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Mexican Authorities: More Than 1 Million Chickens Exposed to Bird Flu - Fox News Latino

Mexican Authorities: More Than 1 Million Chickens Exposed to Bird Flu - Fox News Latino | Virology News | Scoop.it
Latinos Post Mexican Authorities: More Than 1 Million Chickens Exposed to Bird Flu Fox News Latino The outbreak of bird flu detected in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato is confined to 12 farms that have more than 1 million chickens, the...
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Again??  Vaccines, people!!

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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Mimi- and related viruses - making us think again about virus classification?

Mimi- and related viruses - making us think again about virus classification? | Virology News | Scoop.it
This article - by one of the discoverers of Mimivirus - argues that the new giant DNA viruses are different from other viruses and that as a result, we neew to create a new brach of microbes. Other virologists are more cautious, suggesting that Mimivirus can fit within the current scheme of virus taxonomy. Either…
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I don't think that The Big Lads justify a new domain of life: while they may be the largest monophyletic group of viruses with the most ancient provenance, they are not the ONLY monophyletic group.  A good case could be made for caudoviruses (Order Caudovirales) too; the ss(+)RNA viruses are also probably ancient and have a variety of origins - so there is nothing special about Mimi and her cousins, other than they are (so far) the most complex viruses in terms of genome size and encoded content.

They are still most certainly viruses, by all of the best accepted definitions (including mine B-), in that they are still obligate intracellular parasites that do not have a translational apparatus, and which cause particles to be assembled to transport their genomes.

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Sad State of Phage Electron Microscopy. Please Shoot the Messenger

Sad State of Phage Electron Microscopy. Please Shoot  the Messenger | Virology News | Scoop.it
Two hundred and sixty publications from 2007 to 2012 were classified according to the quality of electron micrographs; namely as good (71); mediocre (21); or poor (168). Publications were from 37 countries; appeared in 77 journals; and included micrographs produced with about 60 models of electron microscopes. The quality of the micrographs was not linked to any country; journal; or electron microscope. Main problems were poor contrast; positive staining; low magnification; and small image size. Unsharp images were frequent. Many phage descriptions were silent on virus purification; magnification control; even the type of electron microscope and stain used. The deterioration in phage electron microscopy can be attributed to the absence of working instructions and electron microscopy courses; incompetent authors and reviewers; and lenient journals. All these factors are able to cause a gradual lowering of standards.

 

Good phage picture from Ed Rybicki's collection B-)

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A WONDERFUL rant from an old-style perfectionist!  Thanks, Marla!!

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Herpes virus closes National Stud in Newmarket

Herpes virus closes National Stud in Newmarket | Virology News | Scoop.it
The National Stud in Newmarket is closed following the discovery of a neurological herpes virus infection.
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Relive the nightmare of an old-school computer virus at the new Malware museum

Relive the nightmare of an old-school computer virus at the new Malware museum | Virology News | Scoop.it
The Malware Museum lets you relive the feeling of watching some of the earliest viruses infect an MS-DOS computer.
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Hey, if we do zombies we can certainly do computer viruses too?!

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Oz oyster growers facing deadly virus want government help

Oz oyster growers facing deadly virus want government help | Virology News | Scoop.it
The head of Tasmania's oyster industry says workers are likely to be sacked as Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome devastates some growing regions, leaving the industry in need a recovery package.
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3 reasons not to panic over the Zika virus

3 reasons not to panic over the Zika virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
It’s easy to be alarmed by the Zika virus spreading across the Americas, but there are plenty of reasons not to be worried about it at all.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Amen!!

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Benin: WHO’s medical detectives work with national health authorities to solve a mystery

Benin: WHO’s medical detectives work with national health authorities to solve a mystery | Virology News | Scoop.it
The Ebola preparedness team visits the traditional healer whose family lost several members to the Lassa fever outbreak in and around Tanguiéta.
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Nine people suspected dead of Lassa fever in Benin

Nine people suspected dead of Lassa fever in Benin | Virology News | Scoop.it
As the world ramps up its fight against the Zika virus, West Africa is battling to contain a growing outbreak of Lassa fever with nine people in Benin reported dead.
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There ARE other diseases....

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Honeybee virus spread by human activity

Honeybee virus spread by human activity | Virology News | Scoop.it
Deformed wing virus reduces the winter survival of European honeybees (Apis mellifera), and could be a factor in the large colony losses seen in some parts of the world. To find out how the virus became pandemic, Lena Wilfert at the University of Exeter, UK, and her colleagues analysed the virus's genome to reconstruct its evolutionary and geographical history.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I think human activity is pretty much to blame for nearly ALL outbreaks of infectious disease of recent times?

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Vaccines: The economic value of the public health tool

Vaccines: The economic value of the public health tool | Virology News | Scoop.it
Vaccinations, long recognized as an excellent investment that saves lives and prevents illness, could have significant economic value that far exceeds their original cost, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.
In what is believed to be among the first studies to examine the potential return on investment of vaccinations, the researchers assessed the economic benefits of vaccines in 94 low- and middle-income countries using projected vaccination rates from 2011 to 2020. When looking only at costs associated with illness, such as treatment costs and productivity losses, the return was $16 for every dollar spent on vaccines. In a separate analysis taking into account the broader economic impact of illness, vaccinations save $44 for every dollar spent.
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Central African Republic: No new cases of monkeypox

Central African Republic: No new cases of monkeypox | Virology News | Scoop.it

In a follow-up story on the monkeypox outbreak in the Central African Republic (CAR), health officials say that no new monkeypox cases have been reported in Bangassou, according to a Journal De Bangui report (computer translated).


Monkeypox/CDC

“All the patients we have received and which were isolated at the hospital here, are healed and have already returned to their families. So I can confirm that at this time, no cases of ill monkeypox virus is reported in Bangassou “, noted John Paul Ogbia.

The doctor spoke, however, a suspect case. John Paul Ogbia announced the arrival of a verification mission in Bakouma which is part of the disease , “the first two people who had presented this disease had come from Bakouma. We will organize a working mission in the coming days in this location to check the situation in the city “ he said.

 
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Nigeria battling fresh outbreak of the deadly Lassa fever

Nigeria battling fresh outbreak of the deadly Lassa fever | Virology News | Scoop.it
Nigeria is facing a growing outbreak of a deadly virus similar to Ebola which has already killed 101 people since August.
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Nigeria Contained Ebola; Can We Contain Lassa Fever and Zika Virus?

Nigeria Contained Ebola; Can We Contain Lassa Fever and Zika Virus? | Virology News | Scoop.it
On the 14th January 2016, the World Health Organisation declared an end of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Less than a day later, a new case in Sierra Leone was detected, indicating that the pat...
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Yellow fever outbreak: 37 dead in Angola

Yellow fever outbreak: 37 dead in Angola | Virology News | Scoop.it

In an update on the yellow fever outbreak that began in Luanda, Angola in December, health officials say the death toll has climbed to 37.

Angola
Image/CIA
National Director of Health, Mr Adelaide de Carvalho said health officials were monitoring suburbs around the capital of Luanda where infections have been worsened by unsanitary conditions caused by a garbage collection backlog.
“Actions should be developed for the improvement of public sanitary and garbage collection,” de Carvalho said.
On Wednesday, The National Commission for Civil Protection, coordinated by the Interior Minister Interior, Ângelo de Barros Veiga Tavares, held an extraordinary session in order to analyze the situation of endemic outbreak of yellow fever.
According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Yellow fever virus is found in tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa. The virus is transmitted to people by the bite of an infected mosquito.

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Human papillomavirus strongly linked to risk of breast cancer

Human papillomavirus strongly linked to risk of breast cancer | Virology News | Scoop.it
Women with abnormal cells on their cervix owing to certain types of human papillomavirus likely to be at higher risk of developing breast cancer later in life
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Bovine viral diarrhoea virus could cause $2.6m loss in New Zealand

Bovine viral diarrhoea virus could cause $2.6m loss in New Zealand | Virology News | Scoop.it
Bovine viral diarrhoea could be costing Southland up to $2.6 million a year.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Cows, dogs, bees, computers - we do all kinds of viruses B-)

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A Deadly Bee Virus Is Spreading and Only Humans Can Stop It

A Deadly Bee Virus Is Spreading and Only Humans Can Stop It | Virology News | Scoop.it
Across the world, bees are succumbing to a deadly virus, and a new study places the blame squarely on humans. The good news is, there are some common-sense measures we can take right now to start protecting the honeybees we rely on to pollinate our crops.
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Dog flu virus H3N2 spreads rapidly to 28 US states, including Ohio

Dog flu virus H3N2 spreads rapidly to 28 US states, including Ohio | Virology News | Scoop.it
The new dog flu H3N2 virus infected more than 2,000 dogs in Chicago last March and since has spread to both coasts.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

More not-Zika

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Zika virus: Inside Uganda's forest where the disease originates - BBC News

Zika virus: Inside Uganda's forest where the disease originates - BBC News | Virology News | Scoop.it
The BBC's Catherine Byaruhanga visits a Ugandan forest where the deadly Zika virus was first discovered seven decades ago.
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"The Aedes we have, Aedes aegypti formosus, normally does not bite humans. And then we have other [mosquitoes] which live in the forests and prefer to bite at dusk and dawn,"

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UNICEF and WHO help fight Lassa Fever outbreak in Benin

UNICEF and WHO help fight Lassa Fever outbreak in Benin | Virology News | Scoop.it
COTONOU, Benin, 10 February 2016 – Alarmed by an outbreak of deadly Lassa Fever, UNICEF and World Health Organization officials in Benin are scaling up an emergency response to help prevent further spread of the disease.
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Cytomegalovirus causes microcephaly in babies, and it’s much wider spread than Zika

Cytomegalovirus causes microcephaly in babies, and it’s much wider spread than Zika | Virology News | Scoop.it
The potential link between the Zika virus and brain malformations in babies is terrifying pregnant women around the world. But even in places not hit by the virus, kids are at risk of being born with microcephaly, or a smaller-than-average brain. Many of those cases are caused by a virus you’ve probably never heard of:...
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Cape Verde: 7,000 Zika cases, No microcephaly

Cape Verde: 7,000 Zika cases, No microcephaly | Virology News | Scoop.it
Officials with the Cape Verde Ministry of Health (computer translated) are reporting 7,164 Zika virus cases since first being confirmed in the capital city of Praia last October, while at the same time reporting no occurrences of microcephaly.

Image/CDC
Health officials do however report a downward trajectory in cases in the country.
Most cases were recorded in Praia (4,837), followed by São Filipe, on Fogo Island (1230) and the island of Maio (501).
According to the ministry, the transmission of the virus is now specifically occurring on the islands of Santiago and Fogo, and for the second consecutive week, there were no cases in the Isle of May.
Local transmission cases have not been recorded on the islands of Santo Antao, Sao Nicolau, São Vicente, Sal and Brava.
Health authorities have no records of complications associated with the virus or cases of neurological disorder.
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Philippines reports more than 200,000 dengue cases in 2015

Philippines reports more than 200,000 dengue cases in 2015 | Virology News | Scoop.it

The “preliminary” final numbers are finally out and the Philippines saw an increase in dengue fever of nearly 65 percent in 2015 compared to the prior year. Through Dec. 31, the archipelago reported  200,415 suspected cases of dengue, including 598 deaths.

 
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Nigeria: Lassa fever outbreak could kill 1,000 people as virus spreads to 17 states

Nigeria: Lassa fever outbreak could kill 1,000 people as virus spreads to 17 states | Virology News | Scoop.it
At least 63 people reported dead out of 212 cases recorded since virus outbreak started in August 2015.
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Yoruba genetically immune to Lassa fever virus?

Yoruba genetically immune to Lassa fever virus? | Virology News | Scoop.it
A university lecturer, Prof. Christian Happi, has claimed that Yoruba people, by the make-up of their genes, are immune to Lassa virus that causes Lassa fev
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I'm getting sick of Zika....

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