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Aging cells lose their grip on DNA rogues | News | R&D Magazine

Aging cells lose their grip on DNA rogues | News | R&D Magazine | Virology News | Scoop.it
Transposable elements are mobile strands of DNA that insert themselves into chromosomes with mostly harmful consequences.

Cells have evolved ways to defend themselves, but in a new study, Brown University researchers describe how cells lose this ability as they age, possibly resulting in a decline in their function and health.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Yet ANOTHER reason not to get old...B-(

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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Benin: WHO’s medical detectives work with national health authorities to solve a mystery

Benin: WHO’s medical detectives work with national health authorities to solve a mystery | Virology News | Scoop.it
The Ebola preparedness team visits the traditional healer whose family lost several members to the Lassa fever outbreak in and around Tanguiéta.
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Nine people suspected dead of Lassa fever in Benin

Nine people suspected dead of Lassa fever in Benin | Virology News | Scoop.it
As the world ramps up its fight against the Zika virus, West Africa is battling to contain a growing outbreak of Lassa fever with nine people in Benin reported dead.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

There ARE other diseases....

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Honeybee virus spread by human activity

Honeybee virus spread by human activity | Virology News | Scoop.it
Deformed wing virus reduces the winter survival of European honeybees (Apis mellifera), and could be a factor in the large colony losses seen in some parts of the world. To find out how the virus became pandemic, Lena Wilfert at the University of Exeter, UK, and her colleagues analysed the virus's genome to reconstruct its evolutionary and geographical history.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I think human activity is pretty much to blame for nearly ALL outbreaks of infectious disease of recent times?

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Vaccines: The economic value of the public health tool

Vaccines: The economic value of the public health tool | Virology News | Scoop.it
Vaccinations, long recognized as an excellent investment that saves lives and prevents illness, could have significant economic value that far exceeds their original cost, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.
In what is believed to be among the first studies to examine the potential return on investment of vaccinations, the researchers assessed the economic benefits of vaccines in 94 low- and middle-income countries using projected vaccination rates from 2011 to 2020. When looking only at costs associated with illness, such as treatment costs and productivity losses, the return was $16 for every dollar spent on vaccines. In a separate analysis taking into account the broader economic impact of illness, vaccinations save $44 for every dollar spent.
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Central African Republic: No new cases of monkeypox

Central African Republic: No new cases of monkeypox | Virology News | Scoop.it

In a follow-up story on the monkeypox outbreak in the Central African Republic (CAR), health officials say that no new monkeypox cases have been reported in Bangassou, according to a Journal De Bangui report (computer translated).


Monkeypox/CDC

“All the patients we have received and which were isolated at the hospital here, are healed and have already returned to their families. So I can confirm that at this time, no cases of ill monkeypox virus is reported in Bangassou “, noted John Paul Ogbia.

The doctor spoke, however, a suspect case. John Paul Ogbia announced the arrival of a verification mission in Bakouma which is part of the disease , “the first two people who had presented this disease had come from Bakouma. We will organize a working mission in the coming days in this location to check the situation in the city “ he said.

 
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Nigeria battling fresh outbreak of the deadly Lassa fever

Nigeria battling fresh outbreak of the deadly Lassa fever | Virology News | Scoop.it
Nigeria is facing a growing outbreak of a deadly virus similar to Ebola which has already killed 101 people since August.
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Nigeria Contained Ebola; Can We Contain Lassa Fever and Zika Virus?

Nigeria Contained Ebola; Can We Contain Lassa Fever and Zika Virus? | Virology News | Scoop.it
On the 14th January 2016, the World Health Organisation declared an end of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Less than a day later, a new case in Sierra Leone was detected, indicating that the pat...
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Premium Scientific Pictures for ZIKA Virus

Premium Scientific Pictures for ZIKA Virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
Gallery: ZIKA Virus on Russell Kightley Premium Scientific Pictures
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I have no stake in this site B-)

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Buried Alive: Microbes from Ancient Halite

Buried Alive: Microbes from Ancient Halite | Virology News | Scoop.it
Halite is one of the most extreme environments to support life. From the drought of the Atacama Desert to salt deposits up to Permian in age and 2000 meters in burial depth, live microbes have been found. Because halite is geologically stable and impermeable to ground water, the microbes allegedly have a syndepositional origin, making them the oldest organisms known to live on Earth. Recently, our understanding of the microbial diversity inside halite has broadened, and the first genome sequences of ancient halite-buried microbes are now available. The secrets behind prolonged survival in salt are also starting to be revealed.
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Call for papers: The interplay between the host and HSV-1 infection

Call for papers: The interplay between the host and HSV-1 infection | Virology News | Scoop.it

Virology Journal is now inviting submissions for a new thematic series on “The interplay between the host and HSV-1 infection”. Edited by Chunfu Zheng (Soochow University, China), the collection welcomes research and review articles, and will also include specially commissioned topical reviews, written by leaders in the field.

Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a typical human-restricted pathogen, which is carried by 50-90% of the population worldwide, with higher frequencies in developing countries. HSV-1 is well known for its ability to establish a lifelong latent infection in neurons and trigger reactivation and lytic infection, mainly in epithelial or mucosal cells.

Although HSV-1 was identified over 100 years ago, the battle between HSV-1 and the host continues, as there is no vaccine yet available, and HSV-1 is still one of the major infectious diseases worldwide.

We will consider articles covering the interplay between the host and HSV-1 infection, including but not limited to:

Virus-host interactionCellular responses to viral infectionPathogenesis and immunity

The aim for this thematic series is to help us not only improve our knowledge of virus-host interactions but also develop novel antiviral approaches and vaccines against HSV-1 infection.

The deadline for submissions is April 30th 2016. To submit your manuscript, please use our online submission system, and indicate in your cover letter that you would like the manuscript to be considered for this thematic series. If you would like to enquire about the suitability of a manuscript for consideration, please email a pre-submission enquiry tovirologyjournal@biomedcentral.com. 

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Pandemic Trailer Pulls You Into the Zombie Outbreak

Pandemic Trailer Pulls You Into the Zombie Outbreak | Virology News | Scoop.it
Watch the new Pandemic trailer. The zombie thriller stars Rachel Nichols, Mekhi Phifer, Pat Healy, Alfie Allen, and Missi Pyle.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Because.  Zombies...B-)

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Production of Human papillomavirus pseudovirions in plants and their use in pseudovirion-based neutralisation assays in mammalian cells

Production of Human papillomavirus pseudovirions in plants and their use in pseudovirion-based neutralisation assays in mammalian cells | Virology News | Scoop.it
Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer and have recently also been implicated in mouth, laryngeal and anogenital cancers.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

...and it has occurred to us that it can be a DNA vaccine vector too...B-)

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UNICEF and WHO help fight Lassa Fever outbreak in Benin

UNICEF and WHO help fight Lassa Fever outbreak in Benin | Virology News | Scoop.it
COTONOU, Benin, 10 February 2016 – Alarmed by an outbreak of deadly Lassa Fever, UNICEF and World Health Organization officials in Benin are scaling up an emergency response to help prevent further spread of the disease.
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Cytomegalovirus causes microcephaly in babies, and it’s much wider spread than Zika

Cytomegalovirus causes microcephaly in babies, and it’s much wider spread than Zika | Virology News | Scoop.it
The potential link between the Zika virus and brain malformations in babies is terrifying pregnant women around the world. But even in places not hit by the virus, kids are at risk of being born with microcephaly, or a smaller-than-average brain. Many of those cases are caused by a virus you’ve probably never heard of:...
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Cape Verde: 7,000 Zika cases, No microcephaly

Cape Verde: 7,000 Zika cases, No microcephaly | Virology News | Scoop.it
Officials with the Cape Verde Ministry of Health (computer translated) are reporting 7,164 Zika virus cases since first being confirmed in the capital city of Praia last October, while at the same time reporting no occurrences of microcephaly.

Image/CDC
Health officials do however report a downward trajectory in cases in the country.
Most cases were recorded in Praia (4,837), followed by São Filipe, on Fogo Island (1230) and the island of Maio (501).
According to the ministry, the transmission of the virus is now specifically occurring on the islands of Santiago and Fogo, and for the second consecutive week, there were no cases in the Isle of May.
Local transmission cases have not been recorded on the islands of Santo Antao, Sao Nicolau, São Vicente, Sal and Brava.
Health authorities have no records of complications associated with the virus or cases of neurological disorder.
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Philippines reports more than 200,000 dengue cases in 2015

Philippines reports more than 200,000 dengue cases in 2015 | Virology News | Scoop.it

The “preliminary” final numbers are finally out and the Philippines saw an increase in dengue fever of nearly 65 percent in 2015 compared to the prior year. Through Dec. 31, the archipelago reported  200,415 suspected cases of dengue, including 598 deaths.

 
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Nigeria: Lassa fever outbreak could kill 1,000 people as virus spreads to 17 states

Nigeria: Lassa fever outbreak could kill 1,000 people as virus spreads to 17 states | Virology News | Scoop.it
At least 63 people reported dead out of 212 cases recorded since virus outbreak started in August 2015.
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Yoruba genetically immune to Lassa fever virus?

Yoruba genetically immune to Lassa fever virus? | Virology News | Scoop.it
A university lecturer, Prof. Christian Happi, has claimed that Yoruba people, by the make-up of their genes, are immune to Lassa virus that causes Lassa fev
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I'm getting sick of Zika....

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African leaders advocate locally developed Zika, Lassa virus vaccines

African leaders, including ministers of health, finance, and other line ministries from Nigeria and at least 50 other African countries are meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to discuss the potential of developing, manufacturing and implementing effective Zika virus and Lassa virus vaccines on the continent.
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Why Africa can't afford to have an outbreak of the Zika virus

Why Africa can't afford to have an outbreak of the Zika virus | Virology News | Scoop.it
With limited laboratory capacity and a lack of experts and funding, an outbreak of the Zika virus in Africa could be problematic.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Yeah...sure.  It could be Bad.

 

BUT: as South African epidemiologists have pointed out, it'll only be a problem IF the mosquito that transmits it elsewhere, comes here - because our local A aegypti doesn't have the same behaviour, and will vastly outnumber and possibly outcompete any import variety.

 

And it's endemic in tropical Africa - meaning many people are immune already.

 

So scaremongering about Zika in Africa is possibly a little irresponsible - unless it's being used as a stalking horse for an agenda for setting up continent-wide arbovirus surveillance, or spurring on efforts to set up an African CDC.  Which I would heartily endorse.

 

The stuff about lack of reagents is spot-on: which is why we have a proposal in the works to provide just such, using plants to it.  Watch this space....

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8A Luiza 's curator insight, Today, 10:31 AM

From 2014 to the end of 2015, some countries of Africa had faced a horrible outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever that killed too much people, leaving a shattered nation. Hunger, diseases, malnutrition and poverty are still found in a lot of parts of Africa. And now, how would an unprepared nation face another outbreak, a disease called Zika fever, that can dramatically affect the African continent?

 

According to the article, the Zika fever is a mosquito - borne viral disease caused by the zika virus which is suspected of leading to the birth of deformed babies, it is transmitted to humans when an infected Aides mosquito stings a person. Direct human to human transmission through sex has also been reported.

 

Nowadays, Africa is passing a very difficult moment, still have too much poverty in some countries of Africa, thus giving input to a lot kinds of diseases because unlike US, there is not an unified body of health experts on the continent, and no money to have all the necessary infrastructural and human capacity to diagnose Zika. It seems like a far reality of all of us, but this is OUR planet, we are all humans, and we need to find a solution for this huge problem. How can we spent so much money in many futile things, while we look to some parts of Africa and people are starring, dying from diseases that could be treated with simple remedies, but they do not have enough money to basic things.  The zika outbreak had already arrived in Brazil in a frightening amount and it will be in Africa not too late (if we consider the easy retention of diseases in places where hygiene and basic sanitation are precarious). How will the continent deal with it?

 

By Luiza - 8A

 

8B Claudia's curator insight, Today, 10:44 PM

This article from  "theconversation.com" adresses why Africa can't afford to have an outbreak of the Zika Virus. The Zika Virus is a mosquito-borne virus that has spread to 23 countries. It affected Brasil the worst, affecting 3700 people. People get the virus when an infected Aedes mosquito bites them which leads to symptoms, one which being suspected, deformed babies. Although many diseases and viruses attack Africa, this one they weren't prepared for. Some of the reasons are lack of experts, limited lab capacity, and no unified body. With the lack of experts, its harder to treat people and guide them what to do. Also, the laboratory capacity to test for the virus is limited so if somebody gets affected, they won't be able to know. The virus continues to spread however it will be hard to settle due to the lack of resources.


This article taught me more about the diseases/viruses that affect countries in Africa and how they are struggling with this outbreak. Since diseases/viruses hit Africa quite often, I'm surprised that they have a lack of many resources. Although it isn't deadly, I still hope they find a cure and are able to get more resources for when something like this happens again.


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Human evolution is more a muddy delta than a branching tree

Until recently, anthropologists drew the human family tree in the same way that my 10-year-old son solves a maze. He finds it much easier to work from the end to the beginning, because blind alleys lead with depressing sameness away from the start...
Ed Rybicki's insight:

We all of us, brothers and sisters...even you Denisovans!

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Mobile DNA Sequencing in the Ebola Epidemic

Mobile DNA Sequencing in the Ebola Epidemic | Virology News | Scoop.it

February 3, 2016 | Just over a year ago, Bio-IT World spoke to microbiologist Nick Loman about the recently released MinION DNA sequencer. The three-inch-long device, made by Oxford Nanopore Technologies of the UK, can read DNA in real time on a laptop, and Loman’s lab at the University of Birmingham was one of the first to receive one. Like many other early adopters we spoke to at the time, Loman was itching to try the MinION in real-world clinical contexts, following the genetic traces of an infection as it develops.

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Computer-designed protein protects against flu in mice

Computer-designed protein protects against flu in mice | Virology News | Scoop.it
A small protein molecule, engineered through computer design, protects against diverse strains of influenza in mice. Its preventive and therapeutic power does not depend on the animals’ own immune response to viral infection. 
These findings, from a multi-institutional study led by UW Medicine researchers in Seattle, are reported Feb. 4 in PLOS Pathogens. 
The researchers are trying to address the public health need for better methods to keep flu at bay. Vaccinations can deter flu infections, but they are strain-specific. Flu viruses are notorious for forming new genetic subtypes that can evade vaccines and acquire resistance to antiviral medications.
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Zika virus: Q&A with Sanofi executive developing a vaccine

Zika virus: Q&A with Sanofi executive developing a vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it
Nicholas Jackson talks about Sanofi-Pasteur's efforts at developing a live vaccine against Zika virus. 
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