Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning
329 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Learning in Translation

Learning in Translation | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
China is the next big market. No, it’s Brazil. Actually, forget everything and focus on Germany; that’s where business is going to boom.

For learning leaders facing globalization — which is many of them — trying to deliver the right language program at the right time can be a nightmare. Every year brings a new forecast for the next hot locale, and even for companies with a lingua franca — or a single declared language that the entire company uses — knowing how to speak with potential clients and partners abroad is imperative and difficult.

“Americans are famously, or infamously perhaps, not very capable with languages,” said Michael Quinlan, CEO of Transparent Language Inc., a learning development firm. “It’s not a moral failing. It’s demographic and geographic. You can live your life very happily with just English, and that’s a problem for us.”

Unlike businesses in more linguistically diverse areas like Europe or Asia, American companies often can’t hire someone fluent in two or three languages. Instead, they have to develop their workforce to meet the language requirements for the rest of the world’s economy — or at least their target customers and partners.

Fortunately for Americans, English is still the most common language used for business. In 2011, Bloomberg Rankings listed Mandarin Chinese, French and Arabic as the three that follow. The report raised eyebrows for its exclusion of Spanish, which is almost as vital as English to businesses operating solely on American soil; U.S. Census Bureau data from 2011 show 13 percent of the population speaks Spanish at home.

Hire to Cover the Skills Gap
In October 2013, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act implementer Covered California began taking calls from people looking to sign up for health insurance. But it wasn’t prepared to work with the state’s multilingual population.

Speaking the same language as a caller is more than a courtesy — it’s a necessity.  The state’s Department of Health Care Services identifies 13 “threshold languages” — such as Tagalog, Cantonese and Hmong — that are spoken at higher rates and can hinder access for those seeking services. Part of Covered California’s mission hinges on its representatives’ ability to successfully communicate complicated health insurance plans in these 13 languages.

Public Information Officer Roy Kennedy said because the organization was still building it staff in the first month of operations, it had to rely on an interpreter service to supplement the non-English calls representatives couldn’t handle.

But customers weren’t going to slow down just so Covered California could deploy language learning programs. To streamline operations and meet its goal to handle calls in 13-plus languages, Covered California changed its hiring practices.

In March 2014, the service center had 103 multi-lingual representatives who could answer calls, Kennedy said. By the end of the year, it had 219. Those hired who pass a non-English language test receive an additional $100 each month.

In addition to hiring bilingual staff, Covered California partnered with trusted organizations in communities where English isn’t the primary language.

“Having those partners in the communities where they’re already established was and still is an extremely important part of our enrollment efforts,” Kennedy said.  “Within our ranks … there are literally thousands who speak a language other than English.”  — Kate Everson

Language learning companies like Berlitz and Rosetta Stone Inc. report that English is still the most requested language around the world. But as much as Mandarin and Arabic have been touted as big for business, American customers request Spanish, German and French more often.

Judy Verses, president of global enterprise and education for Rosetta Stone, said corporate clients have started to want more Mandarin programs. She predicted that even though Mandarin is not yet in the top 10 languages the company teaches, it soon will be. Portuguese also has seen an increase in interest thanks to Brazil’s expanding economy.

Rosetta Stone conducted research in 2013 that showed 7 out of 10 business leaders plan to expand into non-English-speaking markets. But research completed by the Human Capital Media Advisory Group — commissioned by Rosetta Stone — showed only 3 out of 10 are investing in language skills training for their employees.

Having a multilingual workforce is sometimes a must-have rather than a nice-to-have. To make sure employees — and by extension, an organization — get the full benefits of language skill development, learning leaders have to ensure programs offer the right platforms and support.

Parlez-vous Flexibility?
It’s often said that the older a person is, the harder it is to learn a new language. Marty Abbott, executive director of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, said that age doesn’t hinder people’s ability to succeed, but it does change the way they have to learn.

For example, younger children exposed to language education can develop the right sounds, such as a rolling “r” in Spanish, before puberty shuts down the part of their brain that learns to make new sounds. Adults have to work around this.

But one advantage older learners have is their efficiency, Abbott said. “They can bump a new language against their native language with the ability to analyze differences.”

Language education has traditionally been one of the hardest things to deliver to employees; it requires more money, time and dedication than most other learning initiatives. As technology and accessibility change, however, it’s easier to deploy programs that employees can access inside or outside the office.

“Language learning is changing the same way that people had maps for thousands of years and now have GPS on their phones,” Quinlan said. “It’s all going to flip over in this decade and the next decade.”

One of Transparent Language’s government clients used to fly employees back to the U.S. and pay for their room and board while they went through a six-week course. Now the organization uses a virtual program that allows employees to stay in the countries where they’re assigned and complete four hours of class work over 12 weeks. Quinlan said annual proficiency tests have shown the same or better results since the transition.

Combining independent work with group interaction seems to be the best option for learners who can’t be immersed in a new language for hours each day. Anne-Marie Salmon, director of operations for Berlitz U.S., said face-to-face instruction can be supplemented with virtual online coursework and mobile apps to give employees the ability to work on their skills anywhere, anytime they have a chance.

“If you have a long gap in between classes, that’s when you forget,” Salmon said. “You really have to keep that momentum, and that’s where it’s good to have that flexibility to be able to use multiple platforms.”

Language learning needs the same flexibility that most other professional development programs require to be successful. The difference is learning leaders need to understand the amount of time needed, Salmon said.

Terms of Engagement
Flexibility in delivery helps stymie disengagement — one of language learning’s greatest enemies. But giving employees learning tools isn’t enough. Chief learning officers also must ensure they have the right content and support to keep them from getting bored or frustrated.

Rosetta Stone’s Verses said learner proficiency should be one of the first things CLOs consider when delivering language programs. Those who have some background in a language will be bored with beginner lessons, and those who have no knowledge will be intimidated if a program starts too specific or advanced. “It’s the Goldilocks principle,” Verses said. “It can’t be too hot or too cold.”

The content itself also holds keys to how learners latch onto languages — if employees are exposed to vocabulary and phrases that apply to their jobs, it’s more likely they’ll succeed.

Quinlan works with Operation Smile, a nonprofit group that performs surgery for children with cleft palates in impoverished countries, to help doctors and nurses communicate with their patients. “You would think, ‘We’re going to go to this country and do that, so we don’t have time to learn the language,’ but you can learn how to say, ‘This will only hurt for a second,’ and ‘Don’t worry,’ ” he said. “You can learn that kind of stuff really quickly, and it makes a huge difference for you to say it rather than an interpreter.”

Sometimes a few comforting phrases won’t cut it. The 2011 tsunami and subsequent nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, Japan, required members of the U.S. military to know Japanese vocabulary related to medical and nuclear science.

Most companies don’t face life-endangerment to promote language learning, but that doesn’t mean they can’t impress the importance of skill building on their employees. Verses said accountability can be one of the most stalwart motivators — a necessity if language learning isn’t going to get lost in the shuffle of everyday life.

CLOs can motivate employees by articulating where language learning fits into an organization’s overall mission. Simply acknowledging their accomplishments verbally also can help, but some companies offer raises or bonuses.

But “you can’t just buy access to a language for 100 people and expect that they’ll do it,” said Chuck McGonagle, senior vice president and general manager for Transparent Languages. “You have to monitor what they’re doing, be prodding and encouraging.”

Speaking of support, most of learning a language revolves around communicating with others, and Verses said learning leaders and managers can facilitate workplace clubs and mentorships that match language learners with native speakers who can help coach on pronunciation, accent and inflection. Coordinating that connection shows learners the organization is invested in their growth.

Culture Speaks Louder than Words
Being able to communicate in another language means more than knowing grammar and vocabulary. In many cases, knowledge of the culture trumps language fluency.

“You may be able to speak the language, but if you don’t understand how the message should be conveyed, it can lead to gaps and misunderstandings,” Berlitz’s Salmon said.


Figure 1: Language Skills Promote Productivity (Source: Rosetta Stone, 2015)
Salmon experienced this personally in 1991 when she moved to the U.S. from the United Kingdom. She believed that because she was a native English speaker, moving to another English-speaking country wouldn’t be a problem. Instead, it turned out to be more difficultthan her move from the U.S. to Mexico in 2010. “Everybody would invite me for lunch,” she said. “I thought ‘I’m never going to have time to have lunch with all these people.’ And then it never actually happened.”
“Have lunch” was an actual invitation to U.K.-raised Salmon rather than a nicety in America. She said that experience got her interested in cross-cultural education programs.

In one program, Salmon worked with Japanese employees who were competent in English but didn’t have the cultural knowledge to do business in the U.S. In Japan, people wait their turn to speak, so whenever one of these employees went to the U.S. or U.K., they sat silently through meetings. To the rest of the people at the table, they appeared disengaged or confused.

One way Salmon helps clients gauge their cultural expertise is through a platform called the Cultural Navigator, which includes a Cultural Orientation Indicator. Participants take an assessment to see how their business behavior compares with other countries’ workforce functions. Knowing how the two vary makes learners more conscious of how to modify their behavior to succeed in a different business arena.

Opening Doors and Closing Deals
Beyond opening doors to new markets, language education also affects the bottom line.

In preparation for its 2015 language awareness campaign “Lead With Language,” American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages found the highest challenge for small to medium enterprises looking to go global was an inability to communicate with non-English-speaking companies. Abbott said in one case, a farmer in Iowa was having a difficult time selling goods in Mexico because he didn’t employ anyone who spoke Spanish.

A company expanding its business to another country also can use language skills to bring cultural sensitivity into the boardroom, Verses said.

Even noninternational companies can benefit from cultural and lingual learning. The Aspen (Colorado) Ski Co., serves skiers from multiple countries, which means the staff has to communicate with them quickly in case of an emergency on the slopes.

Regardless which language is learned, companies usually see a rise in engagement. In a 2014 Rosetta Stone study, employees who were offered language education felt their employers were interested in their development — which turns into productivity (Figure 1).

“It has hard impact and soft impact,” Verses said. “And I’ve found that soft impact always translates into hard impact.”


Kate Everson is a Chief Learning Officer associate editor. Comment below or email editor@CLOmedia.com. Follow Everson on Twitter at @EversonKate. You can also follow her on  Google Plus.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

When does collaboration add value in the virtual classroom?

When does collaboration add value in the virtual classroom? | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Collaborative activities in virtual classrooms should be tightly focused on meeting learning objectives, not just interaction for the sake of it.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Virtual Instruction
Scoop.it!

Flipped Classrooms in Corporate Learning: Concept or reality?

Flipped Classrooms in Corporate Learning: Concept or reality? | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
The ways of Training and Learning in the corporate space are changing. With the advent of technology-enabled learning, corporate trainers are exploring newer ways of reaching out to learners. From ...

Via Cindy Carbajal
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

Three Myths of Online Learning - IEDP (blog)

Three Myths of Online Learning - IEDP (blog) | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
IEDP (blog)
Three Myths of Online Learning
IEDP (blog)
... the medium as impersonal and unengaging.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Social Media Management And Networking
Scoop.it!

16 Essential Tips for Planning a Virtual Classroom Event

16 Essential Tips for Planning a Virtual Classroom Event | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
Would you be interested in 16 essential tips when planning and preparing to host a virtual classroom event?

Via Rosanna M
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Really good tips.  I would also add that the Facilitator practice via multiple dry runs of the content and the platform tool.  Additionally, presentation slide decks, white board templates, etc. should be pre-loaded before the session as well as any handout material. If not working with a Producer, the Virtual Classroom Facilitator becomes the SME, the facilitator, and the technical problem solver.  This can be executed very successfully but only with focused preparation and lots of experience.  All of my live, virtual classroom training now is done without a Producer.  I'm totally comfortable and fine with it but I did not get to this points without years of practice.  

more...
Rosanna M's curator insight, June 24, 2013 9:40 PM

Extremely helpful tips for planning your next virtual classroom event.

Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

Nissan Realized It. Developing Leaders Globally

Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Nice case study.  I am very passionate about the power and potential of VILT when its done right.  This Nissan case study is a great example.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

How long should online classes be? Four questions to ask | The Virtual Presenter

How long should online classes be? Four questions to ask | The Virtual Presenter | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
After today’s Power of Story in the Virtual Classroom event, Angela asked, “What do you believe is the longest learning session can be in...
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Good information.  I can personally attest to the ability to deliver live, virtual classroom training in a 3-5 hour session duration BUT, the design has to facilitate high engagement and interaction and you have to factor in time for short breaks.  I have helped corporate clients move, as an example, 24 hour/3 day classes to the Virtual platform.  The design had to change of course to accommodate the footprint change, breakout room exercises, and the need to embed frequent interactive activities including chat, polls, surveys, whiteboard work, and breakout rooms.  I agree with the author that any session that is poorly designed, no matter what the length, will not be successful.  With live virtual classroom training, the elements of design, engagement and facilitation takes on much higher level of importance.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from elearning stuff
Scoop.it!

Four Steps to Effective Virtual Classroom Training by Ruth Clark : Learning Solutions Magazine

Four Steps to Effective Virtual Classroom Training by Ruth Clark : Learning Solutions Magazine | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Via steve batchelder
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

In this article, Ruth Clark, a noted industry expert on virtual learning, shares insights on research studies that reveal no degradation of the learning process when moving from traditional classroom delivery to a virtual platform. Additionally, Ruth Clark shares her four step process to effective virtual training.  As one who has delivered synchronous virtual training for over 15 years, I can attest to the legitimacy of Dr. Clark's work.  Additionally, as stated in the article, virtual synchronous training can actually be a better, more effective learning experience than traditional classroom training.  Read the article for the real deal. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Lifelong Learning and Collaborative Learning
Scoop.it!

Tasks of the Virtual Classroom Producer | Langevin - Blog

Tasks of the Virtual Classroom Producer | Langevin - Blog | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
In the training world, specifically, the virtual classroom (VC) training world, the term “producer” means something very different.

Via Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

When just starting out with virtual classroom delivery, the role of a Producer can contribute to delivering a WOW learning experience. This article does a great job in explaining the role of a Virtual Classroom Producer.  A must read for trainers and facilitators just starting with Virtual Classroom delivery.

more...
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

Asynchronous or Synchronous? Which do you prefer? | Digital Learning

Asynchronous or Synchronous? Which do you prefer? | Digital Learning | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
Good complement to our article @bardmeier Asynchronous or Synchronous? Which do you prefer? http://t.co/BHiTlI8g0K #digped
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

This is good articles that shares light on what's required for a synchronous session to be delivered as an effective learning forum.  It addresses some of the capabilities of the instructor. Excellent food for thought. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

E-learning: How to deliver an engaging Virtual Classroom presentation

Learn How to Deliver an Engaging Virtual Classroom Presentation in Under 10 Minutes! and get the results you want! Get more info here: http//www.facilitador....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

- Converting your Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction - Step 1: Analyzing Your Existing Instruction and Your Audience

- Converting your Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction - Step 1: Analyzing Your Existing Instruction and Your Audience | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Converting your Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction - Step 1: Analyzing Your Existing Instruction and Your Audience

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Using Technology to Manage a Class
Scoop.it!

Virtual Icebreakers | Trainers Warehouse Blog

Virtual Icebreakers | Trainers Warehouse Blog | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Via Maureen Hogan Shanahan
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Really good icebreakers suggestions with delivering live virtual classes.  I've used several with tremendous success.  It really get the class off to a good start and begins to create a bond between learners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

5-Star Virtual Classroom Strategy [VIDEO] | WPLMS - Lia Sant edufolio

5-Star Virtual Classroom Strategy [VIDEO] | WPLMS - Lia Sant edufolio | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
Virtual classrooms via webmeetings and video can be a drag, especially if the content is strictly done in PowerPoint while the facilitator drones on and on, reading the slides. Stop doing the same old thing and spice up your ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Edublog
Scoop.it!

Energize Virtual Classroom Participation

Energize Virtual Classroom Participation | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
You know the frustrations of teaching in a virtual classroom.Keeping participants engaged is like trying to teach a class right after lunch.

Via Zrinka Maroja
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from virtualclassroom
Scoop.it!

Icebreakers for the Live Virtual Classroom — Web Conference Guru

Icebreakers for the Live Virtual Classroom — Web Conference Guru | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Most trainers understand the importance of beginning a training session with an icebreaker to get participants warmed up and ready to learn. Icebreakers in the virtual classroom serve an important dual purpose of not only ...


Via Colin Steed
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Good icebreaker suggestions in this article. I've tried them and found them to be very effective in immediately engaging the learners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

Designing Virtual Training Webinars | Cindy Huggett

Designing Virtual Training Webinars | Cindy Huggett | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
A big 'thank you' to everyone who attended this week's session: “Design is Everything: 5 Techniques for Designing an Interactive Virtual Class.” If you are looking for the handout or any checklists that I mentioned, look under ...
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Good stuff.  I attended this session and found it very useful.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Technology in Today's Classroom
Scoop.it!

Here it is: The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2013

Here it is: The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2013 | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

Jane Hart..


Via John Purificati
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

Excellent list.  I've used Adobe Connect, Powerpoint, WebEx, Saba Centra and Microsoft Live Meeting for the development and delivery of live, synchronous virtual training.  WebEx is still my favorite because of its ease of use and versatility.  I'm not saying its the best, but given that I have frequently delivered V-ILT courses with footprints of 5 hours per day for 5 consecutive days audiences to class participants dispersed world-wide, WebEx has more than met my needs and my expectations.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from one-to-one pedagogy
Scoop.it!

Ten Ideas for Exercises in the Virtual Classroom — Web Conference Guru

Ten Ideas for Exercises in the Virtual Classroom — Web Conference Guru | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
If you have either attended or facilitated training in a virtual classroom you know that maintaining a high level of interactivity is key to keeping participants engaged.  Here are ten ideas for exercises to try in your next virtual classroom...

Via iKiki
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

This is a must read for those virtual instructors looking for virtual classroom exercises to keep participants engaged.  This list provides useful examples of what can be use, how and for what purpose.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones from Let's Teach
Scoop.it!

Converting Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction: Some Tips by Joel Gendelman : Learning Solutions Magazine

Converting Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction: Some Tips by Joel Gendelman : Learning Solutions Magazine | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it

RT @nzelearning: Learning solutions: Converting Classroom Training to Virtual Instruction: Some Tips by Joel Gendelman http://t.co/LynUrivK


Via Karen Walstra
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

If you are looking for more tips to converting traditional classroom training to the virtual classroom environment, this is an excellent article.  Many companies who are making the transition fail to consider the challenges.  Check out this article and understand what it takes to do it right.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones
Scoop.it!

Best Practices in Converting Instructor Led Training to Virtual Classroom Content

Best Practices in Converting Instructor Led Training to Virtual Classroom Content | Virtual Instructor Led Training - Beyond e-learning | Scoop.it
Wednesday, February 26, 1:00 PM EST (GMT -5) (Hear best practices from Saba on converting instructor-led training to virtual classrooms, tomorrow @ 1pm http://t.co/op96D3cObh #webinar)...
Dr. Janet Lockhart-Jones's insight:

This webinar has ended but you can register to listen to and view the presentation.  This session covers excellent best practices in converting traditional led training to virtual classroom content.

more...
No comment yet.