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learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization

Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization | visual data | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how many meteors have hit Earth? The Meteoritical Society is doing its best to keep track. And Javier de la Torre, co-founder of CartoDB, is helping us see the pure volume of hits (into the tens of thousands). His interactive visualization shows a heatmap of hits all over the world, letting you explore where and when meteorites fell, as well as their size and classification.

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Laura Brown's curator insight, May 25, 2015 4:14 PM

I wonder how much of this is biased by the lack of reporting (or over reporting) in some areas. 

AnalyticsInnovations's curator insight, June 5, 2015 7:09 AM

Example of data scientist faux pas:  Meteors choose to fall so unevenly...!

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Daily Overview: Captivating Satellite Images of Earth

Daily Overview: Captivating Satellite Images of Earth | visual data | Scoop.it
If you like spending hours on Google Maps looking at the Earth from space, then you’re going to fall in love with a new website called The Daily Overview – an online initiative featuring breathtaking satellite images of our cities and the impact human activity has on our planet.
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Amazing Satellite Photos Of Earth Offer A New Perspective

Amazing Satellite Photos Of Earth Offer A New Perspective | visual data | Scoop.it

From up in the sky, the world that we know seems simplified, yet profound and the way architects and urban planners have shaped the earth comes sharply into view.

Astronauts have described this phenomenon as the "overview effect," citing the psychological impact of seeing the Earth from outer space. The Daily Overview, a new website launched last month, aims to share their sense of awe by posting one satellite photo of the Earth every day.

Founder Benjamin Grant and his team have chosen to focus on the built environment, "shining a light on the areas where our human activity—for better or worse—has shaped the landscape."

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jm gif's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:33 AM

I need to share this! New perspectives #point of view

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Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected

Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected | visual data | Scoop.it
NASA visualizes the 22,000 tons of life-giving dust that flows between Africa and South America.
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Picture of the Day: The First Image of Earth from Another Planet

Picture of the Day: The First Image of Earth from Another Planet | visual data | Scoop.it

This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd Martian day, or sol, of its mission. (March 8, 2004)

The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover’s navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover’s panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see. The inset shows a combination of four panoramic camera images zoomed in on Earth. The arrow points to Earth. Earth was too faint to be detected in images taken with the panoramic camera’s color filters.

The image is reminiscent of the famous pale blue dot capture by Voyager 1. If you have never heard Carl Sagan’s famous ‘Pale Blue Dot’ speech, check it out here.

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Why Historical Maps Still Matter So Much, Even Today

Why Historical Maps Still Matter So Much, Even Today | visual data | Scoop.it

With 150,000 or so old print maps to his name, David Rumsey has earned his reputed place among the world's "finest private collectors." He continues to expand his personal trove as well as the digitized sub-collection he makes open to the public online — some 38,000 strong, and growing.


He's created a series of interactive maps that layer old prints onto the Google Earth and Google Maps platforms, and this summer he plans to launch a geo-referencing tool (similar to one recently introduced by the British Library) that lets users get involved in the digital mapping process themselves.

While preparing for this next expansion of his online map empire, Rumsey remains fascinated by "the power of putting these images up and letting them go," he says.

"Maps have a way of speaking to people very straightforward," he says. "You don't have to have a lot of knowledge of map history or history in general. To me they're perfect tools for teaching history to the public."

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