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visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
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Wanted: A Typographic Map of the World | Co.Design

Wanted: A Typographic Map of the World | Co.Design | visual data | Scoop.it

Chicago designer Nancy McCabe creates gorgeous maps of the world using (almost) nothing but words.
We love globes, but we despise reading them. All those extraneous symbols and endless topographic lines that could easily be confused with countries -- if not for Where in the World Is Carmen San Diego, we'd probably go on thinking Dar es Salaam is an island in Norway.

The global maps shown here are a promising antidote. Created by Chicago designer Nancy McCabe, they strip down the geography of the world to virtually nothing but words. Focus on a single continent and you can scan its vast array of nations, cities, and seas without the usual surfeit of visual interference. Blind grids shows latitude and longitude, keeping the whole thing from feeling too obscure and unmap-like.

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Animation: Word as Image

Challenge! Create an image out of a word, using only the letters in the word itself. Use only the graphic elements of the letters without adding outside parts.


Via Andrea Zeitz
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A Visual Thesaurus of the English Language

A Visual Thesaurus of the English Language | visual data | Scoop.it

One of the very first examples of visualization that succeeds in merging beauty with function is Visual Thesaurus, a subscription-based online thesaurus and dictionary that shows the relationships between words through a beautiful interactive map.

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Data Visualization (or why pretty pictures matter)

Data Visualization (or why pretty pictures matter) | visual data | Scoop.it

Numbers are useful if they communicate important ideas and actionable concepts. They are useless if they meaninglessly clutter the field of information.

As an analyst, it’s not enough to simply pull out of the data the 15 or 20 most important numbers that that will make a difference for our client, we also need to convey that information in a way that’s as easy to process as possible.The human brain instinctively sizes up the green part of a pie chart and sees it is bigger than the red part of the pie chart faster and on a deeper level than it processes that 45% is larger than 28%. It’s why we plot trend numbers on a line graph rather than a row. The use of colors and shapes reinforce the points being made by the numbers, and the methods used to show the data increase the ease of absorption among your viewers, and consequently its impact.

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The world of Wikipedia's languages mapped

The world of Wikipedia's languages mapped | visual data | Scoop.it
What happens if you map every geotagged Wikipedia article - and then analyse it for language use?

Mark Graham and the team at the Oxford Internet Institute (who've mapped zombies and every geotagged picture on Flickr) decided to find out as part of their research into the state of the internet - and then break it down by different languages.

Graham, who also runs the blogs floatingsheep.org and zerogeography.net looked at Wikipedia in the Middle East, North Africa, and East Africa in the November 2011 versions of the Arabic, Egyptian Arabic, English, French.

Each one of the yellow dots represents the "human effort that has gone into describing some aspect of a place".

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Word Clouds Considered Harmful

Word Clouds Considered Harmful | visual data | Scoop.it
The New York Times senior software architect would like the newest "mullets of the Internet" to go back from whence they came.

So what’s so wrong with word clouds, anyway? To understand that, it helps to understand the principles we strive for in data journalism. At The New York Times, we strongly believe that visualization is reporting, with many of the same elements that would make a traditional story effective: a narrative that pares away extraneous information to find a story in the data; context to help the reader understand the basics of the subject; interviewing the data to find its flaws and be sure of our conclusions.

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