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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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New Website Visualizes Human Activity in Cities Across the World

New Website Visualizes Human Activity in Cities Across the World | visual data | Scoop.it

The SENSEable City Laboratory at MIT has developed a new tool with Ericsson to better understand human behavior. "ManyCities" is a new website that "explores the spatio-temporal patterns of mobile phone activity in cities across the world," including LondonNew YorkLos Angeles and Hong Kong. Taking complex data and organizing it in a intuitive way, the application allows users to quickly visualize patterns of human movement within the urban context down to the neighborhood scale. You can imagine how useful a tool like this can be for urban planners or even daily commuters, especially once real time analytics come into play.

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Data Visualization 101: Scatter Plots

Data Visualization 101: Scatter Plots | visual data | Scoop.it

In our Data Visualization 101 series, we cover each chart type to help you sharpen your data visualization skills.Scatter plots have been called the “most versatile, polymorphic, and generally useful invention in the history of statistical graphics” (Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 2005).

That’s a big claim, but just as their name implies, they can take a confusing and scattered set of data and make sense of it. As such, these plots are much more than a visualization tool; they are a discovery tool. Let’s look at what makes the scatter plot so good...

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Marco Favero's curator insight, June 19, 2015 3:49 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Christopher Higgins's curator insight, July 18, 2015 6:17 AM

A quick history of graphing information and how scatter plots are unique from other ways of graphing in more than one way.  A great visual of the different types of relationships that are easily identified on a scatter plot, highlighting why scatter plots are so useful to understand relationships between two different variables.  

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Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization

Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization | visual data | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how many meteors have hit Earth? The Meteoritical Society is doing its best to keep track. And Javier de la Torre, co-founder of CartoDB, is helping us see the pure volume of hits (into the tens of thousands). His interactive visualization shows a heatmap of hits all over the world, letting you explore where and when meteorites fell, as well as their size and classification.

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Laura Brown's curator insight, May 25, 2015 4:14 PM

I wonder how much of this is biased by the lack of reporting (or over reporting) in some areas. 

AnalyticsInnovations's curator insight, June 5, 2015 7:09 AM

Example of data scientist faux pas:  Meteors choose to fall so unevenly...!

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A Single Day on the London Tube Condensed Into a 2-minute Visualization

A Single Day on the London Tube Condensed Into a 2-minute Visualization | visual data | Scoop.it

Everyday an average of 3.5 million people ride the London tube. Where is everyone going, and when are the busiest times? 

Developer Will Gallia was curious to see it visualized, so he gathered a day’s worth of data and created a timelapse visualization...

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18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past

18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past | visual data | Scoop.it

In 1939, visitors stood in line for hours to see the Futurama exhibit at the New York World's Fair, a detailed model imagining 1960s America. Complete with half a million tiny buildings and a million handmade miniature trees, it also visualized a network of highways crossing the country. And while the interstate system probably would have been built without it, it's arguable that the visualization—sponsored by GM—helped the roads happen.

A new exhibit called the Future City, up now at London's Royal Institute of British Architects, looks at how drawings and models of futuristic cities can shape the cities that actually are built.

"Visualizations of future cities contribute to our collective imagination," says Nick Dunn from Lancaster University "They provide us with visionary projections of how we might live. Reexamining these from a historical perspective can give us new insights and greater understanding of the developments and patterns that shape the present, and in turn, their implications for our future."

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Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | visual data | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
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Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 2015 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 2015 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 2015 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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Visualization + Physical Charts: Making Data More Accessible

Visualization + Physical Charts: Making Data More Accessible | visual data | Scoop.it

Physical versions of pie and bar charts and a tapestry that represents human voices are attempts by designers to make data more accessible

With life saturated by screen-based information, designers are presenting information in more tangible ways. As part of the V&A’s recent Digital Design Weekend, several projects opted for low-tech ways of representing data.

Among these was Physical Charts, a project by Microsoft Research Cambridge for the Tenison Road community project that set out to encourage civic engagement with locally generated data, such as surveys on traffic and air quality. The result is a mechanical pie chart made from slices of sheet plastic attached to a central motor and bar chart constructed from motorised measuring tapes, both of which animate to display real-time data.

The intention, says project designer David Sweeney, was to create something easily legible, but with a sense of magic and theatre. “We wanted to find a way to communicate data back to the people generating it, but in a digestible way, so they were connected to it,” he says...

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Nicholas Felton Had 95,000 Conversations Last Year And Mapped Each One

Nicholas Felton Had 95,000 Conversations Last Year And Mapped Each One | visual data | Scoop.it
Life quantification pioneer Nicholas Felton's latest annual report is his most ambitious to date.

For the last nine years, Nicholas Felton--who you may know best for inspiring the Facebook timeline or creating the life-logging app Reporter--has been recording some aspect of almost every moment of his life. And each year, he turns this data into a elegant, printed book that visualizes the year called The Feltron Report...

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, September 26, 2014 5:29 PM

The Felton report is a beautiful peeping hole into someone's life when they start to quantify themselves. Focussed on fairly benign problem space - conversations during the year - it shows what possibilities, both good and bad, lie within the quantified-self movement which is bound to explode with the availability of Apple watch and others alike.


Of course it brings tremendous opportunities for monitoring someone's life in order to improve it. Whether it is by measuring exercice (as we do today with step trackers) or heart rate or glucose levels in order to improve health or medical diagnosis. In the context of business, organizations can monitor employees in order to minimize injuries or prevent illness and time loss due to sickness.


There is of course the dark side, where all this data, when made available without our consent or knowledge, can be used to track us and restrict our privacy or our rights. This is already happening in the contexte of government surveillance (ie. Edward Snowden http://sco.lt/5k4B29) or internet browsing tracking (ie. data brokers http://sco.lt/79yNZh)

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A Visual History of Satellites

A Visual History of Satellites | visual data | Scoop.it
The 'extended urbanization' of space.


Right now, there are about 1,100 satellites whizzing above our heads performing various functions like observation, communication, and spying. There are roughly another 2,600 doing nothing, as they died or were turned off a long time ago.

How did each of these satellites get up there? And what nations are responsible for sending up the bulk of them?

The answers come in the form of this bewitching visualization of satellite launches from 1957 – the year Russia debuted Sputnik 1 – to the present day. (The animation starts at 2:10; be sure to watch in HD.) Launch sites pop up as yellow circles as the years roll by, sending rockets, represented as individual lines, flying into space with one or more satellites aboard.

More information at the link.

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Patrice Mitrano's curator insight, May 27, 2014 8:07 AM

Frise chronologique très impressionnante et détaillée (par type d'orbite de satellites) !

paul babicki's curator insight, July 25, 2014 7:21 PM

An incredible graph!

http://netiquetteiq.blogspot.com

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Virtual reality: the 1990s technology set to change the design world

Virtual reality: the 1990s technology set to change the design world | visual data | Scoop.it
As Facebook buys Oculus and Sony reveals its own VR device, Dezeen investigates what the resurgence of this old school technology means for designers.


Oculus VR was already big before Facebook bought the virtual reality headset maker for $2 billion. "Oculus has the potential to be the most social platform ever," said Mark Zuckerberg in a call to Facebook's investors, while his announcement post painted a picture of the world donning headsets to watch tennis, study in classrooms and consult with doctors.

Facebook sees Oculus Rift as a chance to profoundly transform communication, and to the gaming industry it's a generational leap in electronic entertainment. But there's more to virtual reality. It's as much a creative tool for designers and architects, as it is a new medium for designers to explore, and a close and personal way of experiencing the creations of others...

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Jed Fisher's curator insight, April 7, 2014 3:55 AM

Another nice Oculus article focusing on using it for Design.

Here are two others on the recent sales which are worth a quick read.

Musings on the Oculus sale
http://www.raphkoster.com/2014/03/25/musings-on-the-oculus-sale/

and

Oculus was the future of gaming. Now it’s the future of Facebook.
http://boingboing.net/2014/03/25/oculus-vr-could-have-changed-b.html

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This Gorgeous Visualization Is What 24 Hours Of Air Traffic Looks Like

This Gorgeous Visualization Is What 24 Hours Of Air Traffic Looks Like | visual data | Scoop.it

Have you ever found yourself sitting on your flight, pondering your very existence in the grand scheme of things? Not necessarily on a spiritual level, but in terms of how small we really are. This stunning video by NATS.aero represents each plane flight as a tiny, speck, like a migration of glowing fireflies.

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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 12, 2014 2:53 AM

Have you ever found yourself sitting on your flight, pondering your very existence in the grand scheme of things? Not necessarily on a spiritual level, but in terms of how small we really are. This stunning video by NATS.aero represents each plane flight as a tiny, speck, like a migration of glowing fireflies.

Patrice Mitrano's curator insight, March 12, 2014 6:02 AM

La vidéo montre des données à plusieurs date : le 21 juin pour le Royaume-Uni et le 28 juillet pour le reste de l'Europe. Quelques données transtlatlantiques ont aussi été sélectionnées.

Voir l'article : http://nats.aero/blog/2014/03/europe-24-air-traffic-data-visualisation/

 

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The Most-Visited Countries in the World, Visualized

The Most-Visited Countries in the World, Visualized | visual data | Scoop.it

If you've ever wondered which country was the most popular tourist destination, wonder no longer—this map shows which countries get the most visitors every year.

It might surprise you to find out that France is the most popular destination, welcoming in 81,400,000 visitors every years. That's nearly 20 million more visitors annually than the U.S. which comes second.


Find more information at the link.

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London's future skyline captured in new visualiations

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations | visual data | Scoop.it

This series of images by architectural rendering studio Hayes Davidson envisages how London's skyline might look in 20 years time.

Over 200 towers with a height of 20 storeys or greater are planned in the UK capital over the next two decades and Hayes Davidson has visualised how these new buildings will appear alongside existing skyscrapers such as Renzo Piano's The Shard and Norman Foster's The Gherkin.


The images were created for an exhibition opening later this year at New London Architecture (NLA) entitled London's Growing... Up! which will chart the growth of tall building construction in London since the 1960s and look at the impact skyscrapers will have on the city in the near future.

"As London's population gets bigger and bigger, and new development for London takes place within the constraints of the green belt, we have to increase the density of the city," said Peter Murray, who is chairman of NLA and the exhibition curator.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:30 PM

Future city planners and developers will be using some amazing tools.

Christina Guenther's curator insight, February 11, 2014 12:24 AM

I have never been to London but their future is looking very attractive. 

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Colorful Data Visualizations from the 1800s

Colorful Data Visualizations from the 1800s | visual data | Scoop.it

Good data visualization helps us see the meaning in data, hence it has always been an important tool. Today computers crunch numbers and design programs help us visualize data in many ways, from infographics to interactives. But in a time before those tools, designers were creating truly beautiful work that should be an inspiration to anyone working today.

These maps are pulled from the 1870 edition of the Statistical Atlas of the United States, visualizing data from the 1870 census. Each cover a different aspect of the rapidly changing America. While the book is full of detailed visualizations, these maps are particularly notable. The choice of visual presentation and vibrant color palettes make them enticing (and a little surprising) seeing as they’re from the staunch Victorian era.
These just prove that no matter how tedious the subject, you can always inject a little creativity.
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Michael Pecirno's Minimalist Maps Reveal the Hidden Landscapes of America

Michael Pecirno's Minimalist Maps Reveal the Hidden Landscapes of America | visual data | Scoop.it

London-based designer Michael Pecirno creates minimalist maps in an ongoing project to understand the landscape of the world. His work is exploratory, using a decidedly narrow set of data to see the unique patterns it creates across the land. In each case, the map is drawn with data points, leaving traditional physical and political borders to our imagination.

Each map visualizes the lower 48 states of the US, using a wealth of information from the USDA to detail specific features like urbanization, fields planted with corn, the spread of grasslands, or bodies of water. The map reveals a new and insightful view of America’s composition.

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What the Internet Thinks About—in an Interactive Infographic

What the Internet Thinks About—in an Interactive Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it
What does the Internet care about? What articles do we share the most? Using the data from the Ahrefs Content Explorer, the people at Funders and Founders 
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Emilio Ruano's curator insight, May 4, 2015 1:17 PM

At least, the concern about equality, energy and social welfare is there. I like the last one about engineers tho. Hahaha.

jose antonio gabelas's curator insight, May 15, 2015 3:33 AM

añada su visión ...

Mackenzie Hamilton's curator insight, October 13, 2015 8:36 AM

I think this article is awesome because they use data visualization to show what people share the most, visit the most, and search the most. Data is everywhere and people are using it everyday and sometimes don't even think about it.

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World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time | visual data | Scoop.it

Temple University researchers recently put together the world's largest tree of life visualized across time. The family tree of living and extinct organisms encompasses 50,000 species—only a fraction of the world's history of life—and would easily take up hundreds of pages if laid out linearly. To fit their work onto a printed page, the researchers, led by evolutionary biologist S. Blair Hedges, instead decided to visualize the data as a spiral.

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Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected

Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected | visual data | Scoop.it
NASA visualizes the 22,000 tons of life-giving dust that flows between Africa and South America.
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5 Realistic Rendering Styles and the Future of Visualization

Architectural Visualization is a harsh mistress. We are seduced by it, but sometimes it leads us astray. While modeling, rendering, and post-production capabilities are always increasing, the realism that we see in renderings is not always proportionate to our ability to produce it. In other words, some renderings don't even look try to look real anymore; they are often dramatized until they look like science fiction or a romantic painting.

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New York's 2018 Skyline Revealed in New Visualizations

New York's 2018 Skyline Revealed in New Visualizations | visual data | Scoop.it

These new renderings show what New York's skyline will look like in 2018, when many of the city's new tall skyscrapers will be complete.

The images were created by visualisation studio CityRealty to show how Jean Nouvel's proposed 320-metre skyscraper at 53 West 53rd Street – now under construction – will sit amongst the numerous other towers underway along the south-west of Central Park. The images also show 432 Park Avenue by Rafael Viñoly, which will soon become New York's tallest residential tower, as well as Fosters' new tower for 610 Lexington Avenuethe recently completed One World Trade Center by SOM and the first of the 16 towers proposed at Hudsons Yards.

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Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System

Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System | visual data | Scoop.it

You’re probably familiar with visualizations comparing the relative size of the planets, but this visualization is different.


xkcd has created a map-like look at the solid surfaces of the Solar System, stitched together like countries on a single continent. The graphic includes planets, moons, asteroids and dwarf planets, but leaves out dust, small rocks and large gaseous planets like Jupiter and Saturn. It’s a revealing look at the size of our neighbors...

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See The Ancient Roots Of Modern Infographics In "Book Of Trees"

See The Ancient Roots Of Modern Infographics In "Book Of Trees" | visual data | Scoop.it
Manuel Lima's The Book of Trees takes us back to the earliest, nature-inspired frameworks of data visualization.

The first great Age of Infographics took root 1,000 years ago inspired variously by quests to categorize scientific knowledge, organize Greco-Roman scholarship and, weirdly, trace family bloodlines so that aristocrats could avoid incest as defined by Vatican rule-makers.


Manuel Lima's illustrated history The Book of Trees (Princeton Architectural Press) chronicles how Medieval-era designers instinctively used trunk and branch diagrams to impose order on the explosion of new data. One millennium later, tree-based graphics continue to pack considerable punch as information delivery systems.

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Massive Visualizations at CeBIT Depict The Scale of “Big Data”

Massive Visualizations at CeBIT Depict The Scale of “Big Data” | visual data | Scoop.it

At this year’s CeBIT computer trade fair in Hannover, Germany, the world’s most impressive and eccentric new technology has been on display. But the massive data visualizations on display at the fair’s CODE_n exhibition in Hall 16 have turned heads with their artistry, execution and scale.

CODE_n bills itself as an international initiative for digital pioneers, innovators and groundbreaking startups. This year, it is focusing on big data. The elegantly complex visualizations that fill the exhibition hall’s more than 3,000 meters of wall space were designed to physically depict data on this immense scale.

More details at the link.

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14 World-Changing Data Visualizations from the Last 4 Centuries

14 World-Changing Data Visualizations from the Last 4 Centuries | visual data | Scoop.it

Science may be difficult, but it doesn’t have to be ugly. These images, from a new exhibit at the British Library, show how beautiful scientific data can be.

The exhibit features classic illustrations dating to 1603, including John Snow’s map of London’s SoHo that’s credited with revealing a contaminated water pump as the source of a 1854 cholera outbreak. There also are beautiful modern visualizations of data from satellites and gene sequencers. The exhibit, Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight, runs through May 26.

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21 Examples of 'Real Life' Physical Infographics

21 Examples of 'Real Life' Physical Infographics | visual data | Scoop.it

Real life data visualization is to be an upcoming trend, called physical infographics or real world visualization. They visualize data with real objects, often combined with typography.

Real Life Infographics are different than other inforgraphics in that they rely much more on photographs instead of a purely digital medium. Moving away from the Everthing-Is-Possible-Unicorn-Utopia of Illustrator is an interesting limitation, as well as a simplifying one. As designers we like to come up with creative ways to display information that will still blow your mind, despite any technical limitations. The real world isn't perfect, and therefore it may not be as accurate as abstract shapes like graph bars. Even though these visualizations still strive for accuracy, you will notice that the context of these graphics will become much more important than precision.

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Vivalist's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:39 AM

I have a thing for "real life" data viz.

nydia teter's curator insight, February 8, 2014 7:47 PM

Brilliant use of data and materials to create a 3D story. Wow.