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A sparkling emblem of the Italian style | Italian Food Excellence

A sparkling emblem of the Italian style | Italian Food Excellence | Visiting Italy | Scoop.it
S. Pellegrino water flows from sources at the foot of Alps and it is recognized as one of the best waters on the market at the international level. It is exported to 130 Countries by means of branches and distributors spread ...
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Things to Do in Milan, Italy

Things to Do in Milan, Italy | Visiting Italy | Scoop.it

Milan is well-known as the design capital of Italy. Tourists are always enticed by its rich culture, history, and visual treats from both the past and the present.


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Gucci and Versace warn of the identity crisis of 'Made in Italy'

Gucci and Versace warn of the identity crisis of 'Made in Italy' | Visiting Italy | Scoop.it
At the debut of Milan Fashion Week, luxury Italian houses of Gucci and Versace are signalling the crisis of identity which Made in Italy is facing, deploring the ignorance of Italian authorities for the fashion industry.

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Where do kiwis come from? | Italy Food Roots

Where do kiwis come from? | Italy Food Roots | Visiting Italy | Scoop.it

When I arrived, I was met with the usual lively scene: Kiwis were raining down from the vines into hanging plastic buckets thanks to the furious efforts of a troop of 7 or 8 rowdy pickers. As soon as the buckets were full, another mini-team stealthy emptied them into into huge plastic crates, which in turn were whisked away by a tractor whizzing up and down the rows of kiwi vines.

 

Although it looks simple to the untrained eye, kiwi picking does require a decent amount of experience. Wholesalers only accept kiwis that are approx. 65 g. and above, so anything smaller than that minimum weight should be left. More expert pickers carry out this selection directly on the vines “ad occhio” – just by looking at them. For rookies like me, Carlo’s wife’s kitchen scales were to hand so I could get my eye in. “What are the smaller ones used for” I asked. “Nothing, we just leave them or throw them away” was the typically nonchalant response. Simply put, what the market deems substandard, the farmer can’t sell, so any kiwis which don’t make the cut are simply left to drop and rot in the field. And it doesn’t end here, since even aesthetic considerations come into play as all those kiwis which aren’t standard shapes, such as the fan-shaped ‘ventaglio’ kiwis, or flattend “piattelli”, are separated out from the standard oval shape kiwis. Even though they’re perfectly good to eat (and often larger), the fact that they don’t confirm to the market’s aesthetic norm means they’re classified as a second-class kiwi and the farmer gets less for them too.

 

Size, surprisingly, is the least of Carlo’s worries. Two freak hail storms in July caused about 70% of Carlo’s kiwi crop to the be bruised by hail. Carlo’s has a melancholy, slightly defeated air about him as he describes how the hail storm was a ‘double disaster’ for him. Firstly because many of the large kiwis falling off his vines are likely to be rejected by the wholesaler as they’re not pristine. Secondly because he won’t get paid in full for those which haven’t been damaged by hail and are in perfect condition simply because they come from a batch that has been hailed on. Talk about being caught between a rock and hard place! Despite it being a bummer crop this year, I was amazed to think of all the hurdle a kiwi has to get through to make it onto our fruit & veg shop or supermarket shelf. On the contrary, Italy produces over 400 tonnes of kiwi’s each year, making it the largest kiwi producer worldwide. Upon reflection, therefore, I think I prefer one of Carlo’s whopping hail damaged kiwis to a perfectly shaped one because at least I know it’s real!

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A really insightful piece explaining everything there is too know about kiwis and where they come from in Italy! 

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7 Italian food and wine events you really shouldn't miss this Spring

7 Italian food and wine events you really shouldn't miss this Spring | Visiting Italy | Scoop.it

7 Italian food and wine events you really shouldn’t miss this Spring
Love food? Love Italy? Then get yourself along to Italy this Spring! There’s a whole host of gourmet events taking place and here we’ve rounded up 7 of the best foodie festivals to whet your appetite in the few months ahead, covering everything from fresh fish (see ‘Slow Fish’ below) to fried food (see ‘Fritto Misto’).

Primavera del Prosecco 16th March – 9th June 2013
Treviso, Valdobbiadene, Conegliano, Cartizze
This exciting annual event takes place in the heart of the Prosecco wine area and will lead the visitors in a journey of discovery of all aspects of this delicious wine production process.

Slow Fish, in Liguria From 10th to 13th May 2013, Genoa
The international show completely dedicated to the fish world and its problems comes back to the Fiera di Genova. It takes place every two years and it is organized by Slow Food and the Regione Liguria; www.slowfish.it

Sagra del Pesce, in Liguria 12th May 2013, Camogli (Genoa)
In the natural, picturesque, and exclusive setting of the small square of the port, the largest frying pan in the world will fry fish for guests and tourists alike, during the most typical Ligurian feast: the Sagra del Pesce. Born in 1952, this classical festival is linked to the centuries-old festival of San Fortunato, patron of the fishermen. The religious celebration takes place on the evening of its eve with bonfires: the people of Camogli, from the two districts of Porto and Pinetto, build proper, large scale sculptures, using waste material; they challenge one another in terms of creativity and beauty, on the two sides of the beach. Tel. +39 0185 771066 – www.prolococamogli.it

Sagra del Limone, in Liguria 18th May 2013, Monterosso (La Spezia)
During this day the town is painted yellow and the streets come alive with stalls of all types where the typical fruit of the area and its produce reign supreme: limoncino, lemon cream, marmalade and lemon cake. In the afternoon the ‘8000 passi al profumo di limone’ walk winds around the streets of Monterosso, starting at the house of poet Eugenio Montale and passing by the most famous places in the area.

Aromatica, in Liguria June, Imperia province
(Diano Marina, San Bartolomeo al Mare, Cervo, Diano Arentino, Diano Castello, Diano San Pietro, Villa Faraldi)
A biennial event created to celebrate and appreciate basil, herbs and aromas from the Ponente Ligure, which this year is in its 5th edition. At the heart of ‘Aromatica’ are food and wine produced in the territory with initiatives which involve the whole of the Dianese gulf.

Gourmet Festival in Bolzano/Bozen, South Tyrol 24th-26th May 2013
This food and wine festival shows off the variety and quality of the South Tyrol regional products with a guarantee of origin in the product houses and market stalls of Bolzano’s old town.

Fritto Misto, in Marche 24th April – 1st May 2013 in Ascoli Piceno, Marche This event in its 5th year, celebrates all things “fried” and typically regional such as Marche’s “olive ascolane” (giant green olived filled with meat and deep fried), Sicily’s “arancini” (rice balls filled with meats or peas), Neapolitan “cannoli” (sweet conical cakes filled with ricotta), “frittura di pesce” (lightly fried mixed fish) and much more. A truly mouthwatering offering.


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Chocolate, wine and pizza: Six lessons to learn from Italian food culture - CultureMap Austin

Chocolate, wine and pizza: Six lessons to learn from Italian food culture
CultureMap Austin
Traveling for work is not always as glamorous as it sounds, but I've never had reason to complain about the wonderful food I get to eat while overseas.
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