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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
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Mapping the 'Time Boundaries' of a City

Mapping the 'Time Boundaries' of a City | visual data | Scoop.it
An EU-funded project is building platforms to detect patterns in how people use urban spaces.


Maps don't typically convey time very well. They're static snapshots of a moment in history. A handful of animated maps that do a good job combining time and space using either transit data or geo-tagged social-media hits.

Now a new project, called Geographies of Time, is trying to do something similar with a more typical two-dimensional map. The effort is part of a broader EU-funded projects called UrbanSensing that's building platforms to detect patterns in how people use urban spaces.

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luiy's curator insight, November 28, 2013 6:21 AM

Giorgia Lupi, the Ph.D. researcher at Milan Politecnico behind the project, began with Milan. Using tens of thousands of geo-tagged tweets, she and colleagues divided the map of the city into a fine-grained grid. The tweets were then divided into eight three-hour time intervals (from midnight to 3 a.m., 3 a.m. to 6 a.m., etc.). And the boxes in the grid were digitally colored based on the time window when Twitter was locally most active.

nuria font-casaseca's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:21 AM

Les ciutats i els temps: com ens movem per la ciutat en funció de l'hora i el dia.

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Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized

Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized | visual data | Scoop.it
In this graphic by the Tree of Life web project and designer Leonard Eisenberg, we see all 3.5 billion years of life on earth evolving, not through limbs and timelines, but an elegant rainbow swirl. It’s as if our whole history is a colorful bunch of balloons, all tying back to bacteria.

As you look at the graphic, realize that time radiates outward and each kingdom’s appearance is also in chronological order from left to right. What you’ll discern then is a story of origins and mass extinctions, the way life almost bided its time through the Ice Age then hit the gas through the Cambrian Explosion. It was here when the protostomes (everything from trilobites to squids) simply went nuts, and the separation of plants vs. animals as we know them arose...

 

Visit the article to learn more about the graphic that visualizes the history of the world...

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A Perspective on Time | Visual.ly

A Perspective on Time | Visual.ly | visual data | Scoop.it

'Humans are good at a lot of things, but putting time in perspective is not one of them. It's not our fault - the span of time in human history, and even more so in natural history, are so vast compared to the span of our life and recent history that it's almost impossible to get a handle on it.'

View the information sources and data here.

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An Illustrated Visualization of What Can Happen in a Single Second

An Illustrated Visualization of What Can Happen in a Single Second | visual data | Scoop.it

We’ve previously explored time and the scale of the universe, but what about the scale of time? Do we fully understand the 2.5 billion seconds most of us will experience in an average lifetime?

That’s precisely what prolific science author and illustrator Steve Jenkins playfully probes in Just a Second, a lovely and refreshing book for kids, doubling as a curious and enjoyable trivia compendium for grown-ups, and a fine addition to the year’s best children’s books. From the 5,085-foot water journey of a whale’s song to the 50 beats of a hummingbird’s wings to the 300-foot plunge of a peregrine falcon, the charmingly illustrated pages weave a kind of alternative metric system for telling time through the surprising things that happen in a single second — a measure that, as Jenkins points out, is a human invention...

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