Vitamin E
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Fat-Soluble Vitamins: A, D, E, and K

Small amounts of vitamins A, D, E and K are needed to maintain good health. Foods that contain these vitamins will not lose them when cooked. The body does not need these every day and stores them in the liver when not used.
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Vitamin E Deficiency

Vitamin E deficiency is rare. Cases of vitamin E deficiency usually only occur in premature infants and in those unable to absorb fats. Since vegetable oils are good sources of vitamin E, people who excessively reduce their total dietary fat may not get enough vitamin E.

 

Too much Vitamin E-- Toxicity 

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for vitamin E is shown in Table 2. Vitamin E obtained from food usually does not pose a risk for toxicity. Supplemental vitamin E is not recommended due to lack of evidence supporting any added health benefits. Megadoses of supplemental vitamin E may pose a hazard to people taking blood-thinning medications such as Coumadin (also known as warfarin) and those on statin drugs.

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Eye Like To Eat: Roasted Tomato & Butternut Squash Soup |

Eye Like To Eat: Roasted Tomato & Butternut Squash Soup | | Vitamin E | Scoop.it
Sandra Young's Visionary Kitchen is now hot off the printing press. It was available in the Biosyntrx. Roasted Tomato & Butternut Squash Soup
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259 kcal 6 gm dietary fiber 8 gm protein 9 gm fat 117 mg omega-3
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Selenium, Vitamin E and Cancer

http://www.ihealthtube.com A 1996 study showed the effect of Selenium and Vitamin E fighting against certain cancers. Pharmacist Max Motyka goes over highlig...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Vitamin E Nutrition - Nutrition, Function, Side Effects - NY Times Health Information

Free reference information from The NY Times on nutrition sources, function, side effects and recommendations, as well as links to related news and features.
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Food Sources:

The best way to get the daily requirement of vitamin E is by eating food sources. Vitamin E is found in the following foods:

 

Vegetable oils (such as wheat germ, sunflower, safflower, corn, and soybean oils) Nuts (such as almonds, peanuts, and hazelnuts/filberts)

Seeds (such as sunflower seeds)

Green leafy vegetables (such as spinach and broccoli)

Fortified breakfast cereals, fruit juices, margarine, and spreads. Check the Nutrition Fact Panel on the food label to find out if the item is fortified

Products made from these foods, such as margarine, also contain vitamin E.

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Vitamin E — Health Professional Fact Sheet

Vitamin E — Health Professional Fact Sheet | Vitamin E | Scoop.it
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Vitamin E is found naturally in some foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. "Vitamin E" is the collective name for a group of fat-soluble compounds with distinctive antioxidant activities

 

 

*Look at RDA chart 

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image_vit-e-rich-foods.jpg (3648x2736 pixels)

image_vit-e-rich-foods.jpg (3648x2736 pixels) | Vitamin E | Scoop.it
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Vitamin E food sources
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Vitamin E

Vitamin E | Vitamin E | Scoop.it
Gabby Goldach, Ariana Kulinczenko: two Miami University students studying Nutrition. 's insight:
Function Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects body tissue from damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals can harm cells, tissues, and organs. - Vitamin E helps keep the immune system strong against viruses and bacteria. - Vitamin E is also important in the formation of red blood cells and it helps the body use vitamin K. It also helps widen blood vessels and keep blood from clotting inside them. - Cells use vitamin E to interact with each other and carry out many important functions.
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