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visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
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The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design | visual data | Scoop.it

The second installment of The Best American Infographics 2014 (public library) has an introduction by master-statistician Nate Silver and fifty-eight examples of stellar information design shedding light on such diverse topics as the history of space exploration, the sleep habits of famous writers, the geography of where gay people stay in the closet, the comparative shapes and sizes of major baseball parks, and the social network of jazz musicians in the 1920s. 

Silver, the author of The Signal and the Noise, considers the two factors that make an infographic compelling — providing a window into its creator’s mind and telling a story that “couldn’t be told in any other way.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, October 21, 6:14 PM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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Nicholas Felton Had 95,000 Conversations Last Year And Mapped Each One

Nicholas Felton Had 95,000 Conversations Last Year And Mapped Each One | visual data | Scoop.it
Life quantification pioneer Nicholas Felton's latest annual report is his most ambitious to date.

For the last nine years, Nicholas Felton--who you may know best for inspiring the Facebook timeline or creating the life-logging app Reporter--has been recording some aspect of almost every moment of his life. And each year, he turns this data into a elegant, printed book that visualizes the year called The Feltron Report...

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, September 26, 5:29 PM

The Felton report is a beautiful peeping hole into someone's life when they start to quantify themselves. Focussed on fairly benign problem space - conversations during the year - it shows what possibilities, both good and bad, lie within the quantified-self movement which is bound to explode with the availability of Apple watch and others alike.


Of course it brings tremendous opportunities for monitoring someone's life in order to improve it. Whether it is by measuring exercice (as we do today with step trackers) or heart rate or glucose levels in order to improve health or medical diagnosis. In the context of business, organizations can monitor employees in order to minimize injuries or prevent illness and time loss due to sickness.


There is of course the dark side, where all this data, when made available without our consent or knowledge, can be used to track us and restrict our privacy or our rights. This is already happening in the contexte of government surveillance (ie. Edward Snowden http://sco.lt/5k4B29) or internet browsing tracking (ie. data brokers http://sco.lt/79yNZh)

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19 Maps That Reorganize the Way We See the World

19 Maps That Reorganize the Way We See the World | visual data | Scoop.it

Most maps focus on demographics, geological makeup, and natural phenomena such as temperature and wind. No one focuses on other matters though, such as the alphabetic makeup of states when you sort their names in various ways. Break the names apart and put them back together. Examine the parts to gain a vision of the whole.

Find more maps, information and takeaways at the article.

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, August 14, 10:31 AM

De curieuses cartes !!

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Graphing New Yorkers' Lives Through the Open Data Portal

Graphing New Yorkers' Lives Through the Open Data Portal | visual data | Scoop.it
The I Quant NY blog mines NYC's massive data clearinghouse to visualize issues facing city dwellers, from education to eating.

Ben Wellington is the man behind I Quant NY, a blog dedicated to telling the stories hidden in New York City’s Open Data Portal, a clearinghouse of more than 1,300 data sets from city agencies. Started by the city government in 2011, the open data initiative’s goal is to facilitate government transparency and increase civic engagement.

The blog itself comes out of a stats course Wellington teaches at Pratt Institute’s graduate program for city and regional planning, where he uses these data sets in coursework. Covering everything from gender divides in Citi Bike usage to finding the farthest point away from a Starbucks in Manhattan, Wellington’s larger mission is to get people thinking critically about the numbers that, if analyzed right, can be the key to understanding New York City.

He spoke to CityLab about his blog, his hope for the open data movement, and some of his favorite data sets.

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Massive Visualizations at CeBIT Depict The Scale of “Big Data”

Massive Visualizations at CeBIT Depict The Scale of “Big Data” | visual data | Scoop.it

At this year’s CeBIT computer trade fair in Hannover, Germany, the world’s most impressive and eccentric new technology has been on display. But the massive data visualizations on display at the fair’s CODE_n exhibition in Hall 16 have turned heads with their artistry, execution and scale.

CODE_n bills itself as an international initiative for digital pioneers, innovators and groundbreaking startups. This year, it is focusing on big data. The elegantly complex visualizations that fill the exhibition hall’s more than 3,000 meters of wall space were designed to physically depict data on this immense scale.

More details at the link.

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What Does Big Data Look Like?

What Does Big Data Look Like? | visual data | Scoop.it

A simple Google image search on “big data” reveals numerous instances of three dimensional one’s and zero’s, a few explanatory infographics, and even the interface from The Matrix. So what does “big data” look like, within human comprehension?

From the beginning of recorded time until 2003, humans had created 5 exabytes (5 billion gigabytes) of data. In 2011, the same amount was created every two days. It’s true that we’ve made leaps and bounds with showing earlier generations of data. However, when it comes to today’s big data, how it looks can help convey information but it needs to be more than just beautiful and superficial. It has to work, show multiple dimensions, and be useful.

New software and technologies have enabled us to gain higher level access to understanding these enormous sets of data. However, the only way we’re going to truly gather and juice all the information big data is worth is to apply a level of relatively unprecedented data visualization. How do we get to actionable analysis, deeper insight, and visually comprehensive representations of the information? The answer: we need to make data more human.

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Ron Leunissen's curator insight, January 13, 7:27 AM

Drinking from a fire hose is not possible.

Neither is reading in a data stream of about 2,5 billion gigabytes per day!

Andreas Maniatis's curator insight, January 13, 12:05 PM

How do we get to actionable analysis, deeper insight, and visually comprehensive representations of the information? The answer: we need to make data more human.

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How Facebook's New Machine Brain Will Learn All About You From Your Photos

How Facebook's New Machine Brain Will Learn All About You From Your Photos | visual data | Scoop.it
Facebook poaches an NYU machine learning star to start a new AI lab that may very well end up knowing more about your social life than you do.

Facebook users upload 350 million photos onto the social network every day, far beyond the ability of human beings to comprehensively look at, much less analyze. And so that’s one big reason the company just hired NYU machine learning expert Yann LeCun as director of Facebook’s new AI laboratory, an eminent practitioner of an artificial intelligence (AI) technique known as “deep learning.”

“Yann LeCun's move will be an exciting step both for machine learning and for Facebook, which has a lot of unique social data,” says Andrew Ng, who directs the Stanford Artifical Intelligence Laboratory and who led a deep-learning project to analyze YouTube video for Google. “Machine learning is already used in hundreds of places throughout Facebook, ranging from photo tagging to ranking articles to your newsfeed. Better machine learning will be able to help improve all of these features, as well as help Facebook create new applications that none of us have dreamed of yet.”

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Lewis Walker's curator insight, December 21, 2013 9:38 AM

Mega data collection is not just the government, it is the wave of the future. The question is how will we use it?

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30 Tools for Data Visualization

30 Tools for Data Visualization | visual data | Scoop.it

During the past few years the demand regarding Data Info-graphics has increased in volume and demand as well as in clarity. The range of technologies available by which to collect and examine data is constantly on the rise- both in web and desktop applications, which provide several great interfaces.
From a technological aspect , such tools have created efficiency based models which have gone onto disrupting existing paradigms of the past. These vary and range from data synthesis to data visualization encompassing every type of data.

Within this scope, such new tools are continually emerging whose main purpose is to- simplify the process within being able to harness data in lending impact and insight generation...


Via ghbrett
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Datascaping And Designing With Information

Datascaping And Designing With Information | visual data | Scoop.it

DataAppeal software provides an alternative to complex mapping tools through an easy to use, web-based GIS application that renders typical data files into beautifully designed multi-dimensional maps and datascapes instantly. For architects, landscape architects, urban planners and designers of the built form, the application is a great tool to utilize evidence-based information to expose new site patterns, to provide alternative 3D modes of mapping for communication purposes, and to aid in the initiation of master plan designs.

It’s also a refreshing way to visually engage professional and students with their site-based data...

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burlysand's comment, September 24, 2013 3:28 AM
Pretty simple..
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Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place

Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place | visual data | Scoop.it

Take a look at a set of maps that tell encoded stories of politics, natural disasters and social movements.


There are many nice Flickr visualizations of global cities but never anything quite this comprehensive across space and time: Meet Luminous Cities, a creation of the London-based mapping and digital arts firm TraceMedia, built with support from the Centre for Spatial Analysis & Policy at the University of Leeds and the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

The project is trying to "uncover the archeology of data traces left by social media" in cities across the globe...

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Bytes Sized: Information Storage, Visualized [infographic]

Bytes Sized: Information Storage, Visualized [infographic] | visual data | Scoop.it

We are living in the information age. The amount of information stored, transfered, and processed is growing at a staggering rate.


From the common megabyte to the mind-boggling yottabyte, this infographic serves as a guide to understanding the world of bytes!

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The Cost Of Too Much Data | Infographic

The Cost Of Too Much Data | Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

The proliferation of data is impacting businesses whether they are ready or not...

Do you know what this data deluge is costing organzations across the US?

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An Artist Who Turns Data Into 3-D Displays

An Artist Who Turns Data Into 3-D Displays | visual data | Scoop.it

We’re deep in the midst of a data viz heyday. Infographics are ubiquitous, presenting facts and data sets in straightforward ways that are, by design, easy to understand.

 

Willem Besselink takes a different approach by translating directed sets of information into physical forms. What’s not explicit, however, are the complex stats that inspire each work.

Each new installation is dictated by its own unique guidelines and rules, which themselves are based on a number of dependent variables, including site-specifics, materials, color scheme, and budget. “Setting these up and following them all through the project allows--or forces--me to do what needs to be done,” he says, in part following the lead of “hero” Sol Lewitt’s Sentences on Conceptual Art.

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Stacey Petzold's curator insight, May 17, 2013 8:21 AM

For anyone who runs a business, maintains a calendar or does any statistical business related tasks - here is an artistic take on graphs.  Look at your charts - and think about taking them a step further...Enjoy!

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A 100-year Old Debate: Science or Art in Data Visualization?

A 100-year Old Debate: Science or Art in Data Visualization? | visual data | Scoop.it

When did people first start writing about effective ways of visualizing data?

Your answer might go back to the 1980s (Edward Tufte, perhaps) or even further back into the 1960s (Jacques Bertin, maybe). Few people would go back so far as 100 years ago. That’s right: one hundred years ago...

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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | visual data | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...

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Bhopkins's curator insight, August 22, 10:53 AM

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

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The YouTube Of Data Visualization Is Here

The YouTube Of Data Visualization Is Here | visual data | Scoop.it
A new site called Dadaviz aims to make quality visualizations just as social and discoverable on the web as video or music.

Where do you go on the web if you want to see great data visualizations? With a few exceptions, like Reddit's Data Is Beautiful subforum, there is no one-stop destination for quality data viz on the web.

But Dadaviz aims to change all of that. Aiming to be a portal for the best visualization content on the web, it also want to teach big advertisers to harness the power of data to sell their brands...

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Science Reveals Artists Really Do Have Different Brains

Science Reveals Artists Really Do Have Different Brains | visual data | Scoop.it

We might now have neurological proof that artists actually are different creatures from everyone else on the planet. According to a study published in Neurolmage, researchers believe that artists have brains that are structurally different from non-artists.

The study, titled "Drawing On The Right Side Of The Brain: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis Of Observational Drawing," included 44 graduate and post-grad art students and non-art students who were asked to complete various drawing tasks. The completed tasks were measured and scored, and that data was compared to "regional grey and white matter volume in the cortical and subcortical structures" of the brain using a scanning method called voxel-based morphometry. An increase in grey matter density on the left anterior cerebellum and the right medial frontal gyrus were observed in relation to drawing skills.

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Stunning Maps of World Topography

Stunning Maps of World Topography | visual data | Scoop.it

Robin Edwards, a researcher at UCL CASA, has created these stunning topographic maps using the high resolution elevation data provided by the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The transitions from black (high areas) to blue (low areas) give the maps a slightly ethereal appearance to dramatic effect.

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Using Big Data to Ask Big Questions

Using Big Data to Ask Big Questions | visual data | Scoop.it

Big Questions are speculative, exploratory, and systemic. As the name implies, they are also answered at scale: Rather than distilling a small slice of a dataset into a concrete answer, Big Questions look at entire datasets and reveal small questions you wouldn’t have thought to ask...


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Ignasi Alcalde's comment, December 25, 2013 5:23 AM
awesome
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New MIT Media Lab Tool Lets Anyone Visualize Unwieldy Government Data

New MIT Media Lab Tool Lets Anyone Visualize Unwieldy Government Data | visual data | Scoop.it

DataViva, a project developed in part by Media Lab professor Csar Hidalgo, aims to make a wide swath of government economic data usable with a series of visualization apps.

In the four years since the U.S. government created data.gov, the first national repository for open data, more than 400,000 datasets are available online from 175 agencies. Governments all over the world have taken steps to make data more transparent and available. But in practice, much of that data--accessible as spreadsheets through sites like data.gov--is incomprehensible to the average person.

DataViva offers web apps that turn those spreadsheets into something more comprehensible for the average user. The site, which officially launched last week, has lofty goals: to visualize data encompassing the entire Brazilian economy over the last decade, with more than 100 million interactive visualizations that can be created at the touch of a button in a series of apps. The future of open government isn't just dumping raw datasets onto a server: It's also about making those datasets digestible for a less data-savvy public.

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Subtleties of Color: Connecting Color to Meaning

Subtleties of Color: Connecting Color to Meaning | visual data | Scoop.it

'About a year ago, we published a blog post framed as a letter to NASA, asking them to stop using rainbow color scales. The post was written out of a general frustration with rainbow color scales, but especially out of seeing field experts and leaders, like NASA, using a perceptually incorrect color scale. We weren’t alone.


Robert Simmon from NASA’s Earth Observatory has been crusading for the same changes. He’s made great progress, and as a continuation of that, he’s responding to our “letter” with a brilliant series of blog posts on proper use of colors and color scales.'

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The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED

The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED | visual data | Scoop.it
This giant installation and a website you can play with at home lets you compare the worlds urban centers side by side.

We live in a world of easily accessible maps; however, our map knowledge is limited by the fact that no two cities collect data the same way. Maps often aren’t drawn to the same scale, and until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare data on things like income, cost of living, water distribution, and power grids.

It’s a problem that has bugged Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference (as well as an architect and graphic designer), for decades.

Wurman recently teamed up with Jon Kamen of Radical Media and Esri president Jack Dangermond to create an ambitious solution: the Urban Observatory, an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on.


Find more details and information at the article link...

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NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | visual data | Scoop.it

Even for the most direction-savvy New Yorker, emerging from the dark pit of the subway can be a disorienting experience. New York City streets are bright, they’re loud, oftentimes they’re smelly, and worst of all, maps are virtually non-existent. Or at least that used to be the case.


Just this week, the Department of Transportation unveiled its WalkNYC initiative, a program that will bring comprehensive pedestrian maps to all five boroughs. In a city where an estimated 30 percent of all trips are made by foot and one out of every three locals can’t tell north from south, they’re probably going to come in handy.


Though NYC’s public transportation is top-notch and we are technically on a grid, it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed when traveling by foot. That’s why the DOT enlisted the help of PentaCityGroup, a consortium of urban planners, engineers, designers, cartographers and geographical information specialists, to solve the problem.

Their goal? To create an information-packed map that would orient pedestrians and help them find the gems each NYC neighborhood has to offer. The first of these new information kiosks was installed earlier this week in Chinatown (they’re already located at every Citi Bike station), and it’s expected that others will be popping up in midtown Manhattan, Long Island City in Queens and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn this summer

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luiy's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:49 AM

If the style of these maps looks familiar, that’s because it is. The design team wanted to marry the current design to the graphic language that was was established for the subway system in the late 1960s. The typeface is still Helvetica (albeit with a slight twist–the type’s square dots are now round) and it uses the same organizational conventions (white type on a dark background). “All of this was deliberately echoing the way the subways look,” Bierut explains. “We wanted people to be able to ride the subway, come out and orient themselves.” Bierut says the design of the maps is meant to be accurate, trustworthy and friendly. But not too friendly—this is New York City, after all. “We wanted these things to be beautiful in a way, but also characteristic of the best of New York.”

ParadigmGallery's comment, July 8, 2013 4:02 PM
great...can't wait to try these...
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The Future of Infographics: Better Ways to Present Content

The Future of Infographics: Better Ways to Present Content | visual data | Scoop.it

In terms of visual data and design, instead of making the content or story fit into an infographic, we need to consider what is the best way to present the data or story.


What medium does the content best lend itself to?


To make this shift in finding better ways to present content, we need to change our mindset and our language. When we talk about infographics, we should categorically refer to them as creative pieces to help being confined to a predetermined content format. These formats can include videos, quizzes and other interactive elements that will make the infographic stand apart from the masses.

Visit the link for some strategies and examples of infographics that are on the right path and take an approach that is different than most of the infographics on the web.

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See A Beautiful, Data-Enriched Map of New York City

See A Beautiful, Data-Enriched Map of New York City | visual data | Scoop.it

Londoner Marcus Kirby was bored with traditional maps and pastel-colored countries, so he started a company to revive the age-old business of cartography. 

The Future Mapping Company uses traditional map-making techniques (lithographic instead of digital) to create colorful, intricate city representations. Most recently, the company has created a map of New York City, to be released later this month.

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