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Rwanda: HIV Infection At 51 Percent Among Sex Workers (Page 1 of 2)

Rwanda: HIV Infection At 51 Percent Among Sex Workers (Page 1 of 2) | Virology News | Scoop.it
At least 51 percent of sex workers in Rwanda are infected with HIV, according to the latest report by the Rwanda Biomedical Centre (RBC).

The research was carried out in all provinces of the country at the different sex workers' hot spots, according to Dr Sabin Nsanzimana, the coordinator of HIV and STIs Care and Treatment department.

The research was the first of its kind conducted by Rwanda Biomedical Centre, according to Dr Nsanzimana.

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Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people. And other things.
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How To Make A HIV Vaccine - maybe!

How To Make A HIV Vaccine - maybe! | Virology News | Scoop.it

This week marked 30 years since the public announcement that the cause of AIDS had been discovered. But how close are we to defeating HIV? And what sort of vaccine will help us to do this? Well there are a number of different approaches to the creation of a HIV vaccine, some of which look to stop patients from contracting HIV when exposed to the virus, others are looking for a therapeutic vaccine that will act at the very least as a functional cure for HIV+ patients.

Here are some of the different techniques being employed in the development of a HIV vaccine and some of the vaccines that have come out of them.

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Icelandic Penis Museum Documentary

Icelandic Penis Museum Documentary | Virology News | Scoop.it

A documentary about the Icelandic Penis Museum will be released in the USA next week. The movie is called The Final Member. Watch the trailer below!

The documentary is directed by two Canadians, Jonah Bekhor and Zach Math - who stayed in Iceland for a while to make the movie. The movie was actually shown in RIFF (Reykjavík Internaitonal Film Festival) last year but film distribution company, Drafthouse, bought all rights to the movie in North America. 

The movie tells the story of Sigurður Hjartarson, the founder of the Icelandic Phallological Museum - and his search for the final member for the museum, the human penis. The movie also follows the two men who wanted to donate their penises to the museum, Icelandic Páll Arason and American Tom who named his penis Elmo.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Viruses.  And other things.

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Researchers Discover New Target for Dengue Virus Vaccine

Researchers Discover New Target for Dengue Virus Vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it
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Creating a vaccine that protects people from all four types of dengue virus has frustrated scientists for decades. But researchers at the University of North Carolina have discovered a new target for human antibodies that could hold the key to a vaccine for the world’s most widespread mosquito-borne disease: dengue virus.

Using an experimental technique new to the dengue field, the labs of Ralph Baric, PhD, and Aravinda de Silva, PhD, showed that a molecular hinge where two regions of a protein connect is where natural human antibodies attach to dengue 3 to disable it. The finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that after primary infection most human antibodies that neutralize the virus bind to the hinge region....

Also, de Silva and Baric’s research could be translated into other fields in need of vaccines. “The general idea is that a complex protein-interaction site can now be moved from one virus to another,” de Silva said. For instance, an epitope from a virus like hepatitis C could be moved onto the live virus used in the measles vaccine. This new chimeric virus would simultaneously offer people protection against hepatitis C and measles. 

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Researchers develop method to deliver vaccines directly to lymph nodes - Vaccine Nation : Vaccine Nation

Researchers develop method to deliver vaccines directly to lymph nodes - Vaccine Nation : Vaccine Nation | Virology News | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a system for precisely delivering anti-inflammatory drugs to immune cells gone out of control, while sparing their well-behaved counterparts. Their findings were published online Feb. 23 in Nature Nanotechnology.

The system uses nanoparticles made of tiny bits of protein designed to bind to unique receptors found only on neutrophils, a type of immune cell engaged in detrimental acute and chronic inflammatory responses.

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Iceland – a hotbed for bird flu viruses

Iceland – a hotbed for bird flu viruses | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scientists at the University of Iceland, in collaboration with American and Icelandic colleagues, demonstrated that bird flu viruses from both continental Europe and North-America, as well as mixed virus strains are found in wild birds in Iceland.

Via Chris Upton + helpers
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Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women

Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women | Virology News | Scoop.it

 Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women

Each year around 2,000-2,500 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in England, the most common cancer in women under 35.

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Nasal Spray Holds Hope in Fighting Flu Epidemic

Nasal Spray Holds Hope in Fighting Flu Epidemic | Virology News | Scoop.it
Nasal Spray Holds Hope in Fighting Flu Epidemic
New York Times
Scottish and American scientists have found a new way to prevent flu infections that could, in theory, be used to fight an epidemic long before a vaccine is ready.
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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO | Virology News | Scoop.it
New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occur (Two shots of HPV...
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Deadly H5N1 Flu virus could 'spread around the globe' in just days

Deadly H5N1 Flu virus could 'spread around the globe' in just days | Virology News | Scoop.it

Japan has been forced into the 'emergency slaughter' of 112,000 chickens after confirming that the virus, last seen in the country three years ago, is back.

Urgent DNA tests were conducted after 200 birds suddenly died in just hours at a farm in Kumamoto, southwestern Japan.

Officials have now confirmed it IS the deadly H5 strain of the virus and could even be the SAME super-resistant H5N1 strain that spread around the world within days in 2005 and killed more than 600 people.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

OK, OK, I'm just doing this to show you how hard we work to protect you all from the Virus Apocalypse.

And zombies.

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Deadly Virus Surges Through Gulf States

Deadly Virus Surges Through Gulf States | Virology News | Scoop.it

Saudi Arabia says a deadly virus is rippling through the kingdom as additional cases were reported over the weekend in the United Arab Emirates and Yemen.

Confirmed cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have been seen at two major hospitals in the port city of Jeddah.

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Malaysian man is Asia's first casualty of deadly MERS virus

Malaysian man is Asia's first casualty of deadly MERS virus | Virology News | Scoop.it

A Malaysian man who went on a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia has become the first death in Asia from Middle East respiratory syndrome...

Malaysia’s health ministry said the man returned to Malaysia on March 29 and developed a high fever and cough and had difficulty breathing more than a week later. The man, a 54-year-old from southern Johor state, neighbouring Singapore, died Sunday in a hospital, it said Wednesday.

  
Ed Rybicki's insight:

And so it begins...NOT, hopefully!

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From 1988 to 2014, watch the battle to eradicate polio unfold

Red means the country still has cases of wild polio, yellow means the country is in a region that still has cases of wild polio, and white means that the disease has been eradicated. 

Thanks to CNN for this great GIF! Check out the whole story here: http://cnn.it/1h0Mu3K ;

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Pandemic Influenza: The Perpetual Challenge

Pandemic Influenza: The Perpetual Challenge | Virology News | Scoop.it

A video lecture by Anthony Fauci, Director of NIAID at the NIH.

 

Pandemic flu picture by Russell Kightley Media

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The day they discovered the AIDS virus

Thirty years ago, in a hasty and ill-timed press conference, health officials unveiled one of the most important discoveries in medical history.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

This is a timely and very even-handed recap of the history of the discovery of HIV - which I lived through as a young scientist and supervisor, avidly devouring any and all information we could get on the subject, little realising that South Africa would soon become the world's most infected country.

 

And still it goes on.

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Gardasil® 2-dose schedule approved in the EU for children aged from 9 to 13 years

Gardasil® 2-dose schedule approved in the EU for children aged from 9 to 13 years | Virology News | Scoop.it
April 3, 2014

Sanofi Pasteur MSD announced today that the European Commission has granted marketing authorisation for a 2-dose schedule at 0 and 6 months in children aged from 9 to 13 years for its quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Gardasil® is the only quadrivalent HPV vaccine and is indicated in adolescent girls and boys to help protect against cervical cancer, vulvar and vaginal precancers as well as genital warts.

“We are delighted to offer this alternative 2-dose schedule which could help to extend HPV vaccine coverage and increase uptake. It is based on data showing that 2 doses elicited an immune response in adolescents, comparable to that of 3 doses in young women, to the four HPV types – 6, 11, 16 and 18 – included in Gardasil®”, said Dr Fiona Thomas, UK Medical Director for Sanofi Pasteur MSD.

The approval of a Gardasil® vaccine 2-dose schedule follows the positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) granted in February, based on a Canadian study performed by Dobson et al. It demonstrated that the 2-dose 0, 6 month schedule in 9-13 year-old girls elicited an immune response comparable/non-inferior to that of 3 doses in the 16-26 year-old women, the population where quadrivalent vaccine efficacy has been shown. These results were sustained at 36 months of follow-up.

 

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Self-Administration of Flu Vaccine with a Patch May be Feasible

Self-Administration of Flu Vaccine with a Patch May be Feasible | Virology News | Scoop.it

The annual ritual of visiting a doctor’s office or health clinic to receive a flu shot may soon be outdated, thanks to the findings of a new study published in the journal Vaccine.

The research, which involved nearly 100 people recruited in the metropolitan Atlanta area, found that test subjects could successfully apply a prototype vaccine patch to themselves. That suggests the self-administration of vaccines with microneedle patches may one day be feasible, potentially reducing administration costs and relieving an annual burden on health care professionals.

The study also suggested that the use of vaccine patches might increase the rate at which the population is vaccinated against influenza. After comparing simulated vaccine administration using a patch and by conventional injection, the percentage of test subjects who said they’d be vaccinated grew from 46 percent to 65 percent.

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Researchers identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea

Researchers identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea | Virology News | Scoop.it
In a new article, researchers have published their initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic.

Via Ken Yaw Agyeman-Badu
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Cervical cancer vaccines: will our best hopes be realized?

Cervical cancer vaccines: will our best hopes be realized? | Virology News | Scoop.it
Guest contributor Vivien Tsu is director of PATH’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Project and associate director of our Reproductive Health Program.
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HPV test should replace Pap test as first screen for cervical cancer

HPV test should replace Pap test as first screen for cervical cancer | Virology News | Scoop.it
Toronto Star HPV test should replace Pap test as first screen for cervical cancer, experts say Toronto Star HPV testing should replace the Pap smear as the first screening procedure for cervical cancer for women over 30, recommends Cancer Care...
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Putin's aversion to the West is causing HIV/AIDS to explode in Russia

Putin's aversion to the West is causing HIV/AIDS to explode in Russia | Virology News | Scoop.it
New HIV infections in Russia are growing at alarming rates, while the Kremlin shows little interest in seriously addressing the country's HIV/AIDS problem.
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WHO: Ebola Death Toll Tops 120

WHO: Ebola Death Toll Tops 120 | Virology News | Scoop.it

The World Health Organization (WHO) says the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is up to at least 121.

WHO says health ministries in Guinea, Liberia and other affected countries have reported about 200 confirmed or suspected cases of the virus.

The vast majority of victims are in Guinea, where officials have reported 168 cases, including 108 deaths. Liberia reports 13 deaths from the disease.

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Is Ebola Virus in West Africa Getting Under Control?

Is Ebola Virus in West Africa Getting Under Control? | Virology News | Scoop.it

Health experts report that deaths from the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa are slowing, which is a sign that the latest outbreak of the deadly virus may finally be getting under control. The current outbreak has killed more than 120 people and, unlike previous outbreaks, has spread beyond the forested rural villages into a big city.

Guinea’s health ministry told the media that the number of new cases has fallen dramatically. Once they are sure there are no more new cases, the outbreak will be considered under control.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that the death toll from the 2014 Ebola outbreak is now 121 people in Guinea and Liberia. Officials in those two countries and other neighboring countries that may have been affected have reported approximately 200 patients confirmed or suspected to have the virus. However, that figure includes some cases from Mali, which the government there reported today turned out not to be Ebola. The vast majority of victims are in Guinea, where the current outbreak began. Officials have reported 168 cases in Guinea, including 108 deaths. Liberia has reported 13 deaths from the virus.

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Filipino male nurse tests positive for MERS virus in Philippines

Filipino male nurse tests positive for MERS virus in Philippines | Virology News | Scoop.it
A Filipino male nurse has been confirmed to be the first reported case of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus in the Philippines, Health Secretary Enrique Ona announced Wednesday. The nurse, a friend of the Filipino paramedic who died from MERS last week in the United Arab Emirates, tested positive and has been quarantined along with nine other people who may have been exposed to the virus, Ona said.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

"Don't do that journey, pilgrim" could be the message here.

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Vials of deadly SARS virus 'go missing' in France

Vials of deadly SARS virus 'go missing' in France | Virology News | Scoop.it
Thousand of vials of the contagious respiratory disease SARS go missing from its high-security laboratory in France
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Must be the perfidious Albion...or plain incompetence?

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Are Bats Spreading Ebola Across Sub-Saharan Africa?

Are Bats Spreading Ebola Across Sub-Saharan Africa? | Virology News | Scoop.it

The first cases went unrecognized. Ebola had never been seen in Guinea before, so when people became ill with fever, muscle pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, health workers initially assumed Lassa fever or yellow fever—both endemic in the region—were to blame. No one put the pieces together until late March. By then, the virus had been spreading for months. Now, health workers are struggling to contain the outbreak, which has already killed more than 100 and has affected at least two neighboring countries. At the same time, scientists are combing the forests, and the genome of the virus itself, looking for clues to how this strain—well known in Central Africa—ended up so far west, and whether its spread suggests people in forested areas all across sub-Saharan Africa are at risk.

 

Ebola is not a complete stranger to West Africa. In the mid-1990s, two outbreaks hit chimpanzees in Taï National Park in the Ivory Coast, and one researcher studying the animals was infected. (She survived.) "We expected to find the Taï strain," says Sylvain Baize, a virologist at the Institut Pasteur in Lyon, France, who with his colleagues sequenced some of the first samples of the virus from Guinea. To their surprise, it turned out to be Ebola Zaire, the deadliest of the five known Ebola species.

 

"We have no idea how it's moved from Central Africa to Guinea," says primatologist Christophe Boesch of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. A leading suspect is fruit bats. In Central African rainforests, several species have shown evidence of infection with Ebola without getting sick. And at least one of the species, the little collared fruit bat, Myonycteris torquata, has a range that stretches as far west as Guinea. "We've always been very suspicious of bats," says William Karesh of EcoHealth Alliance in New York City, who studies the interactions among humans, animals, and infectious diseases.

 

Ebola virus graphic by Russell Kightley Media


Via Torben Barsballe
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Thanks Torben Barsballe!

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