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Child critical in Brisbane hospital with bat virus

Child critical in Brisbane hospital with bat virus | Virology News | Scoop.it

An eight-year-old boy is critically ill in a Brisbane hospital with the Australian bat lyssavirus...The child was bitten or scratched by a bat two months ago prior to becoming ill in north Queensland, then three weeks ago the child became ill.


Rabies virus graphic courtesy of Russell Kightley Media

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Interesting how the virus is "closely related" to rabies, but is called something as innocuos as "Australian bat lyssavirus".  Because of course, Australia has no rabies.

 

 

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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Scientists Exploit HIV's Sweet Tooth to Stop the Virus in its Tracks

Scientists Exploit HIV's Sweet Tooth to Stop the Virus in its Tracks | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scientists are consistently coming up with new ways that we might be able to beat serious illnesses like HIV, and novel new approach sees researchers attempting to starve the virus of sugar.
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Crystallising the tobacco mosaic virus

Crystallising the tobacco mosaic virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
We saw last week how sulphur dioxide released from the Laki fissure system accounted for many deaths due to poisoning. We will stay with poisons this week as well, for virus has its roots in the Latin term for “poison”
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Nice article - and from a newspaper in India, no less!  Adds to the history of virology in a very accessible way.

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Health Check: when are we most likely to catch viral diseases?

Health Check: when are we most likely to catch viral diseases? | Virology News | Scoop.it
Viruses cause all kinds of infections from relatively mild cases of the flu to deadly outbreaks of Ebola. Clearly, not all viruses are equal and one of these differences is when you can infect others.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Great article!

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Suspected Congo Ebola victims test negative for the virus

Suspected Congo Ebola victims test negative for the virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
Six hunters in the Democratic Republic of Congo who fell sick and were suspected to have Ebola have tested negative for the virus, the health minister said on Saturday. The government and World Health Organization investigated a possible outbreak about 270 km (170 miles) northeast of the capital when the hunters developed Ebola-like symptoms after eating an antelope that appeared to be sick when they killed it. "All of the samples are negative ... There is not an Ebola epidemic," Health Minister
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First Measles Death in US Since 2003

First Measles Death in US Since 2003 | Virology News | Scoop.it
Shocking news today out of Washington state: For the first time since 2003, a resident of the United States has died of measles. If you wondered, based on my last post, what happens when measles infects unvaccinated people and travels with them in an untrackable manner, this is the answer: It sickens and kills people who are vulnerable for reasons over which they have no control.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Shocking - and avoidable.  GET YOUR KIDS VACCINATED!!

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Superbug threat prompts West to revisit Soviet-era virus therapy

Superbug threat prompts West to revisit Soviet-era virus therapy | Virology News | Scoop.it
Alarmed by rising resistance to antibiotics scientists and governments are taking a fresh look at bacteria-chomping viruses first isolated a century ago from the stools of patients recovering from
Ed Rybicki's insight:

So nearly 100 years after Felix d'Herelle started championing phage therapy, the West is finally taking notice?  I't actually way past time that they were taken seriously: the Eliava Institute in Georgia has nearly that long a history (d'Herelle influenced the founder to start their enormous collection of phages) of successful treatment of bacterial infections, but westerners have stayed wedded to increasingly ineffective antibiotics for the last 70-something years.

I know what I might work on in my old age....

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Two new Ebola cases in Liberia, seven weeks after country declared virus-free

Two new Ebola cases in Liberia, seven weeks after country declared virus-free | Virology News | Scoop.it
Hours after Liberia reports its first Ebola death since 9 May, two more people test positive for the disease. An urgent contact tracing operation is under way
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Sad!

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My Doctor Told Me I Should Vaccinate My Children, But Then Someone Much Louder Than My Doctor Told Me I Shouldn’t

My Doctor Told Me I Should Vaccinate My Children, But Then Someone Much Louder Than My Doctor Told Me I Shouldn’t | Virology News | Scoop.it
I’ve decided to not vaccinate my children, at least until a louder voice comes around. I’m all ears.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Seriously. Stupid.  REALLY!!??

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Fear The Walking Dead trailer teases us with 'virus' talk

Fear The Walking Dead trailer teases us with 'virus' talk | Virology News | Scoop.it
AMC releases two more teasers for Vancouver-shot zombie show
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Because zombies??

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New antibody treatment may protect against Marburg and Ebola viruses

New antibody treatment may protect against Marburg and Ebola viruses | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scripps researchers have designed proteins that elicit an effective antibody response in a mouse model against Marburg virus and its viral cousin, Ebola virus.
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Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water

Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water | Virology News | Scoop.it

Nearly 25% of the global population (1.8 billion people in 2012) is consuming fecally-contaminated water [1]. This water can contain bacteria, protozoa, and viruses that can cause a variety of diseases in humans, most notably gastroenteritis. The impact on public health is staggering. Unsafe water, inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene are responsible for about 90% of diarrheal deaths worldwide [2]. Not surprisingly, diarrhea is the second leading cause of death for children under the age of five globally (1.2 million deaths in 2012) [2]. In addition to the human cost, the World Bank estimates that lack of access to safe water and sanitation results in a global economic loss of US$260 billion annually [3].

 

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Great review!

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Papillomavirus Research

The official Journal of the International Papillomavirus SocietyPapillomavirus Research (PVR), the Journal of HPV and other Small DNA Tumor Viruses ...
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Dinosaur eggs get ready to hatch their secrets – 200 million years later

Dinosaur eggs get ready to hatch their secrets – 200 million years later | Virology News | Scoop.it
The secrets of the embryonic dinosaurs whose parents roamed South Africa 200 million years ago are finally in the process of being hatched.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

"Other" - as in, not viruses.  But it'd be SO cool if we could look for some...B-)

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The History of Vaccines — Download

Download Here: http://tinyurl.com/nuhgype The History of Vaccines describes the compelling history of vaccination, from early smallpox immunization practices, ...
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Cat owners in Cape Town warned of deadly virus

Cat owners in Cape Town warned of deadly virus | Virology News | Scoop.it

Cape Town - At least 24 kittens in the south Peninsula have died in the past two months from a virus that is so deadly it can kill an animal within hours.

The panleukopaenia virus, also known as feline parvovirus, is highly contagious and extremely resilient. Unless killed off with disinfectant, the virus can remain in an area for two years.

There is no specific treatment available.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

And on a local note....vaccinate!!

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Bird flu threat escalates as virus mutates

Bird flu threat escalates as virus mutates | Virology News | Scoop.it
Controlling avian influenza, both locally and globally, is becoming increasingly difficult, with the virus keeping one step ahead of scientific understanding.
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Foreigner in Philippines tests positive for MERS virus

Foreigner in Philippines tests positive for MERS virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
A 36-year-old foreigner who arrived in the Philippines from the Middle East is under quarantine after testing positive for the MERS virus, health officials said Monday.
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The Norovirus: A Study in Puked [and other] Perfection

The Norovirus: A Study in Puked [and other] Perfection | Virology News | Scoop.it
Today, The Guardian relayed one of those stunning medical stories that causes me to clean off my glasses and take another look to make sure I'm reading it clearly. They report that an outbreak of n...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Amazing - a couple of years on, and this post is STILL getting comments!  I think I said at the time, this'll just run, and run, and run...B-)

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Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus

Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
Flu vaccines can be something of a shot in the dark. Not only must they be given yearly, there's no guarantee the strains against which they protect will be the ones circulating once the season arrives. New research by Rockefeller University scientists and their colleagues suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

So: antibody-antigen complexes work better than antigen alone - and sialylation of the antibody is important.  Vaccinology really is entering the 21st century!

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New HIV vaccine completely protected against virus in half of monkeys

New HIV vaccine completely protected against virus in half of monkeys | Virology News | Scoop.it
Positive results of trials in monkeys triggered the pharmaceutical company to begin trials in humans, according to researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

"Monkeys aren't men - and mice lie".  But it's still promising...B-)

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High-res image of Ebola virus reveals how it evades the immune system

High-res image of Ebola virus reveals how it evades the immune system | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scripps researchers have created a high-resolution image of the Ebola virus, which has revealed how a viral protein helps the virus escape attack from the immune system.
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Only a cure or death will reveal Virus’s identity

Only a cure or death will reveal Virus’s identity | Virology News | Scoop.it
Meet “Virus”‚ Tshwane’s own mystery man who has sacrificed his identity for over a decade‚ giving HIV/Aids a taste of its own medicine: Mystery.
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First recorded case of Ebola since Liberia was declared virus free

First recorded case of Ebola since Liberia was declared virus free | Virology News | Scoop.it
Liberian deputy health minister Tolbert Nyenswah says ‘there is no need to panic’
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Potential additional benefit of a nine-valent second generation HPV vaccine

Introduction

A second generation HPV vaccine has been developed for the prevention of anogenital cancers and precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus and of genital warts due to nine HPV types.

We estimated the annual burden of these diseases attributable to the nine HPV types compared to HPV types from first generation vaccines in women and men in Europe.

Material and methods

Incidence rates from the IARC database, cancer registries, the literature and Eurostat population data were used.

The burden attributable to the HPV types targeted by both vaccines was estimated by applying the relative contribution of the respective HPV types from epidemiological studies.

Results

In 2013, the number of new anogenital HPV-attributable cancers was 44,480 with 39,494 of these cases related to second vs. 33,285 to first generation vaccine types.

Among the 284,373 to 541,621 new HPV-attributable anogenital precancerous lesions 235,364–448,423 and 135,025–256,830 were estimated to be related to second and first generation vaccine types, respectively.

The annual number of new genital warts was 753,608–935,318, with 90% related to HPV6/11.

Conclusions

These data demonstrate how the large public health impact that was achieved by the first generation HPV vaccines could be further increased by second generation vaccines.

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Plant virus replication and movement

Plant virus replication and movement | Virology News | Scoop.it
Because plant cells are not identical to animal cells, plant viruses are significantly different from animal viruses in several ways.
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