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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Michael Pecirno's Minimalist Maps Reveal the Hidden Landscapes of America

Michael Pecirno's Minimalist Maps Reveal the Hidden Landscapes of America | visual data | Scoop.it

London-based designer Michael Pecirno creates minimalist maps in an ongoing project to understand the landscape of the world. His work is exploratory, using a decidedly narrow set of data to see the unique patterns it creates across the land. In each case, the map is drawn with data points, leaving traditional physical and political borders to our imagination.

Each map visualizes the lower 48 states of the US, using a wealth of information from the USDA to detail specific features like urbanization, fields planted with corn, the spread of grasslands, or bodies of water. The map reveals a new and insightful view of America’s composition.

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It's Never Been This Easy to Find a Great Topographical Map

It's Never Been This Easy to Find a Great Topographical Map | visual data | Scoop.it
The USGS is on a open-access roll with topoView, an advanced new map-finding tool.

The cartography arm of the U.S. Geological Survey has been on an open-access roll. First they send their constantly updating stream of satellite imagery to what's basically a public dropbox, so that anyone can use Landsat-8 photographs for free. And now they're introducing topoView, an online archival tool that makes truly accessible the agency's 178,000 topographical maps, dating from 1880 (shortly after the USGS started mapping the country) to 2010.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, May 8, 2015 6:34 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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12 Stylized Maps That Express The Evolving Nature of the Urban Landscape

12 Stylized Maps That Express The Evolving Nature of the Urban Landscape | visual data | Scoop.it
Viewed together, these colorful and impressionistic maps depict the organic, evolving nature of the urban landscape.

Charles Labanowski creates hundreds of stylized city maps, and the 483 maps he's put together so far are both an accurate reflection of the actual topography of places and impressionistic in what they depict.

Maps are at the intersection of so many interesting things," he says. "For one, they are a beautiful combination of organic and unplanned, and inorganic and planned growth—sort of a constantly evolving, living history. They can also be emotionally evocative—whether it’s reminding you of some past experience or inspiring a desire to travel and explore a new place."

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19 Maps That Reorganize the Way We See the World

19 Maps That Reorganize the Way We See the World | visual data | Scoop.it

Most maps focus on demographics, geological makeup, and natural phenomena such as temperature and wind. No one focuses on other matters though, such as the alphabetic makeup of states when you sort their names in various ways. Break the names apart and put them back together. Examine the parts to gain a vision of the whole.

Find more maps, information and takeaways at the article.

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, August 14, 2014 10:31 AM

De curieuses cartes !!

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40 Maps That Explain The Internet

40 Maps That Explain The Internet | visual data | Scoop.it

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world.

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Well Connected Mom's curator insight, August 22, 2014 8:04 PM

Curious how the Internet started?  These maps of servers show the progression.

Coolwired's curator insight, August 31, 2014 10:04 AM

This informative site sheds light on the pervasive workings of the Internet.

Mel Leggatt's curator insight, November 20, 2014 11:36 AM

A really excellent visual resource for understanding how the Internet has and continues to evolve.

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This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It

This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It | visual data | Scoop.it
An experiment from Nairobi with implications for the urbanizing world.

As transit systems go, the "matatus" in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded.

Not surprisingly, many passengers on board know little about them, either. Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it...

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Favorite Digital Maps of 2013

Favorite Digital Maps of 2013 | visual data | Scoop.it

'The digital maps we loved in 2013 didn't simply illustrate novel or useful information. They did it in ways we'd never seen before, manipulating time, dimensions, perspective, even the atmosphere. These maps weren't just interesting in content; they were innovative in design. That's our new bar for 2014.

So this December, instead of sharing our top 10 maps of the year, we're looking at 10 ways we've learned to think about maps in entirely new ways. This may well have been the year when maps ceased to impress us for what they convey and began to stun us instead for how they did it.'

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A Treasure Trove Of Historical New York City Subway Maps

A Treasure Trove Of Historical New York City Subway Maps | visual data | Scoop.it

NYCSubway.org is an impressive resource for information about the New York City subway system. 
The website has an entire page dedicated to the archiving of historical NYC subway maps that date from 1880 to the present day—the page also features a smaller selection of bus maps. 

The designs of the older subway maps are distinctly different from what commuters are used to today, and reflect the changing graphic design styles used over the years.


If you are a lover of transit maps, this page will keep you happily engrossed—view more vintage maps of the NYC subway over here... 

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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | visual data | Scoop.it

If you’re a visual learner, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that.

A few of these maps are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head.

If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit. You should also check outChartsBin.com. There were also fantastic posts on Business Insider and Bored Panda earlier this year that are worth checking out. Enjoy!

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Maps of unrealized city plans reveal what might have been

Maps of unrealized city plans reveal what might have been | visual data | Scoop.it

Maps can direct us from here to there, show where one thing is in relation to another, or add layers information to our surroundings. Whatever its form, a map’s main purpose is to make the complex world we live in more comprehensible.

But there are also maps that describe the world as it never came to be.

Those are the maps that interest Andrew Lynch, who runs a Tumblr called Hyperreal Cartography & The Unrealized City that's full of city maps collected from libraries, municipal archives, and dark corners of the internet.

Lynch recently shared a few of his favorite “dream cities” with WIRED’s MapLab...


Via Luca Baptista
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Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place

Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place | visual data | Scoop.it

Take a look at a set of maps that tell encoded stories of politics, natural disasters and social movements.


There are many nice Flickr visualizations of global cities but never anything quite this comprehensive across space and time: Meet Luminous Cities, a creation of the London-based mapping and digital arts firm TraceMedia, built with support from the Centre for Spatial Analysis & Policy at the University of Leeds and the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

The project is trying to "uncover the archeology of data traces left by social media" in cities across the globe...

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Infographic: The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name In The U.S.

Infographic: The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name In The U.S. | visual data | Scoop.it

The New Navel of the Moon. It’s so poetic, isn’t it? (And sure, maybe a bit anatomically confusing.) That’s the real meaning behind the state name New Mexico, and it’s one of many etymological gems uncovered by cartographers Stephan Hormes and Silke Peust while they were creating this U.S. map depicting the original, literal meanings behind the states and cities we know today.


“The inspiration was my interest in etymology and my profession as a cartographer," Hormes tells Co.Design. "I started to exchange real names for rue names and the world became a strange romantic continent. It’s obvious to me that after five years of changing names on maps, I must do it. No map is safe.”

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See A Beautiful, Data-Enriched Map of New York City

See A Beautiful, Data-Enriched Map of New York City | visual data | Scoop.it

Londoner Marcus Kirby was bored with traditional maps and pastel-colored countries, so he started a company to revive the age-old business of cartography. 

The Future Mapping Company uses traditional map-making techniques (lithographic instead of digital) to create colorful, intricate city representations. Most recently, the company has created a map of New York City, to be released later this month.

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City Layouts Created with OpenStreetMap Data

City Layouts Created with OpenStreetMap Data | visual data | Scoop.it

Topography, architecture and traffic routes give every city a unique structure.
'These conditions create the typical and individual inner structure of a city. I didn’t only want to show these structures in the conventional way from above, but also including the exact three-dimensionality of topography and buildings – a real world visualisation.
The OpenStreetMap data enabled me to visualize the satellite-based information using DEM Earth in Cinema 4D. The results are some extraordinary views of large capitals and small towns.'

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A Beautiful Blueprint-Style Map of the World

A Beautiful Blueprint-Style Map of the World | visual data | Scoop.it
It's the work of a Philadelphia-based data scientist who, a year ago, had never made a map.

At this time last year, Lauren Ancona had never made a map. But halfway into 2014, with help from from the free and open source mapping community and Code for America, she successfully created her first map of Philadelphia parking districts.

The parking map got a lot of attention and landed Ancona a job with the city's Office of Innovation and Technology as a data scientist. Now she's back with a beautiful blueprint-style world map made using Mapbox Studio.

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How Fractals Bring Imaginary Cities to Life

How Fractals Bring Imaginary Cities to Life | visual data | Scoop.it
Artist Emily Garfield maps places that don't exist. "I think that's related to the way cities grow in real life."

Emily Garfield like to say that she grows cities. With pen, ink, and watercolor, the Boston-based artist creates maps of imaginary places that tap into the essence of urban form.

Garfield has long been interested by the presentation of architecture in visual art. The inviting, surrealist arcades and sidewalks of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico inspired Garfield to begin producing her own street-level dreamscapes as an art student at Brown University.

But it was when she created her first aerial view of a fantasy city—an abstract web of streets, bridges, and blocks—that she got a particularly positive response from other people. Even without any text, Garfield's drawings were strongly recognizable as maps...

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Before and After: Mapping LA 100 Years Ago and Today

Before and After: Mapping LA 100 Years Ago and Today | visual data | Scoop.it

'Any map-lovers looking to lose track of time for a few hours should say hello to the newly-arrived USGS Historical Topographic Map Explorer, which allows users access to a treasure trove of maps of cities across the nation and lets users load multiple maps and toggle the transparency of each, so you can see the old map overlaid on the map of today. Go back to the turn-of-the-century maps of Los Angeles to find the old ranchos, or to the '40s and '50s to see old Pacific Electric lines. Compare pre- and post-Dodger Stadium maps of Elysian Park; see cartographic evidence of the lake at Westlake Park before it was split in half by Wilshire Boulevard, or of Los Feliz spelled Los Felis. It's all here, for the casual, time-sucking perusal of the public. We've collected a few of our favorite greater Los Angeles details into a handful of colorful before-and-afters below. We'll look closer at specific neighborhoods in the coming days...'

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Stunning Maps of World Topography

Stunning Maps of World Topography | visual data | Scoop.it

Robin Edwards, a researcher at UCL CASA, has created these stunning topographic maps using the high resolution elevation data provided by the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The transitions from black (high areas) to blue (low areas) give the maps a slightly ethereal appearance to dramatic effect.

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50 Maps Showing Where and What Happens in Cities Across the Globe

50 Maps Showing Where and What Happens in Cities Across the Globe | visual data | Scoop.it

“Where people post geotagged photos to Flickr from and geotagged tweets to Twitter from.” via Eric Fischer

Red dots are locations of Flickr pictures. Blue dots are locations of Twitter tweets. White dots are locations that have been posted to both. 

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Patrice Mitrano's curator insight, February 4, 2014 8:51 AM

voir aussi la page Flickr d'Eric Fischer, l'auteur de ces images spectaculaires : http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/

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20 Informative and Useful Infographic Maps

20 Informative and Useful Infographic Maps | visual data | Scoop.it

'We've gathered 20 Informative and Useful Infographic Maps with some unique subjects. They are well designed and contain some very helpful information.'

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | visual data | Scoop.it

The Smithsonian magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating.

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Gordon Shupe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:24 AM

I love interactive maps, and history is fascinating... let's take a look!

Sue Bedard's curator insight, September 5, 2013 8:09 AM

Great for comparrison and reasoning

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The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED

The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED | visual data | Scoop.it
This giant installation and a website you can play with at home lets you compare the worlds urban centers side by side.

We live in a world of easily accessible maps; however, our map knowledge is limited by the fact that no two cities collect data the same way. Maps often aren’t drawn to the same scale, and until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare data on things like income, cost of living, water distribution, and power grids.

It’s a problem that has bugged Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference (as well as an architect and graphic designer), for decades.

Wurman recently teamed up with Jon Kamen of Radical Media and Esri president Jack Dangermond to create an ambitious solution: the Urban Observatory, an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on.


Find more details and information at the article link...

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Subway Maps Of Cities Around The World Redesigned In A Circular Format

Subway Maps Of Cities Around The World Redesigned In A Circular Format | visual data | Scoop.it

Mapmaker Max Roberts has created a new way to map out subway lines.  Conventional maps usually emphasize “straight lines, clean angles and geographical accuracy”. Unlike those maps, Roberts’ circular design is a blend of “aesthetics and usability”. 

Roberts discovered this “completely new way of designing maps” when he was designing a map for the London Underground that took into account the circular nature of the Orbital rail link. He realized the potential of the new design in forcing “cities into an unprecedented level of organization” and the coherence achieved. Sacrificing geographical accuracy, his schematic design shows how elements in the map relate to each other logically, while taming the web of criss-crossed lines usually found in subway maps.

View maps of the New York City Subway, the London Underground and the Paris Metro at the article link, or head over to hiswebsite to see more circular maps of other cities. 

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Niki Brown Beck's curator insight, December 5, 2014 9:44 PM

New perspective (transportation)

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NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | visual data | Scoop.it

Even for the most direction-savvy New Yorker, emerging from the dark pit of the subway can be a disorienting experience. New York City streets are bright, they’re loud, oftentimes they’re smelly, and worst of all, maps are virtually non-existent. Or at least that used to be the case.


Just this week, the Department of Transportation unveiled its WalkNYC initiative, a program that will bring comprehensive pedestrian maps to all five boroughs. In a city where an estimated 30 percent of all trips are made by foot and one out of every three locals can’t tell north from south, they’re probably going to come in handy.


Though NYC’s public transportation is top-notch and we are technically on a grid, it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed when traveling by foot. That’s why the DOT enlisted the help of PentaCityGroup, a consortium of urban planners, engineers, designers, cartographers and geographical information specialists, to solve the problem.

Their goal? To create an information-packed map that would orient pedestrians and help them find the gems each NYC neighborhood has to offer. The first of these new information kiosks was installed earlier this week in Chinatown (they’re already located at every Citi Bike station), and it’s expected that others will be popping up in midtown Manhattan, Long Island City in Queens and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn this summer

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luiy's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:49 AM

If the style of these maps looks familiar, that’s because it is. The design team wanted to marry the current design to the graphic language that was was established for the subway system in the late 1960s. The typeface is still Helvetica (albeit with a slight twist–the type’s square dots are now round) and it uses the same organizational conventions (white type on a dark background). “All of this was deliberately echoing the way the subways look,” Bierut explains. “We wanted people to be able to ride the subway, come out and orient themselves.” Bierut says the design of the maps is meant to be accurate, trustworthy and friendly. But not too friendly—this is New York City, after all. “We wanted these things to be beautiful in a way, but also characteristic of the best of New York.”

ParadigmGallery's comment, July 8, 2013 4:02 PM
great...can't wait to try these...
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Exquisite Paper Sculptures Map Historic Events

Exquisite Paper Sculptures Map Historic Events | visual data | Scoop.it

It’s easy to admire Matthew Picton’s paper sculpted maps simply for their fine craftsmanship and close resemblance to the famous cities they represent – but you’d be missing so much hidden in the details. 


Beyond the exquisitely folded ribbons of paper forming the delicate maps are tales from each city’s storied past: floods, fires, wars. Each element has been carefully researched and woven into the final sculpture, from the paper used to create it, to the destruction Picton often revisits on the cities.

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