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visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
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Functional Art: Infographics as moral acts

Functional Art: Infographics as moral acts | visual data | Scoop.it
Edward Tufte is —among many other good things— the Oscar Wilde of information graphics and visualization: He tends to write in aphorisms and epigrams, so he is a very quotable essayist. Here's a paragraph of his that I hold dear:

"Making an evidence presentation is a moral act as well as an intellectual activity. To maintain standards of quality, relevance, and integrity for evidence, consumers of presentations should insist that presenters be held intellectually and ethically responsible for what they show and tell. Thus consuming a presentation is also an intellectual and moral activity."

 

That paragraph speaks to the three persons that coexist in me: The journalist, the educator, and the information designer. Its main theme is central in The Functional Art: Correctly presenting data and phenomena in a graphic is not just a professional endeavor; it is also —above all— an ethical mandate. So is openly and candidly discuss mistakes, yours and others'. In infographics and visualization, the decisions we make on how to encode information, how to organize it, and how to present it, should be guided by a simple principle: Whatever improves citizens' interest in a relevant topic and their understanding of it is morally and ethically* good; whatever obscures the subject, trivializes it, or misleads audiences is bad...

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A Code of Ethics for Data Visualization Professionals

A Code of Ethics for Data Visualization Professionals | visual data | Scoop.it
Data Visualization is a relatively new field and as such, it has a lot of maturing to do. And part of that process is determining what is acceptable practice.

It is important to have a visible code of ethics because it establishes a standard of quality, helps us garner trust from clients, users and viewers, and gives our team a sense of confidence and pride in their work.

But how do you develop a visualization-specific code of ethics? In many ways, visualization is similar to journalism. In fact, many – if not most – large newspapers have created dedicated visualization departments, which produce some of the highest-quality data visualizations we see today. That’s hardly coincidental. Much like journalists, data visualization professionals have to collect data and information and then represent it to the public in the most truthful way possible...

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