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Aging cells lose their grip on DNA rogues | News | R&D Magazine

Aging cells lose their grip on DNA rogues | News | R&D Magazine | Virology News | Scoop.it
Transposable elements are mobile strands of DNA that insert themselves into chromosomes with mostly harmful consequences.

Cells have evolved ways to defend themselves, but in a new study, Brown University researchers describe how cells lose this ability as they age, possibly resulting in a decline in their function and health.

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Yet ANOTHER reason not to get old...B-(

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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people. And other things.
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Ebola Resource Center

Ebola Resource Center | Virology News | Scoop.it
Ebola articles - from BioMed Central and Springer
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A valuable (and FREE!) resource!

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Ebola’s Mystery: One Boy Lives, Another Dies

Ebola’s Mystery: One Boy Lives, Another Dies | Virology News | Scoop.it
Over and over, doctors have been confounded by the divergent paths of Ebola patients whose cases appeared similar at first.
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HIV Handbook: facts, figures, and vaccines

HIV Handbook: facts, figures, and vaccines | Virology News | Scoop.it

The 1st of December marked World AIDS Day 2014, and saw millions of people from across the world pledging support for the eradication of HIV and the proper treatment of AIDS patients. Eradication remains the ultimate goal, and vaccines are almost certainly the tool for the job. But researchers have for decades struggled to tame a virus with so many defence mechanisms. With high profile disappointments, such as the Thai Trial, confidence waned in HIV vaccine candidates. But slowly different parts of the virus are being cracked by teams across the globe, and the Thai Trial’s ALVAC and AIDSVAX combo may even be making a comeback.

 
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Updated – Viruses Resources on Ebola Virus and other Filoviruses

Updated – Viruses Resources on Ebola Virus and other Filoviruses | Virology News | Scoop.it
Updated on 28 November 2014   

Given the current dramatic evolution of the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, Dr. Jens H. Kuhn from the NIH/NIAID/IRF-Frederick has kindly compiled the following list of resources related to the Ebola virus and other filoviruses that were published in the journal Virusesand are hence openly available. We will update the list as new papers on the subject are published.

 

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What a useful resource!

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Slowdown in new Ebola cases offers a chance for control efforts to get ahead of the epidemic

An apparent slowdown in new cases of Ebola disease in Liberia and Guinea should be taken advantage of. Almost one year after an Ebola epidemic began in West Africa there are at last encouraging signs that it may be receding in some regions. But those responding to the epidemic must not drop their guard — rather, they should seize upon the chance to finish the job.

 
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Why Southern Africa may be the best place on Earth for health science research

Why Southern Africa may be the best place on Earth for health science research | Virology News | Scoop.it
Genetic advantage: why Southern Africa may be the best place on Earth for health science research
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FDA Grants Fast Track Designation to RSV F-Protein Nanoparticle Vaccine

FDA Grants Fast Track Designation to RSV F-Protein Nanoparticle Vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it
Novavax, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of recombinant nanoparticle vaccines and adjuvants, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track Designation to Novavax’ RSV F-Protein nanoparticle vaccine candidate (RSV F vaccine) for protection of infants via maternal immunization.
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Ebola: experiences at the frontline

Ebola: experiences at the frontline | Virology News | Scoop.it

"There is a lot of talk but not enough action in the global response to containing the disease in West Africa. We need rational responses and not those fuelled by panic," says Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor Gem Patten.

 Folk from UCT sharing their experiences on Ebola.
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Peculiarities of Prion Diseases

Peculiarities of Prion Diseases | Virology News | Scoop.it
Prion diseases (PrDs) are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative diseases naturally occurring in humans and animals, “mad cow” disease being the most infamous. Their development and propagation requires endogenous prion protein (PrP) and derives from the conversion of PrP to a misfolded form, which combines with other misfolded PrP molecules to form small nuclei (seeds). The seeds can then result in an exponential increase in additional misfolded PrP molecules, eventually accumulating into large aggregates. However, the physiological roles of normal and misfolded PrP, mechanisms of the conformational transition, and the associated nature of the infectious and neurotoxic agents still remain enigmatic. In this review, we address five questions regarding PrDs that we are frequently asked by laypeople and scientists new to the field.
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Now HERE'S a useful review!

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Scientists find promise in ‘back boost’ study for future flu vaccine

Scientists find promise in ‘back boost’ study for future flu vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it

Developing a seasonal flu vaccine has long challenged scientists, as predicting the strain that will impact the public in any given year involves an educated guessing game. The flu, like the Ebola virus, is comprised of RNA, not DNA, genes. These viruses’ distinct genetic makeup enables them to mutate and evolve efficiently— sometimes long after a vaccination has been developed and distributed, leaving even the vaccinated public vulnerable to infection.

But U.K. researchers have discovered a potential solution to this problem: considering an individual’s antibody response to develop a stronger flu vaccine.

 
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Fewer Ebola Cases Go Unreported Than Thought, Study Finds

Fewer Ebola Cases Go Unreported Than Thought, Study Finds | Virology News | Scoop.it
Transmission of the Ebola virus occurs mostly within families, in hospitals and at funerals, not randomly like the flu, Yale scientists said.
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FDA approves Gardasil 9 for prevention of cancers caused by five additional types of HPV

FDA approves Gardasil 9 for prevention of cancers caused by five additional types of HPV | Virology News | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Gardasil 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) for the prevention of certain diseases caused by nine types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Covering nine HPV types, five more HPV types than Gardasil (previously approved by the FDA), Gardasil 9 has the potential to prevent approximately 90 percent of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers.

 

Thanks to Russell Kightley Media for the cervical cancer graphic

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Hybrid Delivery System Boosts DNA Vaccines Potential

Hybrid Delivery System Boosts DNA Vaccines Potential | Virology News | Scoop.it

Scientists from the University at Buffalo have created a novel hybrid system designed to deliver genetic antigens and elicit a strong immune response in patients, something DNA vaccines have so far failed to deliver. The hybrid, presented in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science and described as a “hybrid biosynthetic gene therapy vector development and dual engineering capacity,” brings together two usually distinct technologies to create a hybrid vector: combining a bacterial cell and a synthetic polymer. The result was an immune response greater than both the individual technologies were able to produce in mouse models because of the new technology’s ability to deliver the DNA to antigen-presenting cells.

 
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Nature makes all articles free to view

Nature makes all articles free to view | Virology News | Scoop.it
Publisher permits subscribers and media to share read-only versions of its papers.
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Score 1 for the Open brigade!

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US Ebola vaccine trial reports positive results

US Ebola vaccine trial reports positive results | Virology News | Scoop.it
A related vaccine is due to be tested in West Africa in 2015.

An experimental vaccine against Ebola virus seems to be safe and commands a strong immune response against the virus, according to tests in 20 healthy people in the United States. The results of the phase 1 trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine1.

“All in all, I would say it was a successful phase 1 study,” says Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, which co-developed the drug with the London-based drug company GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). “The next steps are to move ahead with a larger efficacy trial in West Africa.”

 

The vaccine is similar to one that is on track to be tested in larger trials in West Africa, which are likely begin early next year. In these phase 2 and phase 3 trials, thousands of people who are at risk of contracting the virus, such as health workers, will receive the vaccine to determine whether it can protect against infection.

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A Top Ten list for economically important plant viruses

A Top Ten list for economically important plant viruses | Virology News | Scoop.it

The concept of “Top Ten” lists of plant pathogens is in vogue in recent years, and plant viruses are no exception. However, the only list available has more to do with historical and scientific worth than it has to do with economic impact on humans and their animals. This review will discuss the most important plant viruses that cause serious harm to food plants that sustain the bulk of humankind.

 
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I offered it to them over at Molecular Plant Pathology; I did...B-)

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Genetically engineered 'plantibodies' to halt Ebola

Genetically engineered 'plantibodies' to halt Ebola | Virology News | Scoop.it

While little can be done to curb the current outbreak of Ebola in Africa, when the next outbreak happens, the world will be armed with cheap but powerful biologics made using plants, says UCT plant biotechnologist Professor Ed Rybicki.


Recent news from the BBC is the World Health Organisation reporting that a serum made from the blood of Ebola survivors could be made available in Liberia within weeks.

Liberia has been hardest hit by Ebola deaths, followed by Guinea and Sierra Leone, and the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone will rise dramatically by January 2015.

The WHO's Dr Marie-Paule Kieny says trials for two promising vaccines could produce initial results by the end of the year.

Worldwide, governments have been on high alert to halt the spread of the disease, spotlighting the need for emergency vaccine technology: vaccines that can be made quickly, cheaply and safely.

And biologics - drugs that can be created by genetically re-engineering plants, or even plant viruses, to produce vaccines and antibodies needed to curb diseases such as Ebolavirus - could be the answer.

Biologics are not new, says Rybicki, a genetic engineer who heads up UCT's Biopharming Research Unit (BRU), but they are the latest growth area for pharmaceutical companies, and part of new approaches to disease prevention.

 

Ebola graphic from Russell Kightley Media

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Infographic: This is the future of vaccine technology

Infographic: This is the future of vaccine technology | Virology News | Scoop.it
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Merck enters the Ebola Vaccine Race

Merck enters the Ebola Vaccine Race | Virology News | Scoop.it

Merck has struck a agreement with NewLink Genetics to licence their investigationalEbola vaccine, rVSV-EBOV. The $50 million agreement gives Merck exclusive rights to develop, manufacture, and distribute the vaccine across the world.

This partnership should allow NewLink to keep pace with the huge effort by GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to developer their Ebola vaccine candidate.

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FINALLY, Big Pharma starts to jostle for position with Ebola vaccines. FINALLY!

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Taking More Than One Vaccine at a Time Doesn't Hurt!

Taking More Than One Vaccine at a Time Doesn't Hurt! | Virology News | Scoop.it
The specific antigens given in vaccines represent only a small portion of the daily stimuli the immune system has to deal with.
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ANYONE who has done some immunology could tell you that - but there are distressingly few of us...B-(

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Erik Carter's comment, November 21, 10:52 AM
However, while it's not dangerous to give multiple vaccines at once, it can prove detrimental to the development of a good immune response. I used to work in a viral immunology lab that looked at heterologous immunity as well as simultaneous infections. If you're interested, look into Liisa Selin's research as UMass Medical School. It's very interesting, and a lot of fun to do.
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Biologists discover HIV-like virus - in microbes in hot springs

Biologists discover HIV-like virus - in microbes in hot springs | Virology News | Scoop.it
It lives in volcanic hot springs, and studying it will give researchers a better understanding of how to treat the disease.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Yah, Sure. Sure it will...as my good wife, sitting here beside me says, "Why wouldn't you just study HIV? Or SIV? Or another lentivirus??"

Seriously: just like any breakthrough in crystallography of virus proteins "will lead to better vaccines!".

Maybe. If we're lucky.  Meanwhile, this is just another of Science By Hype.

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