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WARNING: BS ALERT! Drones to Forcibly Vaccinate the Public?

WARNING: BS ALERT! Drones to Forcibly Vaccinate the Public? | Virology News | Scoop.it
Infowars.com | Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funds research into UAV vaccine delivery.

Many were alarmed to learn online retail giant Amazon was considering using drones to deliver products, however a proposed future use for drones is infinitely more sinister and concerning.

 

Ed Rybicki's insight:

So these guys take a story about using drones - unpersonned aerial vehicles - to DELIVER vaccines to remote or inaccessible areas, and turn it into anti-vax hype about using drones to VACCINATE people??

Truly the silly season....

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Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people. And other things.
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Destroying the last samples of smallpox virus could prove short-sighted

Destroying the last samples of smallpox virus could prove short-sighted | Virology News | Scoop.it
Tania Browne: The discovery of intact vials of smallpox in a storeroom last week demonstrates the need to maintain samples of the virus in secure facilities for future vaccine research
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Ebola: the epidemic that’s ‘out of control’

Ebola: the epidemic that’s ‘out of control’ | Virology News | Scoop.it
It’s official: The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is spreading faster than anyone can deal with it. There are 518 deaths already, with plenty more expected as governments scramble to provide an effective response.
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'Teaching People to Fish' Through Biotechnology

'Teaching People to Fish' Through Biotechnology | Virology News | Scoop.it
Dennis Gonsalves and I had lunch at Zippys awhile back with Lawrence Kent of the Gates Foundation. Lawrence told us the Gates Foundation is sponsoring GM plant research to help the poorest of the poor. It's a significant project, though just a small percent of the whole Gates Foundation effort.

I asked him about commercial banana research. He said they don't do anything with commercial projects. Oh shucks, I thought.

But Dennis Gonsalves is working with Lawrence on a virus-resistant cassava project for Africa. Can you imagine: Local Kohala boy Dennis Gonsalves working with the Gates Foundation to help save lives of the poorest of the poor in sub-Saharan Africa? Wow.

I wrote about Hillary Clinton talking about the State Department moving from emergency feeding of the poor to GM plants that provide people with solutions they need to sustain themselves. Replacing emergency feeding programs with GM solutions gives farmers biotech tools to enhance their food production and vitamin content and more.

It's kind of like the old saying: Give a man a fish and feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime.

Golden rice is an example of this kind of humanitarian effort. Another is the vitamin A-enhanced banana developed in north Queensland, Australia that was recently announced.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I've also had lunch with Dennis Gonsalves, as it happens, as well as hearing him announce the first transgenic papaya in Geneva, NY, in 1991.  Nice to hear it's still doing well!

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Test vaccine for dengue fever seen as promising

Test vaccine for dengue fever seen as promising | Virology News | Scoop.it
Test vaccine for dengue fever seen as promising
Raw Story
A prototype vaccine for dengue that two years ago yielded lukewarm results has proved more effective after wider trials and is a potential arm against the disease, researchers said Friday.
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CDC Closes Anthrax and Bird Flu Labs After Accidents

CDC Closes Anthrax and Bird Flu Labs After Accidents | Virology News | Scoop.it

Concluding its investigation into the unintended anthrax exposure at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, the CDC says it has found another more "distressing" problem due to l

ab workers not following protocol.

The CDC held a news conference to discuss the conclusion of its investigation Friday. It determined that while it is “not impossible” that the staff was exposed to viable B. anthracis (anthrax), it is “extremely unlikely” that this happened.

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SMALLPOX: FORGOTTEN STOCK DISCOVERED

SMALLPOX: FORGOTTEN STOCK DISCOVERED | Virology News | Scoop.it
SMALLPOX: FORGOTTEN STOCK DISCOVERED *********************************************** A ProMED-mail post Date: 11 Jul 2014 Source: CNN News source [edited] At least 2 of the vials employees at the National Institutes of Health found in an unused storage room earlier this month [July 2014] contain viable samples of the deadly smallpox virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday [11 Jul 2014]. Employees found 6 forgotten vials when they were preparing to move a lab from the Food and Drug Administration's Bethesda, Maryland campus to a different location. The laboratory had been used by the NIH but was transferred to the FDA in 1972. When the scientists found the vials, they immediately put them in a containment lab, and on 1 Jul 2014 notified the branch of the government that deals with toxic substances, called the Division of Select Agents and Toxins. The CDC said previously there is no evidence that any of the vials was breached, nor were any of the lab workers exposed to the virus. On Monday [7 Jul 2014], law enforcement agencies transferred the vials to the CDC's high-containment facility in Atlanta. The CDC is one of only 2 official World Health Organization designated repositories for smallpox. CDC Director Tom Frieden said his scientists worked through the night on the samples as soon as they got them. Testing confirmed that there was variola DNA in the vials. Additional test results showed "evidence of growth" in samples from 2 of the vials, suggesting that the smallpox virus is alive. Smallpox, known also by its scientific name as variola, was the deadly virus that was the scourge of civilization for centuries. It's been considered an eradicated disease since 1980, following successful worldwide vaccination programs. The last known outbreak in the U.S. was in 1947 in New York. The vials concerned were created on 10 Feb 1954, that is, before the smallpox eradication campaign began. Frieden says that the NIH is currently scouring their buildings to make sure there are no other surprises left in unused storerooms. He says the problem in this case is not in the creation of the vials; the discovery points to a "problem in inventory control." [Byline: Jen Christensen] -- Communicated by: ProMED-mail [The survival of viable lyophilized (freeze-dried) smallpox virus for 60 years is a new record. The Public Health Agency of Canada states in its Pathogen Safety Data Sheet and Risk Assessment for Vaccinia Virus: "The dried virus can survive up to 39 weeks at 6.7 percent moisture and 4 C," . There was never any chance that this find would start an epidemic, and even if a vial had been broken and had infected anyone, the outbreak would have rapidly been eradicated by ring vaccination, just as it had been in 1980. - Mod.JW Smallpox virus graphic from Russell Kightley Media
Ed Rybicki's insight:
Really, really stable virus...I wonder how more there is out there?
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How deforestation shares the blame for the Ebola epidemic

How deforestation shares the blame for the Ebola epidemic | Virology News | Scoop.it
Deforestation has decimated West Africa. It's also possibly given rise to Ebola outbreaks.

Like most matters involving an Ebola epidemic, chronicling its first horrifying infection is not an easy endeavor. But even in circumstances in which details are hard to come by, certain similarities have emerged. The first contact often occurs in remote, rural communities where a victim handles an infected animal carcass, and things quickly progress downward from there.

One outbreak in Ivory Coast was sparked when an ethologist touched an infected, dead chimpanzee. In Gabon and the Republic of Congo, scientists linked several outbreaks to extensive deaths of forest chimpanzees and gorillas. And in this most current outbreak of Ebola in West Africa — which has been called “out of control” and has claimed at least 481 lives in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia — is also believed to have begun in a remote location in the town of Gueckedou.

The commonality between numerous outbreaks of Ebola, scientists say, is growing human activity and deforestation in previously untouched forests, bringing humans into closer contact with rare disease strains viral enough to precipitate an epidemic.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

I vividly remember the legendary Bob Swanepoel saying, at a conference we organised in Cape Town in 2009, that:

"It was frightening to think that, as I stood in a clearing looking into the rainforest, Ebola was probably looking back at me".

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Vaccine production expanding in developing countries

Vaccine production expanding in developing countries | Virology News | Scoop.it

BioProcess International recently took a look at the growing manufacturing demand in developing countries of vaccines. The big four Pharma companies are in control of the majority of the production of vaccines: Sanofi, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline and Pfizer.  With the world wide market valued at $30 billion a year, vaccines are in demand and widely considered a right and often create a healthier public.  As many governments are the only suppliers of healthcare in growing countries, they find the need to be able to produce these products within their borders so that they can reach their citizens.  New technologies are expanding the capabilities making vaccines affordable, quick and feasible in many of these countries.

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HIV Drug Could Reduce Risk Of Genital Herpes

HIV Drug Could Reduce Risk Of Genital Herpes | Virology News | Scoop.it
According to a new study, Truvada may help reduce the risk of getting genital herpes.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Although the site says "warts".  Civilians...!!!

 

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Could a Cow Virus Cause Colon Cancer?

Could a Cow Virus Cause Colon Cancer? | Virology News | Scoop.it

I heard Harald zur Hausen hypothesize that a cow virus might be responsible for most cases of colon cancer.

And why should anyone pay attention to what Harald Zur Hausen thinks? Well, he won a Nobel Prize in 2008 for proving that most cases of cervical cancer are caused by a few strains of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Nor is HPV the only viral cause of cancer. Chronic infection with certain hepatitis viruses, for example, is a major cause of liver cancer.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Just as we submit a grant application for looking at this very thing....

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Swine flu virus which killed half-million modified to 'incurable' - NOT!

Swine flu virus which killed half-million modified to 'incurable' - NOT! | Virology News | Scoop.it
A controversial flu researcher has modified the flu virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic to allow it evade the human immune system. His lab’s previous works include recreating the Spanish flu and making a deadly bird flu strain highly transmittable.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Sorry, this is simple-minded hype: what Kawaoka and team did was to select antibody binding escape mutants from H1N1pdm 2009 virus - which means that what they did was effectively recreate the original virus, in terms of its ability to infect people - POTENTIALLY.

 

And let's remember, the H1N1pdm virus was only about as bad as the circulating seasonal viruses at causing disease - as in, "not very"!

 

Additionally, calling the mutant virus "incurable" is simply inaccurate: there is NO evidence presented that the mutants are resistant to Tamiflu or other drugs, and NO evidence that they in fact infect humans at all.

 

I would be willing to bet that even if they escape antibodies specific for H1N1pdm, that they would NOT escape cellular immune responses - which are generally more broad-based in terms of antigenic specificity than anti-flu antibody responses.

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HPV vaccine indicated for treating anal cancers

HPV vaccine indicated for treating anal cancers | Virology News | Scoop.it
HPV vaccine indicated for treating anal cancers Nursing Times The European Commission has approved the use of Gardasil – the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine – for preventing anal precancerous lesions and anal cancers that are causally...
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Ebola virus: Can nations stop deadliest ever outbreak from spreading?

Ebola virus: Can nations stop deadliest ever outbreak from spreading? | Virology News | Scoop.it
CNN
Ebola virus: Can nations stop deadliest ever outbreak from spreading?
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Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine is NOT dangerous

Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine is NOT dangerous | Virology News | Scoop.it
Parents worried about having their children vaccinated take note: a new study published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics has found that (Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine is NOT dangerous (recent publication in Pediatrics)
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No link between HPV vaccine Gardasil and increased blood clot risk

No link between HPV vaccine Gardasil and increased blood clot risk | Virology News | Scoop.it
A new study involving half a million female subjects in Denmark contradicts previous reports of a possibility that HPV vaccine, which is given to prevent genital warts and certain cancers, causes serious blood clots.
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Vaccine combination may help eradicate polio

Vaccine combination may help eradicate polio | Virology News | Scoop.it
Combining two types of polio vaccine, including one that is injected rather than given orally, appears to give better immunity and could speed efforts to eradicate the crippling disease, scientists said on Friday.

British and Indian researchers said the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), which is given by injection, could provide better and longer lasting protection if given alongside the more commonly used live oral polio vaccine (OPV).

Serious polio outbreaks in Asia, Africa and Europe over the last 10 years have hampered efforts to wipe out the disease, caused by a virus that replicates in the gut and can be passed on through contact with infected faeces.

Polio invades the nervous system and can cause irreversible paralysis within hours - and the World Health Organization's repeated warning is that as long as any child remains infected with polio, children everywhere are at risk.

Most vaccination campaigns - including emergency ones that were started last year covering 20 million children in Syria and neighboring countries - use multiple doses of OPV to boost immunity among those at risk.

"Because IPV is injected into the arm, rather than taken orally, it's been assumed it doesn't provide much protection in the gut and so would be less effective at preventing faecal transmission than OPV," said Jacob John, an associate professor at the India's Christian Medical College, who led the study.

But his team's research, which covered 450 children from a densely populated urban area in Vellore, India, found that where they already had a level of immunity due to OPV, the injected vaccine actually boosted their gut immunity.

"It looks as if the strongest immunity can been achieved through a combination of the two," he said.

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Hints of Life’s Start Found in a Giant Virus

Hints of Life’s Start Found in a Giant Virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
Newly discovered specimens support a more ancient origin for viruses, perhaps all the way back to the origins of life.

Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie were used to finding strange viruses. The married virologists at Aix-Marseille University had made a career of it. But pithovirus, which they discovered in 2013 in a sample of Siberian dirt that had been frozen for more than 30,000 years, was more bizarre than the pair had ever imagined a virus could be.

In the world of microbes, viruses are small — notoriously small. Pithovirus is not. The largest virus ever discovered, pithovirus is more massive than even some bacteria. Most viruses copy themselves by hijacking their host’s molecular machinery. But pithovirus is much more independent, possessing some replication machinery of its own. Pithovirus’s relatively large number of genes also differentiated it from other viruses, which are often genetically simple — the smallest have a mere four genes. Pithovirus has around 500 genes, and some are used for complex tasks such as making proteins and repairing and replicating DNA. “It was so different from what we were taught about viruses,” Abergel said.

The stunning find, first revealed in March, isn’t just expanding scientists’ notions of what a virus can be. It is reframing the debate over the origins of life.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Viva, viruses!!

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Girl Thought To Have Been Cured Of HIV Has Relapse

Girl Thought To Have Been Cured Of HIV Has Relapse | Virology News | Scoop.it
News One Girl Thought To Have Been Cured Of HIV Has Relapse News One A Mississippi girl born with HIV who was thought to be cured by immediate and aggressive drug treatment has relapsed, with new tests showing detectable levels of the AIDS-causing...
Ed Rybicki's insight:
Very sad.
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Bushmeat in the Time of Ebola

Bushmeat in the Time of Ebola | Virology News | Scoop.it
VICE News went to the bushmeat markets in Liberia, where the most recent outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus is said to have originated.

Via Ken Yaw Agyeman-Badu
Ed Rybicki's insight:
Thanks, Ken!
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Ken Yaw Agyeman-Badu's curator insight, July 9, 3:30 AM

I love this documentary - Bushmeat in the Time of Ebola.

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Newly Discovered Smallpox Samples at NIH

Newly Discovered Smallpox Samples at NIH | Virology News | Scoop.it

On July 1, 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) notified the appropriate regulatory agency, the Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that employees discovered vials labeled ”variola,” commonly known as smallpox, in an unused portion of a storage room in a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) laboratory located on the NIH Bethesda campus.

The laboratory was among those transferred from NIH to FDA in 1972, along with the responsibility for regulating biologic products. The FDA has operated laboratories located on the NIH campus since that time. Scientists discovered the vials while preparing for the laboratory’s move to the FDA’s main campus.  

The vials appear to date from the 1950s. Upon discovery, the vials were immediately secured in a CDC-registered select agent containment laboratory in Bethesda. 

 

Smallpox virus graphic from Russell Kightley Media

Ed Rybicki's insight:

"DSAT, in collaboration with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, is actively investigating the history of how these samples were originally prepared and subsequently stored in the FDA laboratory."


Why??  They're from the 1950s, for firkin' hell's sake!  Variola was a pretty common thing to have around at the time - it was still killing millions of people a year!!

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Conservation of T cell epitopes between seasonal influenza viruses and the novel influenza A H7N9 virus

Conservation of T cell epitopes between seasonal influenza viruses and the novel influenza A H7N9 virus | Virology News | Scoop.it

Abstract: A novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus recently emerged in the Yangtze River delta and caused diseases, often severe, in over 130 people. This H7N9 virus appeared to infect humans with greater ease than previous avian influenza virus subtypes such as H5N1 and H9N2. While there are other potential explanations for this large number of human infections with an avian influenza virus, we investigated whether a lack of conserved T-cell epitopes between endemic H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses and the novel H7N9 virus contributes to this observation. Here we demonstrate that a number of T cell epitopes are conserved between endemic H1N1 and H3N2 viruses and H7N9 virus. Most of these conserved epitopes are from viral internal proteins. The extent of conservation between endemic human seasonal influenza and avian influenza H7N9 was comparable to that with the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1. Thus, the ease of inter-species transmission of H7N9 viruses (compared with avian H5N1 viruses) cannot be attributed to the lack of conservation of such T cell epitopes. On the contrary, our fi ndings predict significant T-cell based cross-reactions in the human population to the novel H7N9 virus. Our findings also have implications for H7N9 virus vaccine design. Influenza virus graphic courtesy of Russell Kightley Media

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"Ebola Outbreak Decimates African Countries, Masturbation To Blame". Giggle.

"Ebola Outbreak Decimates African Countries, Masturbation To Blame". Giggle. | Virology News | Scoop.it
DARKEST AFRICA- SMNNN Ebola, feared disease who's horrible symptoms include organ explosion and puss legions, and eventually, painful excruciating death, is now spreading rapidly across the countri...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Sorry - this combined two of my favourite things: viruses and atheism.

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Vaccine Side Effects Are Very, Very Rare

Vaccine Side Effects Are Very, Very Rare | Virology News | Scoop.it
Vaccine Side Effects Are Very, Very Rare: Study Huffington Post Canada Some childhood vaccines are linked to serious side effects, but they are quite rare and do not include autism, food allergies or cancer, said a review of scientific literature...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Amen amen!!

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"Scientist Creates New Flu Virus That Can Kill All Of Humanity!" Yah, sure.

"Scientist Creates New Flu Virus That Can Kill All Of Humanity!"  Yah, sure. | Virology News | Scoop.it
Working at a lab with a relatively low level-two biosafety rating, University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka has created a strain of...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Hype and bullsh1t.  If it - H1N1pdm 2009 - didn't kill all of humanity when it caused a pandemic, why would a new strain of it (which is all Kawaoka's escape mutants are) do it?  Simple-minded crap.

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Childhood Vaccines Vindicated Once More

Childhood Vaccines Vindicated Once More | Virology News | Scoop.it
No link to autism found in large review of previous research on measles, mumps, rubella vaccine.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Amen!!

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