Visual Culture an...
Follow
Find
7.6K views | +3 today
 
Rescooped by Nicholas Ripley from conceptual photography
onto Visual Culture and Communication
Scoop.it!

Who's that girl? Natalie Joos - Telegraph.co.uk

Who's that girl? Natalie Joos - Telegraph.co.uk | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.ukWho's that girl? Natalie JoosTelegraph.co.ukBelgian-born, New York-based Natalie Joos charmed her way from New York to Paris in myriad looks that sent street snappers into paroxysms of photographic joy, and struck fear into the...

Via RonenGoldman
more...
No comment yet.
Visual Culture and Communication
Questions and observations concerning visual culture,
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Deconstructing Trees

Deconstructing Trees | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

Deconstructing Trees. Monochrome photographs exploring the patterns of constructal law in trees.

more...
Marcelo Errera's curator insight, August 17, 11:12 AM

Trees emerged everywhere. They continue to amaze us by its design. 

Rescooped by Nicholas Ripley from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Can the Zone System Go Digital? | Alan Ross

Can the Zone System Go Digital? | Alan Ross | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

The Zone System (ZS) can be an integral and important part of any digital photographer’s workflow because it allows you to plan and predict an image’s tonal values rather than letting the camera make the decision. The computerized metering systems in modern cameras are really amazing, and a lot of the time they will give you practical exposures, but in difficult or extreme lighting situations, the scale of the subject’s brightness is simply greater than the camera’s technology can handle.

The Zone System:

Lets you be aware of whether, or how much, the scene brightness exceeds your camera’s limitsLets you make an intelligent decision about how to expose when the tones/contrast in a scene are “bigger” than what your camera can captureHelps you avoid blown-out highlightsLets you know how much exposure range you need for successful HDR captures


The Zone System 101

To use the Zone System effectively in the digital world, you need to understand a few of its basic principles: The ZS was originally conceived by Ansel Adams and fellow photo instructor Fred Archer as a tool to give photographers working with black-and-white negative film (no digital back then!) the ability to plan and control the effects of exposure and development. They created a “scale” of tones from black to white and assigned each one a number, with “I” being almost pure black and “IX” or “X” being nearly white or white.  Zone “V” is middle gray, and each “Zone” is one stop lighter or darker than its neighbor. In the digital age, image contrast can be easily increased post-capture, but there is no practical means of reducing image contrast in a single capture. Pre-exposure can enhance shadow tonality, but this requires the ability to double-expose, and High Dynamic Range techniques (HDR) require three or more exposures for best results. Sophisticated “evaluative” metering modes in modern cameras can handle many complicated shooting situations, but if the contrast of the scene exceeds the recording scale of the camera, something’s gotta give. This is where the ZS can help........

 

 


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Google and Stanford unveil new machine vision technology that recognizes complex scenes

Google and Stanford unveil new machine vision technology that recognizes complex scenes | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Researchers have unveiled a step forward in artificial intelligence that allows computers to describe the content of photos and videos with a greater accuracy than ever before – occasionally even aping human comprehension.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

It is hoped that hundreds more photos could yet emerge

It is hoped that hundreds more photos could yet emerge | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
An incredible collection of photos revealing previously unseen moments from World War One has been released.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Hundreds Of Previously Unpublished Photos From Picasso’s Personal Life Released

Hundreds Of Previously Unpublished Photos From Picasso’s Personal Life Released | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
The artist's grandson has unveiled a trove of images and home movies that give an intimate look at Picasso's life and loves.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Processing the News: Retouching in Photojournalism

Processing the News: Retouching in Photojournalism | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Every digital image must be touched by software before you see it. But when each pixel is affected, who decides what is true?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

All public art is a political statement – the best marks a rich, changing society

All public art is a political statement – the best marks a rich, changing society | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Helen Lewis: From white male heroes to bronze single mothers, our choices reflect shifts in prevailing attitudes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Photographer criticised by indigenous people and Survival International

Photographer criticised by indigenous people and Survival International | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Jimmy Nelson’s glamorous portraits of African, Asian and Amazon groups dismissed as ‘wrong’ and ‘just a photographer’s fantasy’
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicholas Ripley from Photography Now
Scoop.it!

The icons of photojournalism: visual narration that cannot be admitted

The icons of photojournalism: visual narration that cannot be admitted | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
«Sacred images for a secular society1», icons of photojournalism, according to the communication researchers Robert Hariman and John Louis Lucaites, are emblems that impose themselves on the spirit of the time of their own accord.

Via Mario Pires
more...
Mario Pires's curator insight, October 22, 12:47 PM

"Journalistic mythology describes as a neutral and objective presentation what is fundamentally an exercise in qualifying information. Like the choice of a title or introductory paragraph, iconography plays a crucial part in this job of steering interpretation. But visual forms entail a greater margin of ambiguity than linguistic utterances."

Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

The Pantograph Punch — Slippery Questions: The Role of Ethics in Art

The Pantograph Punch — Slippery Questions: The Role of Ethics in Art | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Melissa Laing asks what it means to create ethical art - and what role ethics have for an audience member.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Technicolor was born 100 years ago (more or less) - and movies have not been the same since

Technicolor was born 100 years ago (more or less) - and movies have not been the same since | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
At this month’s 25th Dinard festival of British film in Brittany, there was  a special screening of the 1946 Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger masterpiece A Matter of Life and Death to mark “100 years of the Technicolor process”.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

The Previously Unseen Work of 70s Chicago Nightlife Photographer Michael Abramson

The Previously Unseen Work of 70s Chicago Nightlife Photographer Michael Abramson | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
The late Michael L. Abramson forever sealed into emulsion the energy and emotion of Chicago nightlife. From blues clubs to strip clubs, his photography rev
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

He Spent Years Taking Photos Of One Small Town. When You Look Closer, You'll See Why.

He Spent Years Taking Photos Of One Small Town. When You Look Closer, You'll See Why. | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
It all makes sense now.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Realism or Iconography? The Pentagon’s Implicit Theory of Visual Representation

Realism or Iconography? The Pentagon’s Implicit Theory of Visual Representation | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
The following is an extract from my chapter, “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’,” published in Good In...
more...
Mario Pires's curator insight, December 24, 9:53 AM

"What is also remarkable about the “Flickr strategy” above is the implicit understanding that images contain a single, direct message, and that what is photographed, and how it is photographed, will determine whether an image is “successful” in supporting the US Army “mission”. In other words, photographs can only be understood in one manner: the intended manner."

Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Photography is art and always will be

Photography is art and always will be | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Do Jane Bown, William Eggleston and Diane Arbus not sing on a gallery wall? Photography critic Sean O’Hagan hits back at Jonathan Jones’s damning claim that photographs cannot be considered fine art
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

In Street Photography, The Smaller the Camera, the Better - Eric Kim Street Photography Blog

In Street Photography, The Smaller the Camera, the Better - Eric Kim Street Photography Blog | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Recently for my trip to Stockholm, London, and Dubai I brought along my Hasselblad 501c and 80mm lens (and about 20 rolls of Kodak Portra 400 120 film). I had been shooting a lot of medium-format 6×6 photos back home, and I had the natural gut feeling to bring it to my trip and make …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

WILLIAM EGGLESTON: “Introduction to Ancient and Modern” (1992) | AMERICAN SUBURB X

WILLIAM EGGLESTON: “Introduction to Ancient and Modern” (1992) | AMERICAN SUBURB X | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Shotguns and sundaes: Gordon Parks's rare photographs of everyday life in the segregated South

Shotguns and sundaes: Gordon Parks's rare photographs of everyday life in the segregated South | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Lost for more than 50 years since they were featured in Life magazine, Gordon Parks’s stunning images show daily life for one Alabama family in the shadow of race riots, bus boycotts and the fight for civil rights
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicholas Ripley from Social Art Practices
Scoop.it!

The Cultural Value Initiative

This is a blog devoted to the topic of cultural value, and in particular to an exploration of cultural value that does not rely on an understanding of ‘value’ in economic terms. The starting point for this initiative is that we need to reclaim the value debate from the ‘econocrats’ who operate on the basis of ‘the belief that there exist fundamental economic tests or yardsticks according to which policy decisions can and should be made’ (Self 1975, 5). Economics has much to contribute to the cultural value debate, but it represents only one possible way to think about what we value – as a society – and how we look after what is valuable to us (besides, there is much more to an economics-based undeerstanding of value than cost-benefit analyses). As a researcher working interdisciplinarily but initially trained in the Humanities, I am interested in looking at what other disciplinary perspectives can offer the understanding of what cultural value is and how it is inscribed in public policies for the cultural sector. In short, there is more to cultural value than what can be expressed in terms of a cost benefit analysis, and here is a place to explore what that ‘more’ might look like. Indeed, I very much hope that you might like to contribute your own take on that. WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM THIS BLOG? My interest in cultural value dates back to years ago, when I began researching the idea that the arts can have beneficial social impacts, and that these impacts might constitute a convincing rationale for policy and a solid justification for arts subsidy. In the context of a move towards evidence-based policy making in all areas of the public sector, I was intrigued by the persisting faith in the power of the arts to deliver such impacts even in the face of an inadequate evidence base and poor impact evaluation standards. However, I eventually came to be quite critical of the blind faith in evidence as the actual driver of policy (not just in cultural policy making, but more broadly) coming to the conclusion that, rather, policies seem to be driven by what policy actors think and what they believe in – or in other words – their values.


Via Jules Rochielle
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

David Bailey: this is what 100 looks like

David Bailey: this is what 100 looks like | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Fauja Singh gave up marathon running last year – at 102. Eileen Symonds, 100, only stopped driving two years ago. And Michael Klanga had wine with every meal until he was 106. David Bailey photographs nine British centenarians. Interviews by Sally Williams
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicholas Ripley from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

On Failure and Street Photography | Eric Kim

On Failure and Street Photography | Eric Kim | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it

Street photography is all about failure. The failure to have the courage to take that one shot. The failure to capture “the decisive moment.” The failure to get a clean background. The failure to have your subject make eye contact. The failure to move your feet to get a better frame. The failure to get recognition for your work. The failure to have your photo get “explored” on Flickr. Failures upon failures upon failures. I think one of the things that initially drew me to street photography is just how damn hard it is. It was unlike any other form of photography out there. It was so unpredictable. Whereas when I shot landscape, macro, or architecture– I could take however long I wanted, and I had so much in my control. But with street photography, I had to learn to relinquish control to simply “go with the flow.” I couldn’t control the light, control how people looked, the background– all I could control is how well I could move my feet, and click the shutter at what I thought would be the “right” moment.....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

How the brain leads us to believe we have sharp vision

How the brain leads us to believe we have sharp vision | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
We assume that we can see the world around us in sharp detail. In fact, our eyes can only process a fraction of our surroundings precisely. In a series of experiments, psychologists have been investigating how the brain fools us into believing that we see in sharp detail.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

LaToya Ruby Frazier's Notion of Family

LaToya Ruby Frazier's Notion of Family | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
LaToya Ruby Frazier looked at her family’s history to build an enduring narrative of African-American life in the Rust Belt town where she was raised.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Creating Photographic Art - Exclusive Interview With Gregory Crewdson | Fstoppers

Creating Photographic Art - Exclusive Interview With Gregory Crewdson | Fstoppers | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
How do you make a photograph that sells for more than $100,000? Gregory Crewdson may not have the answer, and I suspect he probably doesn’t care, but that is what his prints will routinely fetch, if not more. What is it that allows him to create such staggeringly powerful works of art, and what are the struggles he endures through the creative process?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Pentagon Photography and Visual Anthropology

Pentagon Photography and Visual Anthropology | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Could it be any more obvious how the Pentagon has learned to mimic certain styles of anthropological photography as shown in the instance above? Resembling any of a vast number of photographs of or...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Ripley
Scoop.it!

Fred Herzog - Inspiration from Masters of Photography - 121Clicks.com

Fred Herzog - Inspiration from Masters of Photography - 121Clicks.com | Visual Culture and Communication | Scoop.it
Fred Herzog was born in September 21, 1930 Stuttgart, Germany and then later moved to Vancouver, Canada. Initially he started as a medical photographer in the department of Bio-medical Communication and was taught at the Simon Fraser University.
more...
No comment yet.