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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Infographic: 4,000 Years Of Human History Captured In One Retro Chart

Infographic: 4,000 Years Of Human History Captured In One Retro Chart | visual data | Scoop.it

If time is a river, the Histomap, first published by Rand McNally back in 1931, is a raging Mississippi. In that massive river of time, each of humanity’s great civilizations becomes a confluence that ebbs, wanes, and sometimes ebbs again, each a separate current in a river that inexorably rages down to the mouth of the present day.

Although certainly not modern, the Histomap is still a breathtaking example of good infographic design: A five-foot, roll-up chart that can fit an overview of human history on any wall. Starting in 2000 B.C. with seven different civilizations--the Aegeans, the Egyptians, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Iranians, the Indians, the Huns, and the Chinese--you travel forward or backward in time as your eyes move up or down 0.75 inches. Some civilizations bleed together, others are swallowed up; some surge, others crash...

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Franc Viktor Nekrep's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:31 AM

add your insight...

 
Sieg Holle's curator insight, August 30, 2013 9:56 AM

We can learn from history 

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An infographic timeline of timelines and infographics | Visual.ly

An infographic timeline of timelines and infographics | Visual.ly | visual data | Scoop.it

An infographic timeline of timelines and infographics, featuring the Isotype of Gerd Arntz and the official typeface of the Vienna Method, Futura...

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | visual data | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Infographic: The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name In The U.S.

Infographic: The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name In The U.S. | visual data | Scoop.it

The New Navel of the Moon. It’s so poetic, isn’t it? (And sure, maybe a bit anatomically confusing.) That’s the real meaning behind the state name New Mexico, and it’s one of many etymological gems uncovered by cartographers Stephan Hormes and Silke Peust while they were creating this U.S. map depicting the original, literal meanings behind the states and cities we know today.


“The inspiration was my interest in etymology and my profession as a cartographer," Hormes tells Co.Design. "I started to exchange real names for rue names and the world became a strange romantic continent. It’s obvious to me that after five years of changing names on maps, I must do it. No map is safe.”

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Big Data Techniques for Analyzing Large Data Sets – Infographic

Big Data Techniques for Analyzing Large Data Sets – Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

Until the emergence of “Big Data”, data were mainly treated locally in warehouses of several structured databases. Gradually, these data sources became diversified.


Analysts are projecting the future of customer data. Several points of attention are highlighted. While most companies collect, store and analyze data, majority of them are struggling with their big project data and are struggling to meet IT challenges associated with the use of this framework.


Newscientis, with Microsoft, released an infographic on how big data techniques seek to gain insight by analyzing large data sets. The proliferation of sources associated with 3V (volume, variety, velocity) have contributed to big data’s recent growth. Data is coming in a growing variety of new and often unstructured forms such as text, video and sensor reading.

By 2020, all the digital data created, replicated and consumed per year will reach 40,000 Exabytes. The connected devices including pocket calculators, personnel computer, mobile phones, servers and mainframes and videogame consoles have contributed more than 10 million instructions per second.

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Dazzling Infographics Design Elements: Vector Resources

Dazzling Infographics Design Elements: Vector Resources | visual data | Scoop.it

Information graphics or infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

The process of creating infographics can be referred to as data visualization, information design, or information architecture. In newspapers, infographics are commonly used to show the weather, maps, site plans, charts and graphs for statistical data.


These infographic element kits are all editable vector shapes in organized file formats, for use in presentation, print files or web site graphics.

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Arabian Gazette's curator insight, May 19, 2013 4:52 AM

May your next Infographic be done in a breeze!

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A Guide to Infographic Elements

A Guide to Infographic Elements | visual data | Scoop.it

When it comes to visualizing data, it’s important to pick the right graph and the right kind of data range. Make it too detailed, and information gets lost and the reader leaves confused. Too simplified, and your data’s integrity is weakened.


Choosing the right infographic element shouldn’t be an art but common sense. After all, it’s an infographic – readers should get the gist of things at first glance and not have to get crossed-eyed in making sense of things...

Lauren Moss's insight:

General reference for basic visualization design elements, applications, and best practices...

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How to Make the Most of Big Data [Infographic]

How to Make the Most of Big Data [Infographic] | visual data | Scoop.it

Big Data has become an essential part of the world of business, providing billions of data points from targeted audiences globally.

Data points are comprised of the market intelligence that have been gathered into consumer behavior, purchasing patterns and brand affinity across numerous verticals from auto, tech, gaming, health and beauty, entertainment, and travel, among others.

The customer intelligence derived from actionable data helps identify markets and customers, measure brand loyalty and pinpoint new trends; ultimately, helping companies understand what people think.


Big data doesn’t come from one source, but from a multitude of sources – surveys, focus groups, mobile feedback, purchase history and customer service to name a few...


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Snail Mail vs Email [infographic]: old school direct lives on...

Snail Mail vs Email [infographic]: old school direct lives on... | visual data | Scoop.it

Snail mail – the original form of direct marketing – lives, according to a recent consumer survey, showing that the average Australian receives around seven letters per week, with government departments the most prolific users of the medium for communication purposes.


Read rates were high for most sender categories, much higher than standard email open rates, with special interest clubs and government leading the pack with open rates of 79% and 78% respectively. Read rates were less favourable for correspondence from real estate agents and local restaurants, while supermarket communication proved more likely to be read than department store mail.

For all categories respondents of the nationally representative survey preferred to receive correspondence via snail mail than email, although there were high numbers of people with no preference either way. Snail mail is preferred for lengthier or important information while email is preferred for brief information. As could be expected, older generations are more likely to be receptive to mail than email...

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10 Infographics About Typography

10 Infographics About Typography | visual data | Scoop.it

Typography is a crucial component of great designs involving text, so knowing as much as you can about it is an important step to becoming a great designer. This roundup of infographics will help you discover new and interesting things (as well as reinforce and reiterate stuff you already know) about typography.


Click the Go to Source link under each infographic to navigate to the source of the infographic and to see the larger version provided by the creator of the infographic...

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The Big Data Explosion [infographic]

The Big Data Explosion [infographic] | visual data | Scoop.it

Data is everywhere!

Take a look at the data that is being produced throughout the world every day and the sources of the explosion of big data...

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Andres Zurita's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:27 AM

amazing flow of info...

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Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design

Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design | visual data | Scoop.it

My classmates and I are in the Design for Social Innovation program because we identified problems in our communities, companies, or cultures and are keen to figure them out. But before talking about any solution or outcome, one must first frame the problem—by thoughtfully examining the system it’s part of to understand where and how to get involved.

 
Learning to use systems thinking, a holistic approach to problem solving that emphasizes contextual understanding, has helped me with team management, project planning, creative work, and even relationships. And for wicked problems like healthcare that confront business, nature, and society, it’s proving to be imperative.
So, where to even begin? “We have to invent boundaries for clarity and sanity,” advises systems thinking pioneer Donella Meadows. Sometimes a simple infographic works to tell the story.
Designing visual maps and models helps us immediately find connections and describe relationships. Creating models helps in seeing the big picture and one's place within it.
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Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, January 28, 2013 7:14 PM
I think "design" and "programming" are rushing at each other at light speed. Web pages will be made from branching if,then,else algorithms soon. Can't just drip paint on a canvas, so design's function will be making those algorithms make visual sense.
Gordon Shupe's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:38 AM

Info graphics don't really include digital photography, generally, but they are a fascinating way of displaying understanding, telling a story, and implying solutions.

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Can you trust an infographic?

Can you trust an infographic? | visual data | Scoop.it

A pictorial display of statistics, the infographic is a huge hit in the internet age.

But as one on rape figures has recently shown, they can be highly misleading.



A picture apocryphally speaks a thousand words, but its 21st-century counterpart – the infographic – often says much less. It's no surprise that the grabby and easily shared format has taken off in the internet era, and thlatest graphic to go viral is one on a tough and complex problem: rape and criminal justice...

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Crafting an Infographic narrative

Crafting an Infographic narrative | visual data | Scoop.it
Crafting an infographic narrative is an art. We detail the five elements of an editorial infographic's narrative and what each element aims to accomplish.

The best infographics are created when a story comes first. In a completed piece, every data point, piece of copy, and design element should support that story. This does not mean, however, that the story an individual or organization wants to tell will intuitively translate to the infographic medium.

Even in instances where all information and data exists on paper, the story may still require adaptation—crafting an infographic narrative to effectively communicate the story. While specific needs vary across applications of infographics, for editorial pieces, this process typically involves writing titles, introductory paragraphs, callouts, and conclusions—the pieces that weave the story together.

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Infographic: A Beautiful Calendar Designed Around 12 Different Types Of Measurement

Infographic: A Beautiful Calendar Designed Around 12 Different Types Of Measurement | visual data | Scoop.it

Calendars come in all sorts of forms, from the purely functional apps on our smartphones to the propped-up desktop ones that are mostly just a means of delivering a new Far Side joke every day. The Units of Measure Calendar Poster, as its name suggests, isn’t the most straightforward one to categorize. Or even one that’s easy to recognize as a calendar at all.


It doesn’t leave any room for you to jot down appointments, though it does include all 365 days, which you can notch off one by one. Mostly, it’s just an exquisite graphical compilation of 12 different units of measurement, a tightly packed collection of diagrams and conversion tables and other neat looking things of the sort.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 27, 2013 8:34 PM

Useful for thinking about measurement AND its limitations.  ~  D

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Bytes Sized: Information Storage, Visualized [infographic]

Bytes Sized: Information Storage, Visualized [infographic] | visual data | Scoop.it

We are living in the information age. The amount of information stored, transfered, and processed is growing at a staggering rate.


From the common megabyte to the mind-boggling yottabyte, this infographic serves as a guide to understanding the world of bytes!

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How to create a good infographic

How to create a good infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

Infographics have become quite popular nowadays since they help people find the right path in the chaos of the crowded online world.


So, it is understandable why designers appreciate this trend so much. However, it's always useful to learn a few tips and pieces of advice.

In this infographic and related article, you will get more details about design, typography, content, color and more...

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Ignasi Alcalde's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:11 AM

Crear Infografias Con Adobe pack.

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Infographic: Fonts + Colors that Drive the World's Top Brands

Infographic:  Fonts + Colors that Drive the World's Top Brands | visual data | Scoop.it

'We took a look at the world’s top 100 brands to determine which fonts, colors and formats were the most popular choices. Our infographic provides some good food for thought if you’ve hit a road block on your latest logo design.'

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Jon C's curator insight, July 10, 2013 8:26 PM

study of brands and colours

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A Brief Introduction to Typography – Infographic

A Brief Introduction to Typography – Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

Typography is a key element of any graphic design.

Any computer contains hundreds of pre-installed fonts to choose from and there are dozens of websites with thousands of free fonts, just some minimal knowledge and aesthetic taste.


This infographic intend to explain the basics of typography and disseminate the “best” ones that always work without too much complications.

Take short walk through this fascinating world...

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Georgia Gibbs Design's curator insight, April 19, 2013 8:05 PM

The lines in any face tell an interesting story and choosing the right type will help you to tell your own.

Greg Andrade's curator insight, October 11, 2013 10:09 PM

This is typography 101. These are some of the typography basics I teach my students. There are many other good articles pertaining to all types of design from architecture, furniture and of course graphic design.

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Infographic: Shutterstock’s Global Design Trends 2013

Infographic: Shutterstock’s Global Design Trends 2013 | visual data | Scoop.it
Explore Shutterstock's annual design trends infographic to find out what the biggest trends of the year will be.

Shutterstock licenses more images than anyone on the web, allowing for some pretty insightful trend forecasting.

After creating the first design-trends infographic last year; this year's incorporates increased data and images, and provides a more in-depth look at what to expect in the year ahead.
Check out the full infographic at the article link, then read on for 10 favorite takeaways...

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Minna Kilpeläinen's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:46 AM

Nice infographic about design trends in different countries. In some way these trends tend to be somewhat predictable.

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Infographic: An App That Maps The Web In Real Time

Infographic: An App That Maps The Web In Real Time | visual data | Scoop.it

Mankind loves making maps, and the world wide web, densely interconnected and phenomenally complex, always makes for a nice visual.

Typically these take the form of neon blobs floating against black backgrounds, like frames captured from old Winamp plug-ins, and while they’re always nice to look at, they don’t always do much in the way of helping us understand the massive global network we traverse every day. This latest effort, however, is a little different. Called simply Map of the Internet, it’s as informative as it is beautiful.


The map, which takes the form of a free app for Android and iOS, features 22,961 of the Internet’s biggest nodes--not individual websites, but the ISPs, universities, and other places that host them--joined by some 50,000 discrete connections. The app gives you two ways of surveying it all: geographically, on a globe, or by size, which rearranges the nodes into a loose column of points. Both views are interactive; instead of showing the Internet as a static neon blob, the app lets you explore the neon blob in the round, with all the familiar multitouch gestures. It may not look like the Google Maps app, but it instantly feels like it, which makes exploring the underbelly of the web all the easier...

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Infographic: 29 Ways To Be Creative

Infographic: 29 Ways To Be Creative | visual data | Scoop.it

Creativity is defined as the ability to create, but sometimes, we seem to lose that ability all of a sudden. 

Luckily, Jordan-based art director Islam Abudaoud has created a useful infographic that teaches us ways to stay creative. 

Titled ‘29 Ways To Stay Creative’, the infographic illustrates the “creative process and methods to keep a person moving forward and motivated to keep doing more”. 

For more information, check out the infographic at designtaxi.com...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 12, 2013 1:59 PM

These are some great common sense points.

Jacqui Hogan's curator insight, March 14, 2013 10:26 AM

EVERYone can be creative. 

Julien CHARLES's comment, May 16, 2013 7:40 AM
Really interesting and inspiring - Thx a lot.
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Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia | visual data | Scoop.it

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted--geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding...

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Data Analytics & Big Data: An infographic guide

Data Analytics & Big Data: An infographic guide | visual data | Scoop.it

The quick reference guide to big data and data analytics; from the definition to the history and future applications of big data.

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Aurélia-Claire Jaeger's curator insight, January 31, 2013 3:03 AM

Superbe infographie pour un résumé en image !

Shawn Neville's curator insight, January 31, 2013 10:49 AM

Big Data clarity from Deloitte....

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Infographic: Mining Pinterest To Discover Our Color Preferences, By Room

Infographic: Mining Pinterest To Discover Our Color Preferences, By Room | visual data | Scoop.it

Colour and Space is a project by designers Mie Frey Damgaard and Peter Ørntoft for decorative paint brand Jotun. It digs through Turkish Pinterest boards, analyzing two fairly basic but powerful categories: color and location. The results are placed into simple pie charts, showing preferred colors in places around the home like kids’ rooms (the faintest pink), living rooms (maize), and kitchens (white).


Colour and Space leverages big data to boil all that design into the simplest of actionable metrics--what color should my living room be? Because what you’re responding to in some random interior design photo may be the unique furnishings, but it’s just as often the color--that striking palette that’s all of a trip to Lowe’s away from reality.

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