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WHO | Novel coronavirus infection – update

WHO | Novel coronavirus infection – update | Virology News | Scoop.it
The United Kingdom (UK) has informed WHO of another confirmed case of infection with the novel coronavirus (NCoV). The patient is a UK resident and a relative of the case announced on 11 February 2013.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

This looks like person-to-person transmission; they also say the new case is a person who has "pre-existing medical conditions that may have increased susceptibility to respiratory infections".  So: like SARS, a nasty disease that can be transmitted between humans.  Let's hope it goes no further!  Thanks @cupton1!

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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Retroviral influence on human embryonic development

Retroviral influence on human embryonic development | Virology News | Scoop.it
Some of the thousands of human endogenous retroviral genomes are activated during human embryogenesis, suggesting that they may play a role in development.
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What You Need to Know About the Current [US] Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Outbreaks

What you need to know about the current highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks http://t.co/IOdaL2hxTZ
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Here's Why You Should Get the HPV Vaccine, Even if You've Already Had HPV

Here's Why You Should Get the HPV Vaccine, Even if You've Already Had HPV | Virology News | Scoop.it
Plus, even if you've had the shot, you could probably use a booster.
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Integration of multiple repeats of geminiviral DNA into the nuclear genome of tobacco during evolution.

Integration of multiple repeats of geminiviral DNA into the nuclear genome of tobacco during evolution. | Virology News | Scoop.it
Integration of viral DNA into the host nuclear genome, although not unusual in bacterial and animal systems, has surprisingly not been reported for plants.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

An oldie but a goodie: pretty much ignored, because it predated whole-genome sequencing of plants, but an interesting window onto how viruses can get into host genomes and affect their evolution.

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HPV | Home | Human Papillomavirus | CDC

HPV | Home | Human Papillomavirus | CDC | Virology News | Scoop.it
Human papillomavirus (pap-ah-LO-mah-VYE-rus)(HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States.
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Possible new HIV therapies, and the potential for a cure

Possible new HIV therapies, and the potential for a cure | Virology News | Scoop.it
HIV is currently treatable, but not curable. New research, combined with existing techniques, could change that in the future.
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Modified HIV Cures Rare Genetic Disorder In Children

Modified HIV Cures Rare Genetic Disorder In Children | Virology News | Scoop.it
HIV may still be on a global rampage, but at least scientists are attempting to make good out of a bad situation.
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Call it a lentivirus-derived vector, rather??

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Panel recommends influenza vaccination for pregnant women

Panel recommends influenza vaccination for pregnant women | Virology News | Scoop.it
An expert panel has recommended immunisation of women against influenza during pregnancy to protect mothers and their babies from serious health complications.
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Positivity - Living With HIV in South Africa

Positivity - Living With HIV in South Africa | Virology News | Scoop.it
@JoeEde Help spread hope by sharing the stories of ppl who are living normal lives w/ #HIV, RETWEET! http://t.co/5Ge0vWx1DH & follow us pls!
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Bird Flu Takes Biggest Toll Yet as Virus Hits US Chicken Farms

Bird Flu Takes Biggest Toll Yet as Virus Hits US Chicken Farms | Virology News | Scoop.it
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Poultry producers and scientists have been hoping warmer weather would knock down a virulent strain of bird flu that has hammered the Midwest, but the virus recently took its biggest toll yet, hitting a farm in Iowa that held...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Possibly not bigger than what happened in China and Hong Kong....

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Preparing for Ebola, but Stopping Lassa Fever

Last fall, with the Ebola epidemic raging, the small nation of Benin, a few countries away from the outbreak zone, experienced a cluster of unexplained deaths.

In mid-October, a 12-day-old baby was taken to a hospital in Tanguiéta, in northwest Benin, and died two days later. By early November, three employees of the hospital, St. Jean de Dieu, were dead too.

Ultimately, 16 people fell ill and nine died, including a prominent pediatrician. Ebola was suspected because of symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea. But in mid-November, lab tests were negative for the virus.

“There was a lot of panic,” Catherine Smallwood, a technical officer with the World Health Organization, said. “They didn’t know what it was.” W.H.O. described the incident recently in a report on its website.

 The day the Ebola tests came back negative, Dr. Smallwood and a W.H.O.-led team happened to arrive in Benin, part of an effort to help 14 vulnerable African countries prepare for a possible Ebola outbreak. The team suggested that the samples be tested for Lassa fever, a related virus that had never been seen in Benin.

The Lassa tests were positive.

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Rabies Deaths Higher Than Previously Thought

Rabies Deaths Higher Than Previously Thought | Virology News | Scoop.it
Ninety-nine percent of human deaths are caused by dog bites, with India having the most rabies deaths — almost 21,000 a year.

 

Rabies kills 59,000 people a year, or about 160 a day — more than had previously been assumed — according to a study published last week.

The report, based on mathematical modeling, is higher than previous estimates based on officially reported deaths, the authors said. It was produced by the Global Alliance for Rabies Control and published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Although India has the most rabies deaths — almost 21,000 a year — many African countries have higher per capita death rates. China also has a high death rate from rabies.

Although all mammalian animals can get rabies, 99 percent of human deaths from rabies are caused by dog bites.

 

Rabies virus graphic from Russell Kightley Media

Ed Rybicki's insight:

And if Ebola doesn't get you, rabies might.

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Disease Detection Gets A Boost With Plans For A CDC In Africa

Disease Detection Gets A Boost With Plans For A CDC In Africa | Virology News | Scoop.it
African health officials are partnering with the U.S. to build a continentwide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal is a more rapid response to health emergencies, such as Ebola.

 

In 1946, a malaria outbreak across the Southern U.S. catalyzed the formation of what would eventually become the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Then in 2002, China's CDC began its operations just as an outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, took hold.

 

Now, as the worst Ebola outbreak in history winds down, African health officials announced Monday they will partner with the U.S. to establish a continentwide African CDC.

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World's first malaria vaccine moves closer to use in Africa

World's first malaria vaccine moves closer to use in Africa | Virology News | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - The world's first malaria vaccine, made by GlaxoSmithKline, could be approved by international regulators for use in Africa from October after final trial data showed it offered partial...
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Why my kids get the HPV vaccine: A cervical cancer survivor’s story

As a cervical cancer survivor and parent to two sons, Linda Ryan advises other parents to vaccinate their kids against the human papillomavirus (HPV).
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HPV in focus: the case for vaccinating boys as well as girls

HPV in focus: the case for vaccinating boys as well as girls | Virology News | Scoop.it
The BDA is supporting European Immunization Week, from 20-25 April and using it to highlight the need for HPV vaccinations to be extended to boys in the UK. European Immunization Week (EIW) is run ...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

...because then you have ANOTHER barrier to spread.

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Deadly strain of dog flu sweeping through the Midwest US

Deadly strain of dog flu sweeping through the Midwest US | Virology News | Scoop.it
A deadly new strain of dog flu is sweeping through the Midwest.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Plant-made vaccine, anyone...?

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Can a common cold virus lead to asthma? - Futurity

Can a common cold virus lead to asthma? - Futurity | Virology News | Scoop.it
New research seems to confirm what scientists have suspected: viruses that cause common colds may play a critical role in asthma and chronic lung disease.
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With bird flu spreading [in US], USDA starts on potential vaccine

With bird flu spreading [in US], USDA starts on potential vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is working on a vaccine to counter a deadly strain of bird flu, as losses to poultry producers mount.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Well, of course they would - these are American chickens, after all....

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The Archivist Files: How LA handled the 1918 flu pandemic

The Archivist Files: How LA handled the 1918 flu pandemic | Virology News | Scoop.it
The city imposed a quarantine of schools, theaters and other public gatherings. Poolrooms were closed and public funerals were banned. Factory schedules were staggered to prevent crowding on streetcars.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Great addition to the history of virology!

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Deadly Bird Flu Flew Over [to US] From Asia, Experts Say

Deadly Bird Flu Flew Over [to US] From Asia, Experts Say | Virology News | Scoop.it
The H5N2 virus that's spreading among poultry is a new mutant, probably descended from a different virus called H5N8 that's been plaguing poultry production ...
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Another study finds no link between MMR vaccine and autism

Another study finds no link between MMR vaccine and autism | Virology News | Scoop.it
The vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella doesn't bring an increased risk of autism, according to a new study of more than 95,000 children.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Ho, hum...How many more times??

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A new look at plant viruses and their potential beneficial roles in crops

Twenty years ago most people (including many scientists) thought of bacteria solely as agents of disease, best treated with disinfectants and antibiotics. Today, most of us are aware that bacteria make up almost 90% of the cells in our bodies, and play a critical role in digestion and the immune response. In plants, bacteria also form important mutualistic relationships, providing nitrogen fixation, growth enhancement and defence against pathogens, and undoubtedly a host of other functions that have yet to be described. The stigma of bacteria has changed dramatically in recent decades, and most people are aware that we need our good microbes.

Although there have been recent efforts to characterize the plant microbiome with a focus on finding beneficial microbes, viruses generally have not been included in the beneficial microbe lists (Berg et al., 2014, and references cited therein). Recent work has indicated that they can also play important and beneficial roles in plants, especially in extreme environments in which they are involved in conferring tolerance to drought, cold and hot soil temperatures (Roossinck, 2011). Beneficial viruses are defined for the purposes of this discussion as viruses that provide a trait to crop plants that increases their value or growth potential, or decreases the need for the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

 
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Egypt’s Avian Flu Surge Lacks an Explanation

Egypt’s Avian Flu Surge Lacks an Explanation | Virology News | Scoop.it
Cases of H5N1 have inexplicably increased, and a study of genetic sequences in victims shows some mutations that may make humans more susceptible.

 

Cases of H5N1 avian flu have been surging in Egypt since the fall. Egypt has now passed Indonesia as the country with the most human cases in total since the virus was first found in Hong Kong almost 20 years ago.

About a third of the 336 cases Egypt has reported to theWorld Health Organization since 2006 have been fatal. H5N1 avian flu still has killed more people in Indonesia.

Despite the sudden unexplained increase — Egypt has officially reported 125 cases since January — the World Health Organization said the country’s “current risk status” has not changed.

Nearly all cases still appear to involve contact with poultry; the disease has long been endemic in birds throughout Egypt, where many households have small poultry flocks. Transmission from birds to humans continues to be sporadic, the W.H.O. said.

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Ebola Lying in Wait

Ebola Lying in Wait | Virology News | Scoop.it
The virus may have been in West Africa for years, or decades, before last year’s outbreak.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Forget zombies: Ebola is out there, waiting for you....

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