visual data
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visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Solarium: Enter the Sun in New NASA Video Installation

Inside the Solarium, a video installation by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), you can enter the belly of the sun without worrying about frying to a crisp. In fact, the dynamic visuals of the giant star’s turbulent gas atmosphere exploding and erupting on the walls of the Goddard Space Flight Center's Visitor Center are surprisingly serene.

Since Feb 11, 2010, SDO has been watching the sun, taking one picture a second, and collecting data to trace how materials enter into the layers of the corona, the massive aura that surrounds the sun. Paired with audio crafted from 40 days of data from the now-defunct Michelson Doppler Imager, the creators adjusted SDO’s vast collection of solar images to “elicit a calming, soothing and mesmerizing experience,” with each minute of footage taking around 10 hours to complete. 

From records of images as binary code, through computer translations of the data into black-and-white pictures, a coloring process that highlights different wavelengths of ultraviolet light, and finally motion graphics and video softwares, bringing the Sun to the Earth was no easy feat—but Solarium was well the effort.

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A Weathervane Wall Turns Wind Patterns Into Data Art

A Weathervane Wall Turns Wind Patterns Into Data Art | visual data | Scoop.it

We can generally tell if the wind is blowing north, south, east or west, but on a smaller scale, currents are a lot more complicated. And that’s something I didn’t really appreciate before Windswept.
Windswept is an art installation at San Francisco’s Randall Museum that celebrates the intricacies of wind interacting with architecture. To create the effect, designer Charles Sowers deployed 612 freely-rotating anodized aluminum arrows on a 20'x35' grid, each serving as a “discrete data point” of extremely local airflow to form “a kind of large sensor array.”

With all of these data points firing at once, the result is fascinating and a touch hypnotic. Whereas I’d expect the entire wall of arrows to point the same way, they never do. Instead, it’s more like watching the Plinko of air currents, with every peg offering a largely unpredictable--but in retrospect inevitable--possibility...

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