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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past

18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past | visual data | Scoop.it

In 1939, visitors stood in line for hours to see the Futurama exhibit at the New York World's Fair, a detailed model imagining 1960s America. Complete with half a million tiny buildings and a million handmade miniature trees, it also visualized a network of highways crossing the country. And while the interstate system probably would have been built without it, it's arguable that the visualization—sponsored by GM—helped the roads happen.

A new exhibit called the Future City, up now at London's Royal Institute of British Architects, looks at how drawings and models of futuristic cities can shape the cities that actually are built.

"Visualizations of future cities contribute to our collective imagination," says Nick Dunn from Lancaster University "They provide us with visionary projections of how we might live. Reexamining these from a historical perspective can give us new insights and greater understanding of the developments and patterns that shape the present, and in turn, their implications for our future."

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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | visual data | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...

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Bhopkins's curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:53 AM

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

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High-Resolution Maps of Science

High-Resolution Maps of Science | visual data | Scoop.it

'Maps of science derived from citation data visualize the relationships among scholarly publications or disciplines. They are valuable instruments for exploring the structure and evolution of scholarly activity. Much like early world charts, these maps of science provide an overall visual perspective of science as well as a reference system that stimulates further exploration. However, these maps are also significantly biased due to the nature of the citation data from which they are derived: existing citation databases overrepresent the natural sciences; substantial delays typical of journal publication yield insights in science past, not present; and connections between scientific disciplines are tracked in a manner that ignores informal cross-fertilization..'


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3-D Data Visualization: How State of the Art Technology Enhances Research

3-D Data Visualization: How State of the Art Technology Enhances Research | visual data | Scoop.it

For graduate student Deven Vignali, the three-dimensional data visualization center at Montana Tech has made his life easier.

He’s using the $60,000 state-of-the-art software and tracking system to conduct research for his master’s thesis, proving that passive seismic acquisition techniques can be used to monitor geo-thermal resources, as in hot springs.

It’s the fastest high-performance computing system within Montana academia, said Jeff Braun, head of the Tech computer engineering and software engineering departments.

The system has 10 teraflops of theoretical speed and 1.5 terabytes of memory. Translation: It is equal to between 200 to 400 times the memory of a typical home laptop computer.

That’s why, compared to a regular desktop, the 3-D center greatly reduces research time.

Additionally, Vignali has used only 5 percent of the program’s capabilities, so it has a lot more to offer...

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An Infographic About Infographics

An Infographic About Infographics | visual data | Scoop.it

A picture is worth a thousand words, and Californian digital marketing agency, Bixa Media, have illustrated (pun intended) by creating an infographic about the importance of… well, infographics.


Based on the company’s research and insights, they found that visual data is absorbed 60,000x faster than text and people will only read about 20% of the text on a page.

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Data Visualization: Communication & Creativity

Data Visualization: Communication & Creativity | visual data | Scoop.it

Visual communication skills are alien to some in the research industry, but they needn’t be. Data visualisation can become part of the research process through smart hiring, skills training and expert partnerships.


Data visualisation should not be regarded as an end in itself; the real point to data visualisation - the value that it brings to research buyers and suppliers - is as an aid to storytelling. It’s about seeing the patterns in the data that flush out a story and then help you to start telling that story. Only by doing that can you move data off the spreadsheet and out into the real world of consumer behaviour and preferences.

The best analogy and the one used frequently, is with journalism. It’s no surprise either that many great examples of data visualisation come from the publishing and media sectors. Journalists face the same challenge that we do of sifting large amounts of often conflicting data to arrive at a truth or an insight...

Lauren Moss's insight:

An interesting look at the current role of data visualization and data journalism in the advancement of research, communication, and brand development.

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Scott Turner's curator insight, January 9, 2013 8:31 AM

An interesting look at the current role of data visualization and data journalism in the advancement of research, communication, and brand development.

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6 Ways Data Journalism is Making Sense of the World

6 Ways Data Journalism is Making Sense of the World | visual data | Scoop.it

When I wrote that Radar was investigating data journalism and asked for your favorite examples of good work, we heard back from around the world.

I received emails from Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Canada and Italy that featured data visualization, explored the role of data in government accountability, and shared how open data can revolutionize environmental reporting...


It was instructive to learn more about the work of two large media organizations, the Los Angeles Times and Canada’s Global News, which have been building their capacity to practice data journalism. The other international perspectives in my inbox and tweet stream, however, were a reminder that big-city newsrooms that can afford teams of programmers and designers aren’t the only players here.acts of data journalism by small teams or individuals aren’t just plausible, they’re happening — from Italy to Brazil to Africa.


That doesn’t mean that the news application teams at NPR, The Guardian, ProPublica or the New York Times aren’t setting the pace for data journalism when it comes to cutting edge work — far from it — but the tools and techniques to make something worthwhile are being democratized.

That’s possible in no small part because of the trend toward open source tools and social coding I’m seeing online, from Open Street Map to more open elections...

Lauren Moss's insight:

An interesting overall look at the state of data journalism on varying scales, as explored through the examination of case studies, resources and applications.

Of particular interest is the role of open data in generating content, and how that may affect the future of data visualization.

Still, the numerous online links provided within the article offer a substantial number of references on a broad range of topics that pertain to data journalism and visualization.

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Lise Benkemoun's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:30 AM

en France aussi ça bouge ! 

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Big Data Right Now: 5 Open Source Technologies

Big Data Right Now: 5 Open Source Technologies | visual data | Scoop.it

Big Data is on every CIO’s mind this quarter, and for good reason. Companies will have spent $4.3 billion on Big Data technologies by the end of 2012.
But here’s where it gets interesting.

Those initial investments will in turn trigger a domino effect of upgrades and new initiatives that are valued at $34 billion for 2013- over a 5 year period, spend is estimated at $232 billion. What we’re seeing right now is only the tip of a gigantic iceberg.


Read the original article for a closer 'look at five new technologies that are shaking things up in Big Data- the newest class of tools that you can’t afford to overlook...'

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We Are Here Now / Spatial Information Design Lab / Columbia University

We Are Here Now / Spatial Information Design Lab / Columbia University | visual data | Scoop.it

Always checking your favorite sites for updates, or checking in with Facebook or Foursquare? You’re not alone and Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab can prove it. In addition to sharing your whereabouts, your geographic mark provides insight in examining the psycho-geography and economic terrain of the city.

For their social media study, the Lab used the Foursquare and Facebook Application Programming Interfaces (API’s) access location-based data to determine where social media users broadcast that they are “Here Now”, and have transformed that data into a graphic language that provides a sense of how the city is organized with regards to how people travel around the city, where there are employment and commercial centers, and seasonal preferences...

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The Narrative Eros of the Infographic

The Narrative Eros of the Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

In 1976, neuroscientist Douglas Nelson definitively described the cognitive potency of the image as the pictorial superiority effect. He and others have shown that our brains are essentially hard-wired for visuals—the very architecture of our visual cortex allows graphics a unique mainline into our consciousness. According to Allan Pavio’s somewhat controversial dual-coding theory, imagery stimulates both verbal and visual representations, whereas language is primarily processed through only the verbal channel. While there has been considerable pushback to Pavio’s theory since its introduction in the 1970s, numerous experiments have shown that imagery activates multiple, powerful neural pathways of memory recall...

It is no surprise, then, that our media are now saturated with such infographics, both on-and off-line, as a host of publications such as The New York Times, Good, The Guardian, Wired, Time, The Economist, The Believer, and The Wall Street Journal all regularly depend on data visualizations to provide their readers with that on-the-spot, quasi-highbrow sociological analysis. As one might expect, the output is decidedly mixed. Faced with a glut of mediocre charts and diagrams, there is now a backlash among designers and journalists against the overuse of meaningless infographics...

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Google Maps: Designing the Modern Atlas

Google Maps: Designing the Modern Atlas | visual data | Scoop.it
Since its launch in 2004, Google Maps has come a long way from its relatively simple beginnings as a simple pannable and zoomable road map of the United States and United Kingdom. Today we display business and transit networks, three dimensional cities, natural terrain, and much more. It is a map that serves pedestrians, motorists, tourists and locals alike. Soon it was not only used it as a "clean" map for wayfinding and browsing but also as a base for overlays, search results, directions, and personal customization—with sources from all over the web. In the same vein as Google's mission, we are organizing the world's information in a geographic context.

The work and evolution behind this ambitious undertaking is a combination of design vision, product strategy, engineering prowess, and ethnographic and usability research...

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Data Visualization (or why pretty pictures matter)

Data Visualization (or why pretty pictures matter) | visual data | Scoop.it

Numbers are useful if they communicate important ideas and actionable concepts. They are useless if they meaninglessly clutter the field of information.

As an analyst, it’s not enough to simply pull out of the data the 15 or 20 most important numbers that that will make a difference for our client, we also need to convey that information in a way that’s as easy to process as possible.The human brain instinctively sizes up the green part of a pie chart and sees it is bigger than the red part of the pie chart faster and on a deeper level than it processes that 45% is larger than 28%. It’s why we plot trend numbers on a line graph rather than a row. The use of colors and shapes reinforce the points being made by the numbers, and the methods used to show the data increase the ease of absorption among your viewers, and consequently its impact.

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Paper: Privacy-Preserving Visualization

Paper: Privacy-Preserving Visualization | visual data | Scoop.it

The point of visualization is usually to reveal as much of the structure of a dataset as possible. But what if the data is sensitive or proprietary, and the person doing the analysis is not supposed to be able to know everything about it? In a paper to be presented next week at InfoVis, my Ph.D. student Aritra Dasgupta and I describe the issues involved in privacy-preserving visualization, and propose a variation of parallel coordinates that controls the amount of information shown to the user.

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Microsoft's RoomAlive turns rooms into augmented interactive displays

Microsoft's RoomAlive turns rooms into augmented interactive displays | visual data | Scoop.it

Microsoft Research has combined projection mapping with motion sensors create RoomAlive, which turns enclosed spaces into immersive augmented experiences.

The "proof-of-concept prototype" for RoomAlive uses a series of projectors and depth cameras to overlay existing surfaces with images turns the entire room into a giant interactive screen...

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Science Reveals Artists Really Do Have Different Brains

Science Reveals Artists Really Do Have Different Brains | visual data | Scoop.it

We might now have neurological proof that artists actually are different creatures from everyone else on the planet. According to a study published in Neurolmage, researchers believe that artists have brains that are structurally different from non-artists.

The study, titled "Drawing On The Right Side Of The Brain: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis Of Observational Drawing," included 44 graduate and post-grad art students and non-art students who were asked to complete various drawing tasks. The completed tasks were measured and scored, and that data was compared to "regional grey and white matter volume in the cortical and subcortical structures" of the brain using a scanning method called voxel-based morphometry. An increase in grey matter density on the left anterior cerebellum and the right medial frontal gyrus were observed in relation to drawing skills.

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Body maps show where we feel emotion

Body maps show where we feel emotion | visual data | Scoop.it

Engineering and psychology researchers in Finland investigated where we feel and don't feel.The team showed the volunteers two blank silhouettes of person on a screen and then told the subjects to think about one of 14 emotions: love, disgust, anger, pride, etc. The volunteers then painted areas of the body that felt stimulated by that emotion. On the second silhouette, they painted areas of the body that get deactivated during that emotion.


More at the link.


Via Nicholas Goubert
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Martin Daumiller's curator insight, January 5, 2014 4:55 AM

full paper: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/12/26/1321664111.full.pdf+html

MyKLogica's curator insight, January 6, 2014 6:56 AM

Interesante cómo las emociones se reflejan en nuestro cuerpo

jewell Moss's curator insight, March 2, 2014 1:35 PM

Which emotion are you?

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To Go from Big Data to Big Insight, Start with a Visual

To Go from Big Data to Big Insight, Start with a Visual | visual data | Scoop.it

Although data visualization has produced some of the most captivating artistic displays in recent memory, some of which have found their way into exhibits at the New York Museum of Modern Art and countless art installations around the world, business leaders are asking: is data visualization actionable?


Advanced digital R&D teams are figuring out how we can draw actionable insights from big data by documenting every tweet, retweet, and click from Twitter and Facebook that points to New York Times content, and then combining that with the browsing logs of what those users do when they land at the Times.

Asking important questions is essential to moving forward effectively with big data. Without visualization, we are much less efficient in getting to the questions whose answers teach us something. That's why visualizing data must be one of the most important tools for data scientists.

More at the link...

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How Big Data Can Boost Weather Forecasting

How Big Data Can Boost Weather Forecasting | visual data | Scoop.it

Increasing evidence of climate change worldwide is prompting governments and scientists to take action to protect people and property from its effects. But, to take effective action, they need to know understand a lot more about the weather–everything from what’s going to happen tomorrow to what’s coming next year.


IBM scientists are taking the lead in bringing the most sophisticated data analytics to bear on weather forecasting. They established at test bed in the New York City area, where they set up a three-dimensional grid of thousands of blocks. That makes it possible to run calculations that produce very precise weather forecasts for a particular locale. Using this capability, the team predicted with remarkable accuracy the snowfall totals in New York City during the snow storm that blanked the northeastern United States in February–and also to predict accurately when the snowfall would start and stop.

The Research team is putting their algorithms to work on behalf of cities around the world. For instance, Rio de Janeiro has recurring flooding and landslide problems in many hilly neighborhoods, so the researchers used data to create a mathematical model of how storms are likely to unfold in Rio. With it, they can predict up to 40 hours ahead of time how much rain will fall in a particular location—with 90% accuracy.

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100 Diagrams That Changed the World

100 Diagrams That Changed the World | visual data | Scoop.it

A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web.


Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even decorate abstract concepts like consciousness and love.

100 Diagrams That Changed the World by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinational, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines.

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Patrizia Bertini's curator insight, December 30, 2012 5:59 AM

I see! - goes together with embodied cognition? It seems so... Infographics as a key?

bancoideas's curator insight, December 30, 2012 9:28 AM

Ideas acerca de las ideas que tenemos sobte nosotros/as mismos/as y el mundo que co-construimos

Denise Eler's curator insight, June 30, 2015 7:26 PM

Quando um gestor pede que uma apresentação de 80 slides seja condensada em 3 slides, ou uma página A3, não tenha dúvida: isto vai exigir de você mais que capacidade de síntese textual. Pensar visualmente, especialmente, criando diagramas é uma competência valiosa. Vejo isso durante meus cursos e vivência com profissionais das mais variadas indústrias. A boa notícia é que dá para aprender ;)

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INFOGRAPHICS: 10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW | Visual.ly

INFOGRAPHICS: 10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW | Visual.ly | visual data | Scoop.it
Kevin Akers design + imagery has just designed an infographic about infographics.
The list of top ten things everyone should know about the new marketing phenomenon clarifies how to create interesting,noteworthy infographics...
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Open Data Emerges as a Global Movement

Open Data Emerges as a Global Movement | visual data | Scoop.it

“Open data” — the philosophy and practice of making the data collected by government agencies freely available to the public — is critical to increasing citizens’ engagement with their governments. Since 2010, hundreds of nations, regions, and cities across the world have launched their own open data initiatives.

For example, datacatalogs.org maintains centralized lists of local, regional, and national data catalogs. Europe is heavily represented: nearly every country publishes open data, geospatial files and maps and statistics. Within each nation, local councils, regional governments, and autonomous regions are publishing their own locally-relevant open data. Spain, Italy, and France each boast over a dozen internal data catalogs created by local agencies...

Whether or not open data portals eventually lead to open, transparent, and accountable democratic governments is still up for debate, but they remain indispensable to the citizens, researchers, and journalists using data from these sites.


Read the complete post for a better understanding of open data in a concise, yet informative article with numerous links and specific initiatives referenced for further research...

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Johnson Watts's comment, October 2, 2012 1:35 PM
It's not the size of government that counts. It's the transparency, agility, and democracy of goverment that matters.
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DensityDesign | Research

DensityDesign | Research | visual data | Scoop.it

DensityDesign is a Research Lab in the design department of the Politecnico di Milano. It focuses on the visual representation of complex social, organizational and urban phenomena. Although producing, collecting, and sharing information has become much easier, robust methods and effective visual tools are still needed to observe and explore the nature of complex issues. Our research aim is to exploit the potential of information visualization and information design and provide innovative and engaging visual artifacts to enable researchers and scholars to build solid arguments. By rearranging numeric data, reinterpreting qualitative information, locating information geographically, and building visual taxonomies, we can develop a diagrammatic visualization—a sort of graphic shortcut—to describe and unveil the hidden connections of complex systems. Our visualizations are open, inclusive, and preserve multiple interpretations of complex phenomena. DensityDesign is committed to collaborating with other researchers and organizations devoted to academic independence and rigor, open enquiry, and risk taking to enhance our understanding of the world.

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What Makes a Good Infographic?

What Makes a Good Infographic? | visual data | Scoop.it

Not even the experts agree. Despite sharing a common goal – to create solutions that meet their respective communication objectives – designers fight over the most basic notion in information design: what does and what doesn’t constitute an infographic?

Among the different approaches to visualization, one design element stands out in dividing the schools of thought: decoration.

Business intelligence expert Stephen Few sums up his disdain for the ornamentation of infographics: “When visualizations are used primarily for artistic purposes, they are not what we call data visualizations or infographics, which are terms that have been in use for a long time with particular meanings.”

Another highly visible figure, David McCandless, has popularized artistic visualizations and introduced data as a storytelling category to a wider audience. He describes his work:

“I love taking all kinds of information – data, numbers, ideas, knowledge – and making them into images. When you visualize information in this way, you can start to see the patterns and connections that matter.”

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The Debate: Have Infographics Jumped The Shark?

The Debate: Have Infographics Jumped The Shark? | visual data | Scoop.it
Megan McArdle at the Atlantic piles on the Infographic debate, " issuing a plea to bloggers to help stop this plague in its track."...

 

A while back I asked 'Have infographics jumped the shark?'.

At the time I was complaining primarily about how well they convey information and how easy they are to check since they lack hyperlinks. I alluded to some pretty strange linkbait. Then we, like a lot of other sites, got caught in the pure linkbait play Bikes Will Save You and the Planet (Infographic) which is still up for some reason. Chris responded to this with his post On Bike Infographics & Link Marketing, where he noted that even a good infographic can make us feel "icky" if they are linkbait.

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The world of Wikipedia's languages mapped

The world of Wikipedia's languages mapped | visual data | Scoop.it
What happens if you map every geotagged Wikipedia article - and then analyse it for language use?

Mark Graham and the team at the Oxford Internet Institute (who've mapped zombies and every geotagged picture on Flickr) decided to find out as part of their research into the state of the internet - and then break it down by different languages.

Graham, who also runs the blogs floatingsheep.org and zerogeography.net looked at Wikipedia in the Middle East, North Africa, and East Africa in the November 2011 versions of the Arabic, Egyptian Arabic, English, French.

Each one of the yellow dots represents the "human effort that has gone into describing some aspect of a place".

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