visual data
Follow
Find tag "geography"
43.4K views | +9 today
visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How the U.S. Maps the World's Most Disputed Territories

How the U.S. Maps the World's Most Disputed Territories | visual data | Scoop.it

When the United States decides to recognize a new government, or an existing country changes its name, Leo Dillon and his team at the State Department spring into action.

Dillon heads the Geographical Information Unit, which is responsible for ensuring the boundaries and names on government maps reflect U.S. policy. The team also keeps an eye on border skirmishes and territorial disputes throughout the world and makes maps that are used in negotiating treaties and truces. 

Dillon’s been at the State Department since 1986, and he says his job remains as fun as ever. “The landscape of political geography is constantly changing,” he said. “Every day I come in here and there’s something new.” We spoke with Dillon to learn more about it...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How a Map Is Like an Op-Ed: Geography as a Storytelling Tool

How a Map Is Like an Op-Ed: Geography as a Storytelling Tool | visual data | Scoop.it

Thanks to the open data movement and Google Map Maker, anyone with a computer can create a map. These maps tell a story, but it's a subjective one. And while that can be a powerful tool, it can also skew perspectives and cloud a debate.

"We should really teach people to read maps in that way," says Laura Kurgan, an associate professor of architecture at Columbia University. "Maps are arguments, just like a piece of written journalism is an argument."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Visualization deconstructed: Why animated geospatial data works

Visualization deconstructed: Why animated geospatial data works | visual data | Scoop.it
When you plot geographic data onto the scenery of a map and then create a shifting window into that scene through the sequence of time, you create a deep, data-driven story.

One of the most powerful examples of interactive visualization is the animation of geospatial data. In its simplest state, this is geographical data with a timestamp, but when you plot this data onto the scenery of a map and then create a shifting window and a data-driven story.

So what are the design elements and characteristics that make these visualizations so powerful?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Mapping the 'Time Boundaries' of a City

Mapping the 'Time Boundaries' of a City | visual data | Scoop.it
An EU-funded project is building platforms to detect patterns in how people use urban spaces.


Maps don't typically convey time very well. They're static snapshots of a moment in history. A handful of animated maps that do a good job combining time and space using either transit data or geo-tagged social-media hits.

Now a new project, called Geographies of Time, is trying to do something similar with a more typical two-dimensional map. The effort is part of a broader EU-funded projects called UrbanSensing that's building platforms to detect patterns in how people use urban spaces.

more...
luiy's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:21 AM

Giorgia Lupi, the Ph.D. researcher at Milan Politecnico behind the project, began with Milan. Using tens of thousands of geo-tagged tweets, she and colleagues divided the map of the city into a fine-grained grid. The tweets were then divided into eight three-hour time intervals (from midnight to 3 a.m., 3 a.m. to 6 a.m., etc.). And the boxes in the grid were digitally colored based on the time window when Twitter was locally most active.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Intersection of Geography & Data: 2012's Best Maps

The Intersection of Geography & Data: 2012's Best Maps | visual data | Scoop.it

It's been an eventful year for cartography.


Development and disaster continue to mold the physical world, but for mapmakers, keeping up with geographic changes is busy work -- a tweaked direction here, a freeway exit there. It's very important busy work, as we learned this September when Apple reminded us not to take a good map for granted.


The intersection of geography and data, though, is just beginning to fill out. Together with interactive functions like sliders, timelines, and embedded information, the best new maps resemble Rand McNally's about as much as movies look like photographs. Creating an accurate representation of geography and infrastructure is only the tip of the iceberg.

What happens when you integrate statistics about rising seas, gang affiliations, metaphors and beer?


A whole new understanding of the way the world works. And some pretty sweet maps. Without further ado, the top favorite maps of the year...


(visit the article link for the maps and associated links)

Lauren Moss's insight:

A gallery of different approaches to visualizing topics covering a broad range of data through cartography and mapping...

Examples are supplemented with a summary of the intent, process + graphics of each map, noting the elements that make for successful representations of specific concepts, ideas + data.

From urban issues to voting trends to navigation apps and software, maps are tools that can be highly effective in data visualization, as evidenced in this cartographic collection curated by the Atlantic Cities.

more...
No comment yet.