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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Google adds London to its growing list of 3D-mapped cities

Google adds London to its growing list of 3D-mapped cities | visual data | Scoop.it

Google Maps has now added London to an impressive roster of 3D-mapped cities that also includes Paris, Rome, New York and Los Angeles. By piecing together 45-degree aerial imagery, the Google mapping team has been able to recreate entire cities.

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Classic Paintings of London On Top of Google Street Views of the City

Classic Paintings of London On Top of Google Street Views of the City | visual data | Scoop.it

If you walk the streets of London often enough, it’s easy to forget the massive amount of history that surrounds you. But, just looking up can send your head spinning into the past again. From the giant dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, to the towers of Westminster Abby and the quiet banks of the Thames in Greenwich, almost every view of the old city is filled with stories from the past. Redditor shystone recently when on an internet odyssey using classic paintings from the city’s history and matching them up with modern day views from Google Street View.

Each example here is filled with fascinating details and obvious comparisons in life separated by centuries… even if the buildings remain the same.

More images and information at the link.

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Are Our Transit Maps Tricking Us?

Are Our Transit Maps Tricking Us? | visual data | Scoop.it
Subway maps distort the reality on the ground for all kinds of reasons. What happens when we make decisions based on them?

London’s city center takes up about two percent of the city. On the Tube map, it looks four times as big.

Over in New York City, Central Park—which is a skinny sliver, much longer than it is wide—was depicted in some 1960s and ‘70s IRT maps as a fat rectangle on its side.

So public transit maps are distorted, quite on purpose. All of them enlarge city centers. Many use a fixed distance between stations out in the boonies, even if, in reality, they’re spaced wildly differently. Curvy lines are made straight. Transfers are coded with dots, lines, and everything in between.

According to Zhan Guo, an assistant professor of urban planning and transportation policy at NYU Wagner, certain cities allow for more flight of fancy than others. San Francisco and New York have a lot of geographic markers, so passengers will only accept so much map distortion.

New York’s grid system further discourages excessive futzing. In Chicago, the line is elevated, which leaves even less leeway. But in a place like London, with twisty streets, few geographical markers other than the Thames, and an underground system, you can pull a lot more over on people...

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Editorial: Visualisation Tools for Understanding Big Data

Editorial: Visualisation Tools for Understanding Big Data | visual data | Scoop.it

I recently co-wrote an editorial (download the full version here) with Mike Batty (UCL CASA) in which we explored some of the current issues surrounding the visualisation of large urban datasets. We were inspired to write it following the CASA Smart Cities conference and we included a couple of visualisations I have blogged here. Much of the day was devoted to demonstrating the potential of data visualisation to help us better understand our cities. Such visualisations would not have been possible a few years ago using desktop computers their production has ballooned as a result of recent technological (and in the case of OpenData, political) advances...

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The ever changing story of London's skyline

The ever changing story of London's skyline | visual data | Scoop.it

More than 230 tall buildings of over 20 storeys are currently proposed, approved or under construction in London, according to an independent survey which also claims that 80% of the planned towers will be for residential use.

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London's future skyline captured in new visualiations

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations | visual data | Scoop.it

This series of images by architectural rendering studio Hayes Davidson envisages how London's skyline might look in 20 years time.

Over 200 towers with a height of 20 storeys or greater are planned in the UK capital over the next two decades and Hayes Davidson has visualised how these new buildings will appear alongside existing skyscrapers such as Renzo Piano's The Shard and Norman Foster's The Gherkin.


The images were created for an exhibition opening later this year at New London Architecture (NLA) entitled London's Growing... Up! which will chart the growth of tall building construction in London since the 1960s and look at the impact skyscrapers will have on the city in the near future.

"As London's population gets bigger and bigger, and new development for London takes place within the constraints of the green belt, we have to increase the density of the city," said Peter Murray, who is chairman of NLA and the exhibition curator.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 25, 9:30 AM

Future city planners and developers will be using some amazing tools.

Christina Guenther's curator insight, February 10, 9:24 PM

I have never been to London but their future is looking very attractive. 

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Beneath Every City Is A Labyrinth of Last Names

Beneath Every City Is A Labyrinth of Last Names | visual data | Scoop.it
Behind a city of data, an ocean of names.

This is what families look like in the age of big data. The cartographer James Cheshire has looked at over 900 different areas of London and graphed the most popular last names of each. He's then placed those over a map of the city, made it all zoomable and interactive, and highlighted which 15 last names -- and nationalities -- dominate each area...

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Mariana Soffer's comment, August 8, 2012 2:41 AM
great post Lauren Moss