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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Projection Mapping Fills Cambridge’s 16th-Century Chapel with Stars

Projection Mapping Fills Cambridge’s 16th-Century Chapel with Stars | visual data | Scoop.it
Attendees to a recent fundraising event inside University of Cambridge’s 16th-century chapel were treated to a spectacular display far above. The Gothic arches of King’s College Chapel were transformed into a canvas for mesmerizing views of stars, foliage, psychedelic clouds and university crests. The work was created by French projection artist Miguel Chevalier.

The visuals were generated in real-time, contributing to the theme of each speaker. During a presentation on black holes by Stephen Hawking, the room was transformed into a vision of deep space. Other topics touched on subjects ranging from health, to Africa, biology and physics.
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Digitally Mapping Brazil’s most important monument

Digitally Mapping Brazil’s most important monument | visual data | Scoop.it

Digitizing Brazil’s most important monument is no small feat. Located atop the 700 meter Corcovado Mountain the Christ the Redeemer statue towers over Rio de Janeiro, at 38 meters of height and with a 28 meter arm span. Traditional 3D scanning technologies are unuseable due to the size and location of the statue, the difficult accessibility and challenging weather conditions.

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Before and After: Mapping LA 100 Years Ago and Today

Before and After: Mapping LA 100 Years Ago and Today | visual data | Scoop.it

'Any map-lovers looking to lose track of time for a few hours should say hello to the newly-arrived USGS Historical Topographic Map Explorer, which allows users access to a treasure trove of maps of cities across the nation and lets users load multiple maps and toggle the transparency of each, so you can see the old map overlaid on the map of today. Go back to the turn-of-the-century maps of Los Angeles to find the old ranchos, or to the '40s and '50s to see old Pacific Electric lines. Compare pre- and post-Dodger Stadium maps of Elysian Park; see cartographic evidence of the lake at Westlake Park before it was split in half by Wilshire Boulevard, or of Los Feliz spelled Los Felis. It's all here, for the casual, time-sucking perusal of the public. We've collected a few of our favorite greater Los Angeles details into a handful of colorful before-and-afters below. We'll look closer at specific neighborhoods in the coming days...'

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Minimalist projection mapping & real-time graphics

Minimalist projection mapping & real-time graphics | visual data | Scoop.it

Portal 1.0 is a low-key-yet-awesome experiment in real-time graphics.

A new video by Raven Kwon called Portal 1.0 is an experiment in real-time graphics getting projected on to the surfaces of four cardboard boxes. The project was made using Processing and is an updated version of the artist's prior test work, which can be watched at the link.

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How the U.S. Maps the World's Most Disputed Territories

How the U.S. Maps the World's Most Disputed Territories | visual data | Scoop.it

When the United States decides to recognize a new government, or an existing country changes its name, Leo Dillon and his team at the State Department spring into action.

Dillon heads the Geographical Information Unit, which is responsible for ensuring the boundaries and names on government maps reflect U.S. policy. The team also keeps an eye on border skirmishes and territorial disputes throughout the world and makes maps that are used in negotiating treaties and truces. 

Dillon’s been at the State Department since 1986, and he says his job remains as fun as ever. “The landscape of political geography is constantly changing,” he said. “Every day I come in here and there’s something new.” We spoke with Dillon to learn more about it...

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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | visual data | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:57 PM

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

Sean de Basti's curator insight, August 27, 2013 10:31 AM

do you know where everything is located?

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Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet

Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet | visual data | Scoop.it

It wasn’t malicious. The file itself was the size of a small JPEG. It was given the absolute lowest priority. And it was set to self-destruct if anything went wrong. But this small file allowed one single hacker to measure the Internet activity of nearly half a million connected devices around the world, then share the results with everyone.

How was this even possible? The "hacker" barely hacked anything. In reality, they gained access to all these systems because each had the default "root" set as a password. With this access in hand, they ran several tests focusing on Internet structure and activity. And what they created from all this data is a spectacular map that captures a day in the life of the Internet (and all of its users).

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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 11, 2013 3:17 AM
Wonderful
Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:18 PM

Creative power: hacking at the end of the world!

 

Using "root" as universal key :))

Kristin Newton's curator insight, May 11, 2013 10:10 PM

The Internet is connecting us day by day in amazing ways.

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Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia | visual data | Scoop.it

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted--geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding...

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The Intersection of Geography & Data: 2012's Best Maps

The Intersection of Geography & Data: 2012's Best Maps | visual data | Scoop.it

It's been an eventful year for cartography.


Development and disaster continue to mold the physical world, but for mapmakers, keeping up with geographic changes is busy work -- a tweaked direction here, a freeway exit there. It's very important busy work, as we learned this September when Apple reminded us not to take a good map for granted.


The intersection of geography and data, though, is just beginning to fill out. Together with interactive functions like sliders, timelines, and embedded information, the best new maps resemble Rand McNally's about as much as movies look like photographs. Creating an accurate representation of geography and infrastructure is only the tip of the iceberg.

What happens when you integrate statistics about rising seas, gang affiliations, metaphors and beer?


A whole new understanding of the way the world works. And some pretty sweet maps. Without further ado, the top favorite maps of the year...


(visit the article link for the maps and associated links)

Lauren Moss's insight:

A gallery of different approaches to visualizing topics covering a broad range of data through cartography and mapping...

Examples are supplemented with a summary of the intent, process + graphics of each map, noting the elements that make for successful representations of specific concepts, ideas + data.

From urban issues to voting trends to navigation apps and software, maps are tools that can be highly effective in data visualization, as evidenced in this cartographic collection curated by the Atlantic Cities.

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How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything

How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything | visual data | Scoop.it
An exclusive look inside Ground Truth, the secretive program to build the world's best accurate maps.


Behind every Google Map, there is a much more complex map that's the key to queries but hidden from view. The deep map contains the logic of places: their no-left-turns and freeway on-ramps, speed limits and traffic conditions. This is the data that Google uses to navigate you from point A to point B.

Last week, Google showed me the internal map and demonstrated how it was built- the first time the company has let anyone see how the project it calls GT, or "Ground Truth," actually works.

Google opened up at a key moment in its evolution. The company began as an online search company, but then the mobile world exploded. Now, where you're searching from has become almost as important as what you're searching for. Google responded by creating an operating system, brand, and ecosystem that has become the only significant rival to Apple's iOS.

And for good reason. If Google's mission is to organize all the world's information, the most important challenge -- far larger than indexing the web -- is to take the world's physical information and make it accessible and useful...


Read the entire article for a fascinating look at how Google utilizes mapping systems, geo data, mobile technology, and visual representation to manage massive amounts of data from varying sources, including one of the most important to the success of Google Maps- human intelligence.

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Beneath Every City Is A Labyrinth of Last Names

Beneath Every City Is A Labyrinth of Last Names | visual data | Scoop.it
Behind a city of data, an ocean of names.

This is what families look like in the age of big data. The cartographer James Cheshire has looked at over 900 different areas of London and graphed the most popular last names of each. He's then placed those over a map of the city, made it all zoomable and interactive, and highlighted which 15 last names -- and nationalities -- dominate each area...

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Mariana Soffer's comment, August 8, 2012 5:41 AM
great post Lauren Moss
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Map orientation: When true north is NOT at the top

Map orientation: When true north is NOT at the top | visual data | Scoop.it
We got an excellent comment from a reader this week about maps that are not drawn with true north at the top.

 

We've all be 'turned around' when navigating in semi-familiar or unfamiliar territory.  How to we reorient ourselves?  When the map is NOT facing north, there typically better be a compelling reason that will help the map users to orient themselves to their particular spatial circumstances (oftentime they are reference maps for tourists).  Do you prefer maps to always face north?  Why or why not?  What does this say about our mental maps and spatial thinking patterns? 


Via Seth Dixon
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Location heat maps: show travel time data clearly and simply

Location heat maps: show travel time data clearly and simply | visual data | Scoop.it
Mapumental location heat maps: centre the map anywhere in the UK, then show users how quickly they could get to work, school, town, or places of interest.
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Mapping The San Francisco of Yesteryear

Mapping The San Francisco of Yesteryear | visual data | Scoop.it

Built with almost no regard for the hills that dominate its landscape, San Francisco’s grid like street layout and near vertical roads are unique in the world of cities. The “City by the Bay” really started growing after the California gold rush started booming in the late 1840’s, so by the time the gorgeous map featured here was made in 1912, the city looked remarkably like it does today. What was missing were many of the attractions the city is now best known for: noticeably absent is Pier 39 and the very crooked section of Lombard Street. Also yet to be built: the Golden Gate Bridge...

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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | visual data | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...

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Bhopkins's curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:53 AM

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

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Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System

Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System | visual data | Scoop.it

You’re probably familiar with visualizations comparing the relative size of the planets, but this visualization is different.


xkcd has created a map-like look at the solid surfaces of the Solar System, stitched together like countries on a single continent. The graphic includes planets, moons, asteroids and dwarf planets, but leaves out dust, small rocks and large gaseous planets like Jupiter and Saturn. It’s a revealing look at the size of our neighbors...

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Hot Spots: Mapping the World's Most Photographed Locations

Hot Spots: Mapping the World's Most Photographed Locations | visual data | Scoop.it

Sightsmap forms an aggregation of the most photographed buildings by integrating Google's Panoramio, which allows users to tag a location or attraction within their photo.


In a colorful gradient of purples, reds, and yellows, the website reveals the most photographed places around the globe. Broad patches of purple coincide with a lesser amount of photographs, while smaller clusters of yellow reveal the locations where people can't seem to put their cameras down. Unsurprisingly, the densest areas of yellow are the world's most popular tourist spots − including New York City and cities across Europe such as Istanbul.

Sightsmap is more than just a map of tourist destinations however; it also shows the close connection between architecture and what inspires people to take photos. Sightsmap forms an aggregation of the most photographed buildings by integrating Google's Panoramio, which allows users...

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Datascaping And Designing With Information

Datascaping And Designing With Information | visual data | Scoop.it

DataAppeal software provides an alternative to complex mapping tools through an easy to use, web-based GIS application that renders typical data files into beautifully designed multi-dimensional maps and datascapes instantly. For architects, landscape architects, urban planners and designers of the built form, the application is a great tool to utilize evidence-based information to expose new site patterns, to provide alternative 3D modes of mapping for communication purposes, and to aid in the initiation of master plan designs.

It’s also a refreshing way to visually engage professional and students with their site-based data...

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burlysand's comment, September 24, 2013 3:28 AM
Pretty simple..
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How a Map Is Like an Op-Ed: Geography as a Storytelling Tool

How a Map Is Like an Op-Ed: Geography as a Storytelling Tool | visual data | Scoop.it

Thanks to the open data movement and Google Map Maker, anyone with a computer can create a map. These maps tell a story, but it's a subjective one. And while that can be a powerful tool, it can also skew perspectives and cloud a debate.

"We should really teach people to read maps in that way," says Laura Kurgan, an associate professor of architecture at Columbia University. "Maps are arguments, just like a piece of written journalism is an argument."

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A Visualization of Global “Brain Drain” in Science Inspired by Abstract Art

A Visualization of Global “Brain Drain” in Science Inspired by Abstract Art | visual data | Scoop.it

Mapping the global flow of scientific talent by way of Mondrian and Kandinsky.


After their wonderful visual timeline of the future based on famous fiction and visual history of the Nobel Prize, Italian information visualization designer Giorgia Lupi and her team at Accurat are back with another exclusive English version of a piece originally designed for La Lettura, the Sunday literary supplement of an Italian newspaper— this time exploring the phenomenon of global “brain drain” in science, with an eye towards understanding the reasons why researchers might choose to leave their countries of origin and pursue careers elsewhere.

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Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design

Solving Wicked Problems: Using Systems Thinking in Design | visual data | Scoop.it

My classmates and I are in the Design for Social Innovation program because we identified problems in our communities, companies, or cultures and are keen to figure them out. But before talking about any solution or outcome, one must first frame the problem—by thoughtfully examining the system it’s part of to understand where and how to get involved.

 
Learning to use systems thinking, a holistic approach to problem solving that emphasizes contextual understanding, has helped me with team management, project planning, creative work, and even relationships. And for wicked problems like healthcare that confront business, nature, and society, it’s proving to be imperative.
So, where to even begin? “We have to invent boundaries for clarity and sanity,” advises systems thinking pioneer Donella Meadows. Sometimes a simple infographic works to tell the story.
Designing visual maps and models helps us immediately find connections and describe relationships. Creating models helps in seeing the big picture and one's place within it.
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Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, January 28, 2013 7:14 PM
I think "design" and "programming" are rushing at each other at light speed. Web pages will be made from branching if,then,else algorithms soon. Can't just drip paint on a canvas, so design's function will be making those algorithms make visual sense.
Gordon Shupe's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:38 AM

Info graphics don't really include digital photography, generally, but they are a fascinating way of displaying understanding, telling a story, and implying solutions.

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Map as Art

Map as Art | visual data | Scoop.it

There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, or sculpture, these artists have turned to creative ways to express themselves through maps.


This series of cartographically-inspired art works changes how we look at maps.  Some of these artists also make us think of places that are on the Earth as explicitly "mappable" features.  I think the Google Maps push-pin in the city center is my favorite.  Which do you prefer? 


Tags: art, mapping, place, cartography


Via Seth Dixon
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GeoMapGames's curator insight, March 4, 2014 12:47 AM

Amazing map art! I like Google Maps push-pin in the city center :)
Which do you prefer?  #geomapgames

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Aerial Data Visualisation Reveals Life In The United States

Aerial Data Visualisation Reveals Life In The United States | visual data | Scoop.it

PBS is exploring the hidden patterns and rhythms that make America work. They are taking this data and visualizing it in a series being called, America Revealed...

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Visualizing the New York Subway System's 'Data Exhaust'

Visualizing the New York Subway System's 'Data Exhaust' | visual data | Scoop.it
What do 1.6 billion mass transit trips through the city look like?

In 2011, MetroCards were swiped through the turnstiles of the New York City subway system 1.6 billion times. Each swipe was, itself, a data point, and it came connected to myriad others about the day of the week, the subway stop, the identity of the rider. Did the commuter have a student MetroCard, or a senior citizen one? What about a seven-day pass, or a 30-day one?

As a sheer byproduct of moving so many people around the city, the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority constantly churns out information like this. And, thanks to the rapidly expanding movement for open data, it’s now available to the public – if we can just begin to figure out what to do with it.

"This is such a big sprawling thing," says John Geraci, who heads the New York office of faberNovel, a Paris-based company that consults with cities, non-profits and private companies on how to act more like startups. "This data was not created really with this in mind, with the idea of being seen by people. It’s like data exhaust."

Geraci’s firm has just created a data visualization site playing with all of this information to at least begin to tempt our imaginations on what we could learn from it...

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Seven Tools for Creating Data Visualizations

Seven Tools for Creating Data Visualizations | visual data | Scoop.it

Digital tools have faciliated an easier way to visually represent complex data and information in ways at are logical and intuitive.  This blog post outlines tools that students can use (read: free!) along with basic tutorials to demonstrate their functionalities. 


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Fabryka Prezentacji's comment, February 5, 2012 8:05 AM
Great one, thanks. Re-shared.