visual data
68.1K views | +1 today
Follow
visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Crafting an Infographic narrative

Crafting an Infographic narrative | visual data | Scoop.it
Crafting an infographic narrative is an art. We detail the five elements of an editorial infographic's narrative and what each element aims to accomplish.

The best infographics are created when a story comes first. In a completed piece, every data point, piece of copy, and design element should support that story. This does not mean, however, that the story an individual or organization wants to tell will intuitively translate to the infographic medium.

Even in instances where all information and data exists on paper, the story may still require adaptation—crafting an infographic narrative to effectively communicate the story. While specific needs vary across applications of infographics, for editorial pieces, this process typically involves writing titles, introductory paragraphs, callouts, and conclusions—the pieces that weave the story together.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design

Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design | visual data | Scoop.it

My classmates and I are in the Design for Social Innovation program because we identified problems in our communities, companies, or cultures and are keen to figure them out. But before talking about any solution or outcome, one must first frame the problem—by thoughtfully examining the system it’s part of to understand where and how to get involved.

 
Learning to use systems thinking, a holistic approach to problem solving that emphasizes contextual understanding, has helped me with team management, project planning, creative work, and even relationships. And for wicked problems like healthcare that confront business, nature, and society, it’s proving to be imperative.
So, where to even begin? “We have to invent boundaries for clarity and sanity,” advises systems thinking pioneer Donella Meadows. Sometimes a simple infographic works to tell the story.
Designing visual maps and models helps us immediately find connections and describe relationships. Creating models helps in seeing the big picture and one's place within it.
more...
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, January 28, 2013 7:14 PM
I think "design" and "programming" are rushing at each other at light speed. Web pages will be made from branching if,then,else algorithms soon. Can't just drip paint on a canvas, so design's function will be making those algorithms make visual sense.
Gordon Shupe's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:38 AM

Info graphics don't really include digital photography, generally, but they are a fascinating way of displaying understanding, telling a story, and implying solutions.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Data as Narrative at SXSW Interactive

Data as Narrative at SXSW Interactive | visual data | Scoop.it

Nicola Hughes, at The Guardian, reminded us that until now the “roles of narrators, curators, and computers have been very differentiated, but now it is super smeared and undefined.” She also reminded us that “algorithms we use to sort through data are not apolitical. What you find on Google are things that are interesting to the public, but not necessarily in the public interest.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Everything Sings: Making the Case for a New Cartography

Everything Sings: Making the Case for a New Cartography | visual data | Scoop.it
What Ira Glass has to do with atlas antagonism, or what plotting carved pumpkins reveals about place.

The most intimate infographics of all may be maps, those images that tell of our complicated relationships to place, bounded by time. Or at least, this is just one of the interesting arguments made by the book Everything Sings: Maps for a Narrative Atlas, a beautiful exploration of a small North Carolina neighborhood that also provides a platform for much larger ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Which infographic is right for you?

Which infographic is right for you? | visual data | Scoop.it

That’s right, there’s more to infographics than a scrolling image full of facts and figures. Different types of infographics are consumed differently.

The right kind of infographic should match your data to your narrative and ensure that people take away your message after reading it.

While infographics may not come in that many shapes or sizes (600 x 1,800 pixels is the norm), that doesn’t mean there’s a stock standard infographic for you.  

Use the flowchart to help you decide which infographic is right for you...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infographic: 50 People Shaping The Future Of Design

Infographic: 50 People Shaping The Future Of Design | visual data | Scoop.it
In our design issue last year, the Co.Design 50 laid out 50 of the most influential designers in America. This year, as a sequel, we took it upon ourselves to highlight 50 people who are shaping the future of design.

That sounds like a funny task. But our staff was after people pushing the boundaries of their discipline into promising new directions. 

We think that if you look at the ideas each one of these people represents, you’ll find a broad narrative about how design is changing--how businesses are using design in surprising ways, how our interactions with computers and handheld devices are evolving, and how high-tech processes are working their ways into once-static disciplines.

To map out all of these people for our October 2012 issue, we tapped Ben Gibson, the designer behind Popchart Labs. I think you’ll agree that Ben did a superb job, and came up with an elegant solution for charting all of the myriad disciplines that each of these remarkable people touch upon. Enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Design Behind 'How Many Really' | BERG

The Design Behind 'How Many Really' | BERG | visual data | Scoop.it

'How Big Really' is a solid, easy to digest punch of information that translates unknown quantities into something instantly recognisable. 'How Many Really' is the second part of the experiment, and this is a little write up of the design process.

How many really is an entirely different beast to How big really. Rather than each dimension being a solid, one shot hit, the value is in backing up simple visuals with interesting narratives. We spent almost as much time on the written aspect of stories as we did on the aesthetics and interaction. I hope it gives a little context to numbers and figures we often take for granted. Please do have a browse around!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Databases | Digital Humanities Specialist

Visualizing Databases | Digital Humanities Specialist | visual data | Scoop.it

Summaries and statistics drawn from within the structure of the database are not enough. If there is to be any real grappling with the database as an culturally-embedded construct, then it has to be done in a manner that reveals the data, the model and the population simultaneously.

more...
luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 9:11 AM

I’ve become quite the fan of Gephi, lately, and received a good-natured challenge by one of my colleagues, which went something like, “Why is a everything a network with you, now?”  Obviously, in the case of social network-like phenomena, such as mapping collaboration in the Digital Humanities with the DH@Stanford graph–network theory and network language (whether visual or theoretical) make sense.  Network analytical tools like Gephi are also only a short step away from spatial analytical tools, like ArcGIS, many of which are used to ask questions about geographic networks and not about the kind of continuous data found in topography.