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Visual Culture and Communication
Questions and observations concerning visual culture,
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Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry'

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry' | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Photographs culled from an unbound and unpublished album of Henri Cartier-Bresson taken in Pondicherry are at the core of an upcoming exhibition...

 

" In Henri Cartier-Bresson’s life that remained eventful till the end, one chapter belonged to the photographer’s visit to Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry in the ’50s. The father of modern photojournalism had of course been to India earlier, met Mahatma Gandhi and even covered his funeral. All of that remains well-known but his work on the Ashram remains comparatively less talked about. Bresson, it is said, had a knack for bearing witness to historic moments. So this time too, he was there shooting Sri Aurobindo, the revered yogi-philosopher-guru-poet, just a few months before his death.

 


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Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies'

Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies' | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

'Young wavering photojournalists, such as myself, often go in search of pictures with a sometimes wanton thirst. They move cities, living their days out of cheap bus-stand lodges or friends’ apartments, and nights drinking outside cheap bars on Church Street. Anything that provokes a narrative. They probably think that like Nan Goldin, they’ll make pictures representing the transgressions of young urban dwellers. Faltering, perhaps they’ll meet a young queer poet and dance writer and find a subject. Over the next six months — furtive conversations over cheap whiskey at watering holes, words punctuated by drags of cigarettes and post-ganja confessions in bedrooms — they will take pictures of their friends, teasing out nuggets of a story. Rolls of film fed by curiosity. As Goldin put it, “It’s the form of photography that is most defined by love. People… take them to remember people”. This love is born out of a long-standing relationship between the observer and the subject.

 

On the face of it, Kushal Ray’s Intimacies is a series that could be seen as a representation of domestic decline, even a “human catastrophe”. Critiques of Ray’s photographs as an episodic representation of the decline in Kolkata’s middle class, the 12-room, family home of the Chatterjees, seem to encapsulate the slow withering of a joint family. They see Ray’s interiors as a metaphor for the politics that aims to unmask the accident of poverty. Perhaps, even a representation of his working class family’s poverty and violence; stages of personal degradation and suffering...'

 

Text by Akshay Mahajan | Tehelka
 


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Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | Chandigarh: Portrait of a City by Manuel Bougot

Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | Chandigarh: Portrait of a City by Manuel Bougot | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

"Manuel Bougot’s interest in Le Corbusier’s architecture began in the 1980s when he worked on Caroline Maniaque’s thesis in architecture – on the Jaoul Houses, built in 1954, in Neuilly, France. From 2006 onwards, Bogout renewed his interest in Le Corbusier, attending talks on Chandigarh and photographed the only building the architect ever built for himself – a cabanon (a summer cabin) in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin. The desire to photograph Chandigarh thus became imperative to further any understanding of Le Corbusier, the urban designer, and his philosophy about architecture and modernism."

 

Photograph by Manuel Bougot.

Article from Platform Mag.


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ShaluSharma's comment, September 18, 2012 5:59 AM
Interesting one.
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Photo Essay | 2002: The Year they Were Born, By Garima Jain

Photo Essay | 2002: The Year they Were Born, By Garima Jain | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

Ayesha Rashid Bhai Mansuri & Nausim Rashid Bhai Mansuri,

10 Juhapura, Ahmedabad

Father irons clothes


"We have lived here for eight years, on this side of the road we call ‘Border’. We cross to the Hindu side only to buy vegetables. Recently, Hindus and Muslims threw stones at each other across the Border during a wedding. I know what a Hindu looks like because they wear a bindi and tika. The only time we meet them is when we go with father to the factory where he works. It’s in the Hindu area."

 

Photographs and text by Garima Jain


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