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visual data
learning, conceptualizing + communicating data with infographics, visualizations, etc...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System

Mapping the Surface Area of Other Solid Surfaces in Our Solar System | visual data | Scoop.it

You’re probably familiar with visualizations comparing the relative size of the planets, but this visualization is different.


xkcd has created a map-like look at the solid surfaces of the Solar System, stitched together like countries on a single continent. The graphic includes planets, moons, asteroids and dwarf planets, but leaves out dust, small rocks and large gaseous planets like Jupiter and Saturn. It’s a revealing look at the size of our neighbors...

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The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED

The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED | visual data | Scoop.it
This giant installation and a website you can play with at home lets you compare the worlds urban centers side by side.

We live in a world of easily accessible maps; however, our map knowledge is limited by the fact that no two cities collect data the same way. Maps often aren’t drawn to the same scale, and until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare data on things like income, cost of living, water distribution, and power grids.

It’s a problem that has bugged Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference (as well as an architect and graphic designer), for decades.

Wurman recently teamed up with Jon Kamen of Radical Media and Esri president Jack Dangermond to create an ambitious solution: the Urban Observatory, an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on.


Find more details and information at the article link...

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Network of data visualization references

Network of data visualization references | visual data | Scoop.it
Developer Santiago Ortiz explores visualization references through Delicious tags and puts them in a discovery context. There are two views. The first is a network with tags and resources as nodes. At first it looks like a giant hairball, but mouseover and you get a fisheye effect to zoom in on nodes, which makes them more readable. Mouse over a tag, and the labels for related resources get bigger, and likewise, mouse over a resource, and the related tags get bigger.

The second view lets you compare resources. In the network, select two ore more resources, and then click on the bottom button to compare the selected.

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The Narrative Eros of the Infographic

The Narrative Eros of the Infographic | visual data | Scoop.it

In 1976, neuroscientist Douglas Nelson definitively described the cognitive potency of the image as the pictorial superiority effect. He and others have shown that our brains are essentially hard-wired for visuals—the very architecture of our visual cortex allows graphics a unique mainline into our consciousness. According to Allan Pavio’s somewhat controversial dual-coding theory, imagery stimulates both verbal and visual representations, whereas language is primarily processed through only the verbal channel. While there has been considerable pushback to Pavio’s theory since its introduction in the 1970s, numerous experiments have shown that imagery activates multiple, powerful neural pathways of memory recall...

It is no surprise, then, that our media are now saturated with such infographics, both on-and off-line, as a host of publications such as The New York Times, Good, The Guardian, Wired, Time, The Economist, The Believer, and The Wall Street Journal all regularly depend on data visualizations to provide their readers with that on-the-spot, quasi-highbrow sociological analysis. As one might expect, the output is decidedly mixed. Faced with a glut of mediocre charts and diagrams, there is now a backlash among designers and journalists against the overuse of meaningless infographics...

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Global data geovisualized

Global data geovisualized | visual data | Scoop.it
Learn about the world by changing the familiar map. Select a subject from the top menu and watch the map resize. A countrys total area no longer represents land mass, but items relevant to the subject (i.e.

 

Since I ran out of spot on my Top 10 list quick, this is getting 'honorable mention.'  The geovisualization in this interactive map is outstanding (translation: I could play with this all day).  This displayed map shows the destination countries for migrants, with links to the data and information to read up on the topic.  Truly impressive.   


Via Seth Dixon
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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | visual data | Scoop.it

The Smithsonian magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating.

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Gordon Shupe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:24 AM

I love interactive maps, and history is fascinating... let's take a look!

Sue Bedard's curator insight, September 5, 2013 8:09 AM

Great for comparrison and reasoning

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Infographic: the Future of Big Data

Infographic: the Future of Big Data | visual data | Scoop.it

Big data is not new. It has existed for ages and can be attributed even to the initial years of computing. However, one might do well to consider why is there an increased buzz around this now.

The answer is quite simple: Significant advances that have been brought about by x86 hardware have actually helped in bringing computing power to the masses. However, with new technologies, cloud computing has extended this power. Now, users have extended perimeters, while still being able to control costs effectively...

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12 Visualizations That Will Change the Way You View Scale

12 Visualizations That Will Change the Way You View Scale | visual data | Scoop.it

Scale is a simple concept. From a very early age, children know about big and small, heavy and light, more and less. Extreme scales, however, are another story.

Try to imagine, for example, the size of the universe… or $1 trillion made up entirely of dollar bills. Exactly. Grasping the actual quantities involved in extreme scales can be difficult, which makes managing scale in visualizations an interesting problem.

Here are 12 visualizations that try to show things at extreme scales.


Via Andrea Zeitz
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Seven Tools for Creating Data Visualizations

Seven Tools for Creating Data Visualizations | visual data | Scoop.it

Digital tools have faciliated an easier way to visually represent complex data and information in ways at are logical and intuitive.  This blog post outlines tools that students can use (read: free!) along with basic tutorials to demonstrate their functionalities. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Fabryka Prezentacji's comment, February 5, 2012 8:05 AM
Great one, thanks. Re-shared.
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Updated Comparison of Data Visualization tools

Updated Comparison of Data Visualization tools | visual data | Scoop.it

One of the most popular posts on this blog was a comparison of Data Visualization Tools, which originally was posted more then a year ago where I compared those best tools only qualitatively. However since then I got a lot of requests to compare those tools “quantitatively”.

However I quickly realized that such “quantitative” comparison cannot be objective. So here it is – the updated and very subjective comparison of best Data Visualization tools, as I see them at the end of 2011.

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