes that because of the great power of the image, cartoonists who choose political journalism as their field of work are now facing persecution, restrictions and prison from their own governments. Even their publishers are  under attack.


Worth a 1,000 word? Far more than that.

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Radical Recombinations | LEANUX NYC

Radical Recombinations | LEANUX NYC | VizWorld | Scoop.it

A lot of folks tweeted that their brain hurt during #LeanUX15 last week in Brooklyn. My brain mostly just lit up, I thought I was ok, but then around Sunday or Monday mine started to hurt, too… for days. There was just so much to digest. Which is what made it hard to blog. So I decided not to blog much and to reflect.

I keep coming back to LeanUX NYC because it feels designed to share not just learning about lean ideas, but lean learning in context, in response to the kinds of problems we find ourselves experiencing in organizations and larger society now. This year there were information-packed talks about lean ideas (whether under the banner of Lean, Agile/Scrum, Lean Startup, and/or Design Thinking) and then super expansive talks about what it might mean to be lean broadly speaking – and creative and resilient and maybe even equitable – in a changing world. As a conference goer, this multiple threads (all talking to each other) thing is what I’m looking for.

Dean Meyers's insight:

If you are a fan of neat and tidy TED-like or TED-lite conferences, where you are pretty sure of the content or the 18-20 minute format, and would rather network in the hallways more than sit in your seat, the LeanUX NYC conference would definitely be a different experience.

Founded four years ago by Will Evans (@semanticwill) to talk and teach the growing community of designers, developers and startups trying to figure out what Lean means to them more in practice than just in theory, the conference has grown not just in size but in breadth of content and the kinds of attendees.

This latest one, held between April 15 through the 19th, combined an array of speaker covering everything from Ethics to "thinking like a scientist" to the origins of Lean and how to apply it to either innovation or your existing workflow.

Everyone was invited to become an insider, with the over 500 participants building an affinity wall of ideas and topics to discuss at an all-day  about the existing workplace, how to implement the ideas heard at the conference in their enterprise settings, at an all day combined Open Space/Lean Coffee, run by Jim Benson.


I would invite you to go through the graphic recordings I produced for all of the speakers (32 of them, over 3 days), and there's a shot or two of the 2 hour introduction to Graphic Recording I offered as a workshop as well, for those who wanted to try their hand at capturing a talk in large scale visual notes.


The link to the collection of graphic recordings is on Flickr and can be found here : https://www.flickr.com/photos/deanmeyers/sets/72157651622993607. 



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Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic TV

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic TV | VizWorld | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dean Meyers's insight:

Interesting transformation of gaming, from MORP (Massive Online Role Playing) to episodic video games--the biggest factors being the visuals and the size of the playing field. However, it does still depend on engaging storytelling, the invitation to suspend disbelief, and come into the world of the characters on screen.


As episodic TV grew out of episodic radio which grew out of serialized stories in newspapers (look up Charles Dickens, for instance), it's not surprising that harnessing the video tools used in adventure gaming can be used for this mode of gaming.


On to the holodeck!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 29, 6:55 AM


Calum Marsh:  "Games structured like prestige TV shows present unique difficulties – having to essentially build different games – but also unique opportunities: ‘It’s really cool to be able to react to what your community likes about it as you’re making it’"

Fausto Cantu's curator insight, April 29, 6:47 PM

Videojuegos episódicos prueban ser igual de adictivos que los episodios de la tele

James Coombes's curator insight, May 2, 8:08 AM

“Players,” Guilbert concludes, “are looking for something new. They’re tired of playing the same kind of games all the time. What we want to bring them is something different, something slower, more poetic, more nostalgic – something which isn’t so present on the market.”

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Over 50 and Back in College, Preparing for a New Career

Over 50 and Back in College, Preparing for a New Career | VizWorld | Scoop.it

As retirees return to college to prepare for a second degree, continuing education programs changes from an institution's sideline offering to a major opportunity for revenue.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Dean Meyers's insight:

Graphic recording (listed as a visual note-taker in this NY Times article) features in educational instruction for the bottom edge of the boomers looking for new careers.

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How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics

How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Renewed interest comic books can mean good things for your B2B content marketing: You can stand out when you tell compelling stories using this visual medium. Discover the three things every comic must have to engage readers.
Dean Meyers's insight:

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth a read.)

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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 28, 2014 1:43 PM

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth reading in its entiretly.)

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[Weekender] Visual thinking pioneer stresses the power of drawing

[Weekender] Visual thinking pioneer stresses the power of drawing | VizWorld | Scoop.it

On Eun-ju, CEO of Social Frog, a South Korean start-up, was quick to name names that could help explain her specialty: Einstein, Da Vinci, Picasso and Jobs. She told The Korea Herald that she grouped these figures together because they represent the power of drawing. Though how much drawing played a part is arguable, it is widely thought that Einstein used visualization to come up with his theory of relativity....

Dean Meyers's insight:

In this article written by Jeong Hunny (hj257@heraldcorp.com), he notes that, "On likes to think of herself as the Christopher Columbus of visual thinking in Korea."


On's company, Social Frog, aims to “propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


Visual thinking transcends language, culture and generational differences. Considering the amazing amount and quality of technology created and produced in South Korea (Samsung and LG being the first to come to mind), it's good to see that this startup openly focuses on using the "soft skill" of drawing to  "“propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


It would be interesting to see if she develops techniques that be delivered everywhere to help people use visual thinking in every field.



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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 14, 2014 10:28 PM

In this article written by Jeong Hunny (hj257@heraldcorp.com), he notes that, "On likes to think of herself as the Christopher Columbus of visual thinking in Korea."


On's company, Social Frog, aims to “propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


Visual thinking transcends language, culture and generational differences. Considering the amazing amount and quality of technology created and produced in South Korea (Samsung and LG being the first to come to mind), it's good to see that this startup openly focuses on using the "soft skill" of drawing to  "“propagate the hidden wisdom” in visual thinking across Korea, offering classes in visual thinking in schools, corporations and other individual members interested in the much-coveted skills in the age of digital convergence and creativity-led business startups. 


It would be interesting to see if she develops techniques that be delivered everywhere to help people use visual thinking in every field.

Christopher Malapitan's curator insight, November 18, 2014 5:20 AM

Pushing visual thinking in Asia

 

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3ders.org - Interview with futurist Christopher Barnatt on his book '3D Printing: Second Edition' | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News

3ders.org - Interview with futurist Christopher Barnatt on his book '3D Printing: Second Edition' | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Christopher Barnatt is a well-known 3D printing academic, videographer and pundit. On 7th November, an update of his book called '3D Printing: Second Edition' was published.
Dean Meyers's insight:

For a complete overview of 3D printing, starting with the core  uses, from rapid prototyping through high-end additive technology applications, this book, written in plain english that doesn't talk down to the technologist, designer, maker or engineer, is a "must have" on your shelf. 


Innovation demands visual thinking, and this book can be a valuable resource for thinking about innovation even if you think you'll never produce a 3D object before you start reading the book.

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Ebola outbreaks interactive map released | GISuser.com

Ebola outbreaks interactive map released | GISuser.com | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Ebola outbreaks interactive map released
Dean Meyers's insight:

With a combination of mapping, photography and written editorial content, Esri UK has released an interactive map, detailing the history of the world's Ebola outbreaks, including ones in 2014 in  Dallas, Texas (US) and in Spain.


Click here to access the Ebola Outbreaks map


The map uses the Esri Story map platform, which is a non-code based platform allowing users to build these timeline or geographically-based interactive stories, heavily relying on Esri's mapping libraries while additional content from other sources can be added to enrich the story. 


For more details on how to create your own Story maps, visit the link here:

Six Steps to Publishing Your Story Map

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Six fresh ideas for news design from a #SNDMakes designathon

Six fresh ideas for news design from a #SNDMakes designathon | VizWorld | Scoop.it
New media and legacy media came together at the second weekend-long "hackathon" hosted by the Society for News Design.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Nieman Lab reports this as more of a "designathon" rather than a hackathon, where about 40 attendees from stalwarts of traditional media (Boston Globe, ESPN, Washington Post, New York Times) and new media groups (Vox Media and Slate) came to the Society for News Design's #SNDMakes Boston to prototype a news product over the weekend.


SND's intent is "providing a vehicle to facilitate discussions about real problems all news organizations face," according to SND digital director Kyle Ellis.


Six teams were formed, and came up with interesting concepts, all strongly journalist/publisher focused. By this I mean that users (consumers of news) aren't forgotten, but for example, one of the teams created a search tool for journalists called Anglr that helps to identify a unique perspective on a story by searching keywords in Google News, Twitter and Facebook social rankings for the results and related keywords. 


Other concepts coming from other teams included creating more flexible homepage design (Hmpgr), making fact-checking processes more integrated into a journalist's workflow (Legit), and a tool called Pre-Post that could become a standalone tool that would allow content creators and editors to check how their content would look or be seen on a wide variety of platforms, from CMS to Twitter to Facebook.


All of the projects take into account the mutiple platforms, services and devices that are used for finding, sourcing, creating, publishing and distributing news. There was even one team thinking about audio first, as in podcasts or audio stories, and how they could be made more visually stimulating.


While the goal wasn't to build prototypes meant to go into production, some of these may have life after the weekend, or become incorporated into a news site you might read... or listen to.


How you look at news, and how news looks to you, is being thought about by the new generation of journalists who directly use the technology that previous generations of journalists would never touch. Hackathons for news design should become a regular event, all over the world.

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Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Why Do We Need Data Science when We’ve Had Statistics for Centuries?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Why Do We Need Data Science when We’ve Had Statistics for Centuries? | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Data Science is emerging as as one of the hottest new professions and academic disciplines in these early years of the 21st century. A number of articles have noted that the demand for data scientists is racing ahead of supply....
Dean Meyers's insight:

Understanding of predictive analytics, potential subject matter expertise, a curious nature and a healthy dose of coding skills would seem to be part of the requirements for becoming a Data Scientist. Irving Wladawsky-Berger's post, which includes some autobiography on his own career trajectory, attempts to clarify what this new discipline means.


I would say that it's the combination of skills, knowledge, and interest in exploration that would make a successful Data Scientist. The first two qualities can be gained through study and practice. The last, I believe, would come from the nature of the individual.


I'd also like to posit that this description might fit the title of Data Journalist, to a certain degree. In new programs showing up at universities (such as the Beekman Center in Harvard) there is a lot of coding, photography and video making, and massaging of big data going on to produce a next generation of journalists.


All told, many new fields are opening for curious people who are looking for answers, all kinds of answers, whether for social good, better communication, scientific and medical solutions, or artistic expression.


The explosion of readily available technology, data, and visualization tools has created new fields of study, arts, crafts and science.


Being a "rocket scientist" became sexy about two generations ago; perhaps being a "data scientist", or even better, a "data visualization scientist" might become the next great profession.



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Pinterest is courting an audience of professional designers with its latest acquisition

Pinterest is courting an audience of professional designers with its latest acquisition | VizWorld | Scoop.it

Pinterest is acquiring visual organization tool Icebergs. Pinterest will discontinue the Icebergs service in September, according to Icebergs’ website.

Dean Meyers's insight:

Will this make Adobe concerned about building Behance's network? Or suggest a re-design to their site and community?


I think not. Designers will have an opportunity to participate in multiple communities. Let the culture shake out who decides to spend the most time in one or the other, and let's see if Pinterest will turn its curating platform even more directly into a marketing platform through this acquisition.

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Autodesk acquires NYC design studio The Living

Autodesk acquires NYC design studio The Living | VizWorld | Scoop.it
High tech meets green in projects like having mussels “vocalize” changes in water quality.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Autodesk is bigger than you think...and not the only company in the graphics/design/cad/animation/3D space with big reach, wide reach, and big ideas that have threads that link together.


The interesting choice is finding a company that seems to have a good grasp on Biomimicry, along with 3D printing and robotics.


Read the article, and tell us what you think...

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Can a Font Make Us Believe Something is True? | AIGA Eye on Design

Can a Font Make Us Believe Something is True? | AIGA Eye on Design | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Errol Morris and Michael Bierut say yes: The writer and director was curious to know if the appearance of letters could sway us to believe something is more or
Dean Meyers's insight:

Here is more evidence that aesthetics carry far greater importance than just determining whether something is beautiful or not.


This article goes to deeper issues: do we trust that which we consider beautiful more than that which is unappealing? Are typefaces reflective of, perhaps, facial expressions which display emotions? Are typefaces even reflections of our own self-recognition? Why would we trust Baskerville so much, a typeface designed in 1757, a pivotal time in the history of western civilization, when both culture and society are on the verge of breaking into newer freedoms, and we are smack in the middle of the age of enlightenment.


So let's fast forward to our current time, when we still depend on reading, yet the standards of size, the use of digital screens over print, and the amount of time given to reading (as compared to even 20 years ago) has diminished so quickly (does anyone remember speed reading courses and books on the best-seller lists in the late 60's?).


If you create any kind of material to be read by others and want to establish your authority,  you are not limited to Helvetica, Arial, Times Roman, or the very limited fonts that dominated the web only 10 years ago.


But is Baskerville your best choice?


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Millennial-Mobile "How-To" Searches Explode On YouTube

Millennial-Mobile "How-To" Searches Explode On YouTube | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Google says that "how-to" searches on YouTube have grown 70 percent year-over-year, adding that “more than 100 million hours of how-to content have been wa
Dean Meyers's insight:

How-To and Explainer videos are popular, that can be taken as an assumption, but knowing that Google searches on YouTube have grown by a specific number (70%) is an infographic-worthy number.


While the top search trends are identified as "Beauty, Cooking and Home" that doesn't mean that more sophisticated or complicated products and services aren't also seeing an increase. 


The "test before you by" idea, which may not be so easy when shopping more frequently online and not having the ability to put your hands on the item, test drive a vehicle, or understand some of the more complicated processes to use  a new piece of software effectively, is, in some cases, satisfied with a well scripted and well executed video.


Rather than just creating a traditional advertising spot, but showing how to use products and services, or using animation to explain how to do something with a particular product can create a much stronger and memorable impression than repeating a 30-second commercial on legacy television programming.


This post is directed towards marketers, and I believe it takes a bit of a surface approach, talking about adding titles and tagging for search engine optimization, and only says " Create I-want-to-do content", without deeper information on what that means. Clearly, a "how-to" video would be helpful here!


The more important point is realizing that you may be able to create brand or product enthusiasts or overcome resistance to trying something new in your product or service with an engaging, informative explainer video. 


The unsaid news is that the bandwidth and reach is there, and marketers should take advantage of the critical mass and the number of searches that make it worth approaching marketing through storytelling that explains how to use your product.

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LukeW | There Is No Fold

LukeW | There Is No Fold | VizWorld | Scoop.it
LukeW Ideation + Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design.

Via yannick grenzinger
Dean Meyers's insight:

Web design keeps evolving as devices, audience and time and place of accessing the web changes.


Mobile rules now, as it's imperative to think about your viewer as being anywhere, anytime, and probably holding something with a screen in their hand first.


That means "SCROLLING" is the most important navigational function and gesture you will have to consider when planning form and function for your site.


This article lays out clear information where and how people navigate through websites, and the verdict is in: designers do not need to make decisions on placement of content based on what is "above the fold" any more. Vertical scrolling is now a very natural action of using websites, and it's more important to place CALL TO ACTION interaction points (buttons, links) next to relevant content rather than forcing their position to "above the fold".


Read the full article for more.

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From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC « Adobe Creative Cloud

From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC « Adobe Creative Cloud | VizWorld | Scoop.it
News and updates from the product team
Dean Meyers's insight:

A new addition to the Adobe Creative Cloud collection, which doesn't seem to show in my Adobe Creative Cloud Desktop Apps management.


This is an iPad app, so don't look for it on your Android device or your Surface Pro. 


Falling somewhere between the Adobe Ink app and the "junior" iPad versions of Photoshop, it has a niche feeling to it, and might not appeal to UX/UI designers who want more of a sketching app, or are devoted to Omnigraffle or Axure.


It's getting good reviews from the App Store, I wonder how deeply it will penetrate into the webdev world.


Even in the article, Adobe says they "have to listen to feedback..." will it be worth it to add functionality, and so forth, or just make it a gateway tool back to the full-throttle design tools that live in a less  in-the-moment platform?

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A look at the PowerVR graphics architecture: Tile-based rendering

A look at the PowerVR graphics architecture: Tile-based rendering | VizWorld | Scoop.it
I’m fond of telling the story about why I joined Imagination.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Smaller form factors (laptops, tablets, phablets) vs more sophisticated graphic manipulation and generation...and, oh, yes, will it come in 2K, 4K...?


Pushing technology isn't just in the hardware, it's in the approach as well. 


Here's an in-depth article about rendering that may provide an answer for both more fantastic AND more realistic graphic effects, particularly for gaming and other high-demand applications.

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How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics

How to Tell a Compelling B2B Story Using Comics | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Renewed interest comic books can mean good things for your B2B content marketing: You can stand out when you tell compelling stories using this visual medium. Discover the three things every comic must have to engage readers.
Dean Meyers's insight:

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth reading in its entiretly.)

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Dean Meyers's curator insight, November 29, 2014 10:40 AM

The article quoted here wisely says that not making a comic strip or book about your company or products as superheroes, but rather portraying real people in real situations, though in this heightened and stylized visual format, can have great impact on potential customers.


Sequential art (comics and cartoons) may be best thought of as about archetypes, but using the frame-by-frame unfolding of a story, adding suspense, success over challenges, and creation of human connection and bonds is the greater, more effective use of this idea.


Single panel cartoons can have an element of surprise or humor. Serial stories with "cliffhanger" non-endings to a set of panels can make the reader want to know more, to go deeper into discovery about your company or products.


There are many ways to tell a story, but, as with theater, one of the most powerful features of using a comic/cartoon format is that readers are willing to suspend disbelief to find out what's going on in this drawing--even when drawn with stick figures or cleverly child-like, as the Peanuts cartoon strip was drawn from it's beginnings.


Comics and cartoons are about possibilities, about "what if?" scenarios, played out very safely, and communicable so easily across many media.


Even B2B can be reached (without seeming condescending) with a simply drawn yet powerfully told story, through comics.


(NOTE: it's great to see a graphic recording about storytelling by @kellykingman included in the article, for that alone it's worth a read.)

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Your Long Wait For A (Two-Second) Longer Vine Video Is Over

Your Long Wait For A (Two-Second) Longer Vine Video Is Over | VizWorld | Scoop.it
When 6 seconds is too short and 15 seconds is too long.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Ocho's co-founder Jourdan Urbach says research indicates the average person's attention span is eight seconds long... therefore, Ocho offers eight-second videos that run on their own social network, all for iOS users.


But there's more: you can actually upload longer footage, and then apply a timelapse tool to sqeeze your visual story back into the 8-second slot. You can also give it that Instagram feeling with filters, and just for good measure, practice your studio voice by recording voice overs to finish off the edit.


Commenting is apparently video only, but if you love texting, you can #hashtag or tag other users.


Android users will just have to wait for the extra 2 seconds... or stick with Instagram.

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Discovery and Caption Editing on Instagram

Discovery and Caption Editing on Instagram | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Today, we’re pleased to announce a bundle of updates and improvements designed to help you discover more on Instagram.
In this update, we’re continuing to improve the Explore page on Instagram by...
Dean Meyers's insight:

Do little things matter? Certainly when it comes to a favorite social media platform! Have you been frustrated by not being able to fix that clever caption? Want to stumble through and discover great images and videos with a better idea of who's behind it? 


Instagram has bundles a group of updates to improve findability, editing, and straightforward navigation, by adding tabs and labels on their Explore page and fixing those crazy spelling errors that have been locked for ever once you've add your original caption.


You can find out more of the specifics at help.instagram.com. Or just open Instagram and play--who needs a manual anyway?



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3T produces Pure Copper Heat Exchanger using metal 3D Printing

3T produces Pure Copper Heat Exchanger using metal 3D Printing | VizWorld | Scoop.it
3T produces Pure Copper Heat Exchanger using metal 3D Printing
Dean Meyers's insight:

This is reportedly the first pure copper part created through 3D printing using the Direct Metal Laser Sintering technology (additive manufacturing), created by the Research and Development team at 3T RPD , based in the UK.


The part illustrated is a concept heat exchanger: imagine pipes within pipes created through 3Dprinting to conduct heat/cool, using copper. Copper has traditionally been used in the last century for it's electrical conductivity; imagine prototyping with copper in 3D printed parts.


Copper, as a soft metal, has unique challenges in this process, and 3T is reporting that there is more to go in terms of the surface finish and material properties to get from the beta material stage to the fully functional production-ready material.


But to move this process forward, 3T's R+D manager, Dr. Mark Beard is inviting engineers working with copper components that might benefit from additive manufacture to become a develpment partner.


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Data Visualization for Optimization and Lightweighting

Data Visualization for Optimization and Lightweighting | VizWorld | Scoop.it
The use of simulation in engineering is shifting from sequential (one at a time) to parallel (ma...
Dean Meyers's insight:

Kenneth Wong reports on simulation in engineering, which is now shifting into a parallel process (creating many versions), thanks to the use of high-performance computing systems and "lightweighting", which he says requires "evaluating a  series of design options or families of designs to identify the best candidates". 


Turning Design Thinking and Agile into visible results, and when the MVP can be chosen from a host of possibilities (this goes beyond A/B testing into testing many options, if you so choose), you need a lot of processing power AND the computational tools that can handle it. 


He mentions a handful of programs meant to do that, but focuses mainly on Origin (from OriginLab), which is used heavily in research institutions and has over 100 types of built in graphs, plotting numbers as ternary surfaces (see this Wikipedia reference to response surface methodology), and the higher-end version, OriginPro with advanced statistical handling.



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Little Women of YouTube: Ryerson students create new interactive web series

Little Women of YouTube: Ryerson students create new interactive web series | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Classic gets a digital treatment and brings characters to life in interactive webseries
Dean Meyers's insight:

Louisa May Alcott's story, written as a serial published in newsprint before it become the book we are familiar with, get's a transmedia makeover, called "The March Family Letters" 


How fitting that it comes from women exploring storytelling in new forms, as did Alcott in her day.


The YouTube Q&A videos for MFL (March Family Letters) can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/marchfamilyletters and currently has nearly 1000 subscribers, anticipating the December release of the series.

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Comics, Dataviz, and a More Authentic Transmedia: The Ethics of Transmedia Fatigue

Comics, Dataviz, and a More Authentic Transmedia: The Ethics of Transmedia Fatigue | VizWorld | Scoop.it
Sometimes, as Stuart Moore writes in Wolverine: Under the Boardwalk, you just gotta disappear.
Dean Meyers's insight:

Where does cyber security analysis connect to comics? Article author shathley Q (@uuizardry on Twitter), in his attempt to step away from ComicCon, apparently stepped right back into the world of comics while watching a TEDx talk by cyber security analyst Cris Domas.


Domas, overwhelmed at looking through the massive quantities of binary code, discovered that the visual patterns this non-visual data creates could  surface regular patterns...images... shapes.. 


Furthermore, like comics, which depends on images that build on everything from visual symbols to symbolic (iconographic) imagery, it's possible to use the "sequential" side of the sequential art to further understand and recognize patterns, particularly, for the case of security, where regular, or expected patterns are broken. 


Shathley Q may, in this article, want to step back a little from comics, but the ethos seems to be everywhere he looks. As should we.

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