Virology News
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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Ebola Doctor Shortage Eases as Volunteers Step Forward

Ebola Doctor Shortage Eases as Volunteers Step Forward | Virology News | Scoop.it
Even with the volunteers, experts say, there will be a long gap before hospitals can be fully staffed to care for the growing numbers of Ebola patients.

Via Paul Kim
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Virus injected into the heart may save thousands

Virus injected into the heart may save thousands | Virology News | Scoop.it
A revolutionary gene therapy treatment for heart failure is about to undergo its first international trial in the UK.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

I love the way they manage to write an entire article without mentioning which virus it is, once...a free norovirus to the first reader who responds with the correct article!

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Mutant strawberry virus threatens $17M N.S. industry - Nova Scotia - CBC News

Mutant strawberry virus threatens $17M N.S. industry - Nova Scotia - CBC News | Virology News | Scoop.it
Nova Scotia's multi-million dollar strawberry industry is under attack from a mutant pest.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

"the result of two known viruses combining into a new, mutated form...": I love it.  Mutated zombie strawberry viruses.  Not many people think of mutant strawberry viruses...B-)

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Hepatitis A virus discovered to cloak itself in membranes hijacked from infected cells

Hepatitis A virus discovered to cloak itself in membranes hijacked from infected cells | Virology News | Scoop.it
Viruses have historically been classified into one of two types – those with an outer lipid-containing envelope and those without an envelope.

Via Kenzibit
Ed Rybicki's insight:

...and hep A steals membranes from liver cells to circulate as an enveloped particle(s) in blood. This is a fascinating find, and doubtless will be followed by similar for other viruses.

 

The commentary has some speculation as to how vaccines work, if antibodies can't see the virus - but they forget the virus has to get INTO the host in the first place, and environmental forms are non-enveloped, AND that the vaccine may well elicit some degree of cell-mediated immunity, which would target infected cells displaying degraded protein on their surfaces via MHC I-type receptors.

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Gaby's curator insight, October 20, 2014 7:20 PM

Una noticia que revolucionará a los virologos!

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Future Virology Introducing yesterday’s phage therapy in today’s medicine

Future Virology Introducing yesterday’s phage therapy in today’s medicine | Virology News | Scoop.it

The worldwide emergence of ‘superbugs’ and a dry antibiotic pipeline threaten modern society with a return to the preantibiotic era. Phages – the viruses of bacteria – could help fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Phage therapy was first attempted in 1919 by Felix d’Herelle and was commercially developed in the 1930s before being replaced by antibiotics in most of the western world.

 

I have long had a fascination for the use of phages to treat disease - and now it looks like it's the new-new wave of the future, as antibiotics begin to fail.

Image courtesy of Russell Kightley Media


Via Chris Upton + helpers
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Virophages, polintons, and transpovirons: a complex evolutionary network of diverse selfish genetic elements with different reproduction strategies

Virophages, polintons, and transpovirons: a complex evolutionary network of diverse selfish genetic elements with different reproduction strategies | Virology News | Scoop.it

The results of the phylogenomic analysis of the virophages and related genetic elements are compatible with the concept of network-like evolution of the virus world and emphasize multiple evolutionary connections between bona fide viruses and other classes of capsid-less mobile elements.

Altogether, virophages, polintons, a distinct Tetrahymena transposable element Tlr1, transpovirons, adenoviruses, and some bacteriophages form a network of evolutionary relationships that is held together by overlapping sets of shared genes and appears to represent a distinct module in the vast total network of viruses and mobile elements.


Via Chad Smithson
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Blow your MINDS, virologists...deep relationships between phages, human viruses, satellite viruses and big DNA viruses - as well as with diverse mobile elements within genomes.

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Ignacio López-Goñi's curator insight, May 25, 2013 3:50 AM

Apasionante: el tema se complica! 

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Multi-virus detector chip created by Singapore team

Multi-virus detector chip created by Singapore team | Virology News | Scoop.it
In a world first, a Singapore scientist and his team have developed a chip which can detect up to 70,000 different viruses and bacteria in one test.
Ed Rybicki's insight:

Virus on a chip: one better than gannet on a stick....

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Negative vaccine sentiments are contagious on Twitter, study says

Negative vaccine sentiments are contagious on Twitter, study says | Virology News | Scoop.it

On  Twitter, anti-vaccination statements appear to be socially contagious while pro-vaccination statements are not, according to a team of researchers 

who tracked 318,379 pro- and anti-vaccine messages on the social networking website.

Starting in 2009, the team from Penn State University tracked the vaccine-related messages that Twitter users were exposed to, and then observed how those users expressed their own opinions about a new H1N1 influenza vaccine. Positive sentiments would be, for example, an expressed desire to get the H1N1 vaccine, while a negative statement would be a belief that the vaccine caused harm.

Ed Rybicki's insight:

Viral sentiments spreading via Twitter...Twiruses??

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Killers on the loose: the deadly viruses that threaten human survival

Killers on the loose: the deadly viruses that threaten human survival | Virology News | Scoop.it
Could the next big animal-human disease wipe us out?

 

I do so love a good scare story.  Especially about viruses.


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